Most Used Features In OpenStack—10 Years of OpenStack

Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you. Powering the world’s infrastructure, now and in the future. Thank you for the 10 incredible years of contribution and support.

There are so many milestones to celebrate in the past 10 years of OpenStack with the community. Here we have gathered the most used features in OpenStack from the community members around the world.

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“Dashboard(Horizon)”

https://docs.openstack.org/horizon/latest/

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“Ceilometer”

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“Horizon”

https://docs.openstack.org/horizon/latest/

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Favorite OpenStack Events—10 Years of OpenStack

Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you. Powering the world’s infrastructure, now and in the future. Thank you for the 10 incredible years of contribution and support.

There are so many milestones to celebrate in the past 10 years of OpenStack with the community. Here we gathered people’s favorite OpenStack events from the community members around the world.

1.

“OpenStack Summit in Vancouver in 2018! Sardina Systems has invited the Information Services Group Manager of the University of Edinburgh to co-speak at the event, and our customer was so thrilled about the summit. Thank you! #10YearsofOpenStack”

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“OpenStack Summit Vancouver 2015″

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“Openstack summit Berlin in October 2019 😉 An awesome city and a lot of wonderful speakers!”

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“OpenStack Summit Shanghai”

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10 Years of OpenStack – Prakash Ramchandran at Dell Technologies

Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful. 

Here, we’re talking to Prakash Ramchandran from Dell Technologies. He tells the community about how he got started with OpenStack and his favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack

How did you get started working with OpenStack and what are you doing now?

I started working with OpenStack from the early Nova, Swift, Quantum to Neutron, early Edge and NFV efforts, use of Heat and Declarative templates, and use in Management and Orchestration (MANO), and now I’m back to OpenStack as Individual Member of the Foundation Board of Directors. I’ve participated in the India OpenInfra community, Airship, RefStack, and InteropWG now, and also container and k8s clusters for Open Infra.

What is your favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack?

My favorite memory of OpenStack is working with the early Neutron, NFV efforts and now Open Infrastructure Projects Airship, Zuul, and working towards Intelligent Platform for the coming decade.

How did you contribute to the OpenStack community?

I contributed to the community as a technical evangelist and Emerging to new Open Platform for 2030s.

What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack?

My advice is that people should follow the 4Cs: Communicate, Collaborate, Contribute, and Commit. You should look for new emerging innovations in open source and specifically in OpenStack and Open Infrastructure.

If I were to ask you in 2030, what do you think the OpenStack update will be?

The OpenStack ride has been phenomenal and has tracked Linux. It’s good that it caught on the Open Infrastructure early and rode on to GPU and CUDA through bare metal and container innovation. The workload for AI and HPC stack has brought us to the new era of Quantum Computing. This will see it through the next decade marking the 30 years of Four Opens.

Get Involved

If you’re interested in being featured to tell your stories about OpenStack, please email [email protected].

Follow the #10YearsofOpenStack hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and share your favorite memories of OpenStack with us!

Follow us on
Twittertwitter.com/OpenStack
Facebookfacebook.com/OpenStack
WeChat ID: OpenStack

10 Years of OpenStack – Yumeng Bao at ZTE Corporation

Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful. 

Here, we’re talking to Yumeng Bao from ZTE Corporation. She tells the community about how she got started with OpenStack and her favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack.

How did you get started working with OpenStack and what are you doing now?

Four years ago,  I was standing at a crossroads in my life. At that time, I was about to graduate from the University of Leeds in the UK with a master’s degree in electronic engineering, thinking whether to pursue a Ph.D. in the academic area or land my job in the industry area as an OpenStack software engineer.

Since I had done my research master’s degree, I was quite familiar with what a Ph.D. would be doing. However, Cloud Computing and OpenStack were totally fresh to me, which therefore sparked my interest in digging more. After searching cloud computing trends, reading blogs, watching many OpenStack Summit videos taken in 2012-2015 including keynotes, panel discussions, case studies shared by notable companies and institutions, what resonated with me the most were the magic strength of open source, the promising future of cloud computing, and the uniqueness of OpenStack. I fell in love with cloud computing and OpenStack. So I took the job as an OpenStack software engineer offered by ZTE and started my contribution to the OpenStack community.

During the past four years, I grew up with OpenStack from a junior engineer to a senior engineer, contributed to OpenStack Watcher and Cyborg projects (accelerator management), and now served as a core reviewer in Cyborg project and ex-core reviewer in Watcher project.

What is your favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack?

What impressed me the most was “open.”   

The community is open to anyone. As a developer, every single line code you contributed can be reviewed by others, that really means a lot to me especially sometimes when my patchsets got reviews from experienced contributors and notable technical core members. Their pertinent comments and suggestions not only guided me on feature implementation, but also helped me deep dive into OpenStack ecosystem technologies, and in building graceful coding habits and systems thinking skills.

Besides that, OpenStack Summit (newly named Open Infrastructure Summit) happens every year since 2012. This provides an open and efficient social channel for companies to get feedback from customers, operators to share their experience, and developers to discuss their plans face-to-face. I met lots of peers there and made quite a few good friends when I was attending the Atlanta, Dublin PTGs,  the Boston, Sydney, Shanghai Summits, and the Wuhan, Beijing Hackathons held in mainland China.

Thirdly, OpenStack is quite open to all kinds of new challenges. Challenges include not only the technical revolutions but also black swan events that happened to some OpenStack membership companies. OpenStack has kept its good sense in seeking possible solutions and led the community in a good direction.

How did you contribute to the OpenStack community?

As an upstream developer, I started contributing to the resource optimization project OpenStack Watcher since the Ocata release in 2016.

At that time, I was participating in solving an energy-saving requirement from CMCC, how to fulfill user network application requirements with minimal energy consumption given the changing network traffic workloads. We finally found a solution with OpenStack Watcher, and it was tested effectively in helping telecom operators save energy and reduce cost of data center. Later, I shared this case in a session at the Boston Summit and contributed the solution to the Watcher project. After one and a half year’s contribution to Watcher, I shifted my research direction to accelerator management service and started contributing to Cyborg from the Rocky release in 2018. Ever since that, I contributed in cyborg-tempest-plugin, cyborg-specs, cyborg APIs, api-ref, GPU driver improvement, as well as tests in real production env which is urgently needed by quality insurance of Cyborg and its integration with Nova.

What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack?

In terms of suggestions for Stackers and other open source communities, I’m not an expert on this. But from a contributor’s perspective, I would strongly recommend “keep open and ensure the quality.” Keep open is for cross-project efforts, as a newly born project, my project encountered a problem when we were trying to push integration with nova (no offense) to implement the feature of creating an instance with accelerators. As the Cyborg project itself is not mature yet, we’ve got doubts and concerns from Nova. And our solution was to find familiar people who work in Nova and help push the progress. This situation is well understood but probably may slow down the thrift of newly born projects like Cyborg. I hope the community can keep open to newly born projects, help them design a good architecture, and speed up their growth. Maybe a Technical Committee (TC) member who can talk to will be helpful in those cross-project efforts? And yes, one more important thing is that any new project itself cannot ensure the quality too much.

If I were to ask you in 2030, what do you think the OpenStack update will be?

Technologies are changing, but a stable release is also important for the industry. 

In China, telecommunications giants adopted OpenStack, and several leading internet companies such as Tencent, Baidu, Bytedance use OpenStack either as their internal infrastructure or develop their private product based on OpenStack. Also, some financial organizations deploy OpenStack. For industries like telecom and financial, stability is more important than technological updating speed.  However, things are different for internet companies, where efficiency is life.

With the growth of the maturity and stability of OpenStack, I think OpenStack is able to go to more industries and help more traditional industries who are seeking a digital transformation.

Even in the areas which OpenStack already in, there will be new opportunities. Take education, for example, many universities in China recently opened the subject cloud computing as a majority for computing science degrees, which may have many training and research projects.

Get Involved

If you’re interested in being featured to tell your stories about OpenStack, please email [email protected].

Follow the #10YearsofOpenStack hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and share your favorite memories of OpenStack with us!

Follow us on
Twittertwitter.com/OpenStack
Facebookfacebook.com/OpenStack
WeChat ID: OpenStack

10 Years of OpenStack – Tim Bell at CERN

Happy 10 years of OpenStack! Millions of cores, 100,000 community members, 10 years of you.

Storytelling is one of the most powerful means to influence, teach, and inspire the people around us. To celebrate OpenStack’s 10th anniversary, we are spotlighting stories from the individuals in various roles from the community who have helped to make OpenStack and the global Open Infrastructure community successful. 

Here, we’re talking to Tim Bell from CERN. He tells the community about how he got started with OpenStack and his favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack.

How did you get started working with OpenStack and what are you doing now?

At the start of the 2010s, CERN was preparing for a significant increase in its computing capacity to meet the needs of the Large Hadron Collider and other experiments. A project was launched to replace our home-written infrastructure tools by community open source solutions, collaborating with other organizations facing similar challenges.

By 2012, we had completed our evaluations and shared the results at the San Diego OpenStack summit and we went into production in July 2013.

In 2020, we’re now running an OpenStack cloud of over 300,000 cores covering more than 90% of the compute resources delivered by the CERN IT department with the CERN storage team providing PBs of ceph block, shares and object space and more than 500 Kubernetes clusters using OpenStack Magnum and 5,000 bare metal servers using OpenStack Ironic.

What is your favorite memory from the last 10 years of OpenStack?

Many OpenStack events and summits have special memories with the close collaboration of the development teams and information exchange with other cloud operators. Among the highlights were the awarding to the CERN team of the first OpenStack superuser award in a unique event in Paris 2014 and the joint CERN and Square Kilometer Array summit presentation in Barcelona 2016.

The OpenStack Scientific Special Interest Group is always a memorable event at each summit with the chance to discuss with other scientific labs around the world on the approaches to using clouds for research.

How did you contribute to the OpenStack community?

One of the principles of the CERN re-engineering of our infrastructure tools was to be able to contribute back changes to the upstream communities. This ensures we can run recent versions of software and also provides a mechanism to share our enhancements with others. The CERN team has made nearly 1000 commits from 34 contributors over the past 8 years. Significant activities have been done in collaboration with industry through the CERN openlab framework such as Keystone Federation (with Rackspace), Magnum containers-as-a-service (Rackspace), Cells v2 (Huawei) and pre-emptible ‘spot’ instances (Huawei).

CERN also contributes to OpenStack governance, where I have been an individually elected member of the OpenStack management board since 2012, was part of the OpenStack user committee for 3 years and other members of the team serve on the user and technical committees along with taking Project Team and Core Lead roles.

We have regularly shared our OpenStack experiences at OpenStack summits and user group events. This includes particularly memorable events where we were able to organize visits to CERN such as the Swiss User Group and the CERN OpenStack day in 2019 which included opportunities for underground visits to the LHC experiments and the anti-matter factory.

What advice do you have for the Stacker community and other growing open source communities based on your experience with OpenStack?

The principle of ‘4 opens’ of the OSF provides the core values of the community. While technologies change frequently and projects must navigate through supporting current users and on-boarding new contributors, OpenStack can evolve within this framework via worldwide collaborations at scale with both the Open Infrastructure project areas and other foundations in the open source world.

If I were to ask you in 2030, what do you think the OpenStack update will be?

By 2030, the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) upgrades would be in place and the computing challenges presented at the CERN OpenStack day will have needed to be addressed such as processing the 1 EB of data expected per year.

Research is already ongoing with accelerators such as GPUs in the CERN cloud but given the initiative that has recently started at CERN on Quantum Computing, maybe 2030 would be an opportunity for the OpenStack community to add Quantum-Computing-as-a-Service to the project list!

Get Involved

If you’re interested in being featured to tell your stories about OpenStack, please email [email protected].

Follow the #10YearsofOpenStack hashtag on Twitter and Facebook and share your favorite memories of OpenStack with us!

Follow us on
Twittertwitter.com/OpenStack
Facebookfacebook.com/OpenStack
WeChat ID: OpenStack

Submit your first OpenStack patch in three steps

If you are new to the OpenStack Community and want to start the contribution, this document can help you in a quick way. OpenStack does not use github pull request instead it uses Gerrit for code collaboration tool. Also, there is some accounts setup required for using the Gerrit system. This guide will quickly help you to set up those accounts and the minimal steps.

Read more »

Victoria vPTG Summaries

The OpenStack community had a great virtual Project Teams Gathering (PTG). The first virtual event hosted 44 projects and spanned all timezones. Since the event concluded, many of those teams have posted summaries of the discussions they have had and the decisions that were made during the PTG.  


As vice chair of the Technical Committee, I wrote up my own summary of TC discussions from our 8 hours of meetings: Victoria vPTG Summary of Conversations and Action Items on the OpenStack blog. If there is a particular action item you are interested in taking, please reply on the mailing list thread where I first posted the summary.

Project Specific PTG Summaries


TripleO, Wesley Hayutin, Project Team Lead (PTL)

Neutron, Nate Johnston (TC)

Neutron from Slawek Kaplonski (PTL) 

OpenStack Technical Committee, yours truly

Cyborg, Meeting 1 Summary, Yumeng Bao (PTL) 

Cyborg, Meeting 2 Summary, Yumeng Bao (PTL) 

Oslo, Ben Nemec (PTL)

Cinder, Brian Rosmaita (PTL) 

Manila, Goutham Pacha Ravi (PTL)

Feedback from the PTG


Instead of a live feedback session, like we have done at in-person events in the past, we provided an etherpad all throughout the event to collect feedback on how things went from registration to the last meeting. It was also shared to the openstack-discuss mailing list after the event concluded to collect final thoughts. 

https://etherpad.opendev.org/p/June2020-PTG-Feedback

OpenStack TC: Victoria vPTG Summary of Conversations and Action Items

I hope you all had a productive and enjoyable PTG! While it’s still reasonably fresh, I wanted to take a moment to summarize discussions and actions that came out of TC discussions. 

If there is a particular action item you are interested in taking, please reply on the mailing list thread.

For the long version, check out the etherpad from the PTG.

The tldr;

Here are the #ACTION items the TC is identifying members to own:

  • Start the User Facing API Pop Up Team
  • Write a resolution about how the deconstructed PTL roles will work
  • Update Goal Selection docs to explain that one or more goals is fine; it doesn’t have to be more than one
  • Two volunteers to start the W goal selection process
  • Assign two TC liaisons per project
  •  Review Tags to make sure they are still good for driving common behavior across all openstack projects

Here are the things all TC members need to do:

  • Review last goal proposal so that we can decide to accept or reject it for the V release[4]
  • Add systems that are barriers to progress in OpenStack to the Reducing Systems and Friction list
  • Continue conversations you find important

There are a lot of ways everyone in the community can get involved! Just come visit us in the #openstack-tc IRC channel, and we can point you in the right direction.

Tuesday

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Ussuri Retrospective

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As usual we accomplished a lot. Some of the things we accomplished were around enumerating operating systems per release (again), removing python2 support, and adding the ideas repository. Towards the end of the release, we had a lot of discussions around what to do with leaderless projects, the role of PTLs, and what to do with projects that were missing PTL candidates for the next release. We discussed office hours, their history and reason for existence, and clarified how we can strengthen communication amongst ourselves, the projects, and the larger community. 

TC Onboarding

——————–

It was brought up that those elected most recently (and even new members the election before) felt like there wasn’t enough onboarding into the TC. Through discussion about what we can do to better support returning members is to better document the daily, weekly and monthly tasks TC members are supposed to be doing. Kendall Nelson proposed a patch to start adding more detail to a guide for TC members already. It was also proposed that we have a sort of mentorship or shadow program for people interested in joining the TC or new TC members by more experienced TC members. The discussion about the shadow/mentorship program is to be continued. 

TC/UC Merge

——————

Thierry gave an update on the merge of the committees. The simplified version is that the current proposal is that UC members are picked from TC members, the UC operates within the TC, and that we are already setup for this given the number of TC members that have AUC status. None of this requires a by-laws change. One next step that has already begun is the merging of the openstack-users ML into openstack-discuss ML. Other next steps are to decide when to do the actual transition (disbanding the separate UC, probably at the next election?) and when to setup AUC’s to be defined as extra-ATC’s to be included in the electorate for elections. For more detail, check out the openstack-discuss ML thread.

Wednesday

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Help Wanted List

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We settled on a format for the job postings and have several on the list. We talked about how often we want to look through, update or add to it. The proposal is to do this yearly. We need to continue pushing on the board to dedicate contributors at their companies to work on these items, and get them to understand that it’s an investment that will take longer than a year in a lot of cases; interns are great, but not enough. 

TC Position on Foundation Member Community Contributions

———————————————————————————-

The discussion started with a state of things today – the expectations of platinum members, the benefits the members get being on the board and why they should donate contributor resources for these benefits, etc. A variety of proposals were made: either enforce or remove the minimum contribution level, give gold members the chance to have increased visibility (perhaps giving them some of the platinum member advantages) if they supplement their monetary contributions with contributor contributions, etc. The #ACTION that was decided was for Mohammed to take these ideas to the board and see what they think. 

OpenStack User-facing APIs

————————————–

Users are confused about the state of the user facing API’s; they’ve been told to use the OpenStackClient(OSC) but upon use, they discover that there are features missing that exist in the python-*clients. Partial implementation in the OSC is worse than if the service only used their specific CLI. Members of the OpenStackSDK joined discussions and explained that many of the barriers that projects used to have behind implementing certain commands have been resolved. The proposal is to create a pop up team and that they start with fully migrating Nova, documenting the process and collecting any other unresolved blocking issues with the hope that one day we can set the migration of the remaining projects as a community goal. Supplementally, a new idea was proposed-  enforcing new functionality to services is only added to the SDK (and optionally the OSC) and not the project’s specific CLI to stop increasing the disparity between the two. The #ACTION here is to start the pop up team, if you are interested, please reply! Additionally, if you disagree with this kind of enforcement, please contact the TC as soon as possible and explain your concerns. 

PTL Role in OpenStack today & Leaderless Projects

———————————————————————

This was a veeeeeeeerrrry long conversation that went in circles a few times. The very short version is that we, the TC, are willing to let project teams decide for themselves if they want to have a more deconstructed kind of PTL role by breaking it into someone responsible for releases and someone responsible for security issues. This new format also comes with setting the expectation that for things like project updates and signing up for PTG time, if someone on the team doesn’t actively take that on, the default assumption is that the project won’t participate. The #ACTION we need someone to take on is to write a resolution about how this will work and how it can be done. Ideally, this would be done before the next technical election, so that teams can choose it at that point. If you are interested in taking on the writing of this resolution, please speak up!

Cross Project Work

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-Pop Up Teams-

The two teams we have right now are Encryption and Secure Consistent Policy Groups. Both are making slow progress and will continue. 

-Reducing Community Goals Per Cycle-

Historically we have had two goals per cycle, but for smaller teams this can be a HUGE lift. The #ACTION is to clearly outline the documentation for the goal proposal and selection process to clarify that selecting only one goal is fine. No one has claimed this action item yet. 

-Victoria Goal Finalization-

Currently, we have three proposals and one accepted goal. If we are going to select a second goal, it needs to be done ASAP as Victoria development has already begun. All TC members should review the last proposal requesting selection.

-Wallaby Cycle Goal Discussion Kick Off-

Firstly, there is a #ACTION that one or two TC members are needed to guide the W goal selection. If you are interested, please reply to this thread! There were a few proposed goals for VIctoria that didn’t make it that could be the starting point for W discussions, in particular, the rootwrap goal which would be good for operators. The OpenStackCLI might be another goal to propose for Wallaby. 

Detecting Unmaintained Projects Early

—————————————————

The TC liaisons program had been created a few releases ago, but the initial load on TC members was large. We discussed bringing this program back and making the project health checks happen twice a release, either the start or end of the release and once in the middle. TC liaisons will look at  previously proposed releases,  release activity of the team, the state of tempest plugins, if regular meetings are happening, if there are patches in progress and how busy the project’s IRC channel is to make a determination. Since more than one liaison will be assigned to each project, those liaisons can divvy up the work how they see fit. The other aspect that still needs to be decided is where the health checks will be recorded- in a wiki? In a meeting and meeting logs? That decision is still to be continued. The current #ACTION currently unassigned is that we need to assign liaisons for the Victoria cycle and decide when to do the first health check. 

Friday

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Reducing Systems and Friction to Drive Change

—————————————————————-

This was another conversation that went in circles a bit before realizing that we should make a list of the more specific problems we want to address and then brainstorm solutions for them. The list we created (including things already being worked) are as follows: 

  • TC separate from UC (solution in progress)
  • Stable releases being approved by a separate team (solution in progress)
  • Making repository creation faster (especially for established project teams)
  • Create a process blueprint for project team mergers
  • Requirements Team being one person
  • Stable Team
  • Consolidate the agent experience
  • Figure out how to improve project <–> openstack client/sdk interaction.

If you feel compelled to pick one of these things up and start proposing solutions or add to the list, please do!

Monitoring in OpenStack (Ceilometer + Telemetry + Gnocchi State)

—————————————————————————————–

This conversation is also ongoing, but essentially we talked about the state of things right now- largely they are not well maintained and there is added complexity with Ceilometers being partially dependent on Gnocchi. There are a couple of ideas to look into like using oslo.metrics for the interface between all the tools or using Ceilometer without Gnocchi if we can clean up those dependencies. No specific action items here, just please share your thoughts if you have them.

Ideas Repo Next Steps

——————————-

Out of the Ussuri retrospective, it was brought up that we probably needed to talk a little more about what we wanted for this repo. Essentially we just want it to be a place to collect ideas into without worrying about the how. It should be a place to document ideas we have had (old and new) and keep all the discussion in one place as opposed to historic email threads, meetings logs, other IRC logs, etc. We decided it would be good to periodically go through this repo, likely as a forum session at a summit to see if there is any updating that could happen or promotion of ideas to community goals, etc. 

‘tc:approved-release’ Tag

———————————

This topic was proposed by the Manila team from a discussion they had earlier in the week. We talked about the history of the tag and how usage of tags has evolved. At this point, the proposal is to remove the tag as anything in the releases repo is essentially tc-approved. Ghanshyam has volunteered to document this and do the removal. The board also needs to be notified of this and to look at projects.yaml in the governance repo as the source of truth for TC approved projects. The unassigned #ACTION item is to review remaining tags and see if there are others that need to be modified/removed/added to  drive common behavior across OpenSack components. 

Board Proposals

———————-

This was a pretty quick summary of all discussions we had that had any impact on the board and largely decided who would mention them.

Session Feedback

————————

This was also a pretty quick topic compared to many of the others, we talked about how things went across all our discussions (largely we called the PTG a success) logistically. We tried to make good use of the raising hands feature which mostly worked, but it lacks context and its possible that the conversation has moved on by the time it’s your turn (if you even remember what you want to say). 

OpenStack 2.0: k8s Native

———————————–

This topic was brought up at the end of our time so we didn’t have time to discuss it really. Basically Mohammed wanted to start the conversation about adding k8s as a base service and what we would do if a project proposed required k8s. Adding services that work with k8s could open a door to new innovation in OpenStack. Obviously this topic will need to be discussed further as we barely got started before we had to wrap things up. 

As a reminder, here are the #ACTION items the TC is identifying members to own::

  • Start the User Facing API Pop Up Team
  • Write a resolution about how the deconstructed PTL roles will work
  • Update Goal Selection docs to explain that one or more goals is fine; it doesn’t have to be more than one
  • Two volunteers to start the W goal selection process
  • Assign two TC liaisons per project
  •  Review Tags to make sure they are still good for driving common behavior across all openstack projects

Here are the things all of the TC members need to do:

  • Review last goal proposal so that we can decide to accept or reject it for the V release[4]
  • Add systems that are barriers to progress in openstack to the Reducing Systems and Friction list
  • Continue conversations you find important

Enjoy the below (photoshopped) team photo!

Virtual TC Meeting screenshot

A Review of the TC’s Findings from the OpenStack 2019 User Survey

The OpenStack Technical Committee (TC) added their own questions to the annual OpenStack User Survey in 2019. The TC’s six questions looked to gain insight that can directly be applied to improving the software and its roadmap. 

Jay Bryant, Technical Committee member, emphasized “It is important that OpenStack Operators participate in the user survey as this is a major source of feedback from users to the developers.  The Technical Committee and OpenStack project teams take time each year to review the feedback and ensure that future development plans align with operator feedback.  Such direct feedback is important for a community driven project like OpenStack.” 

The TC’s main takeaways include: 

  • Insight into why there are still so many users operating on older releases (35% of respondents don’t upgrade). Future questions like “why are you not upgrading?” may be added to shed light on whether the lack of upgrades is due to difficulty or there being no need for an upgrade. 
  • There is an emphasis on the importance of continuing to do stable releases, as the majority of responses revealed that users upgraded “using only official point releases”.
  • When asked which projects organizations contribute maintenance resources such as patches for bugs and reviews on master or stable branches, core projects had the majority of participation. Nova, Neutron, and Cinder projects had the next most participants. 
  • It was found that of users that were actively participating, they participated in multiple-ways. Primarily, users expressed participation by reporting bug fixes, however many of the users are also taking advantage of the Forum Sessions and Ops Meetups. The TC noted that, “This would seem to support one of the things that we highlight as being unique about our community. We are users and developers collaborating together.”
  • A lack or time or human resources held to be the most prevalent reason for an absence of contributing maintenance resources. 
  • When asking for users to indicate what other ways they could participate, the TC realized they may not directly see the ways that people are participating with the community. 

The TC has decided to keep these same questions in the next survey to test for consistency. However, they plan to refine questions and provide follow ups to unanswered questions later. Furthermore, the TC did not find the results to be surprising, but rather to reveal that the collaborative nature of OpenStack Users was very prominent.


The full TC’s review of the results can be found here. Don’t forget to complete the User Survey before August 20!

Welcome new members to the OpenStack Technical Committee

Please join the community in congratulating the five newly elected members of the OpenStack Technical Committee (TC).

  • Graham Hayes (mugsie)
  • Kristi Nikolla (knikolla)
  • Mohammed Naser (mnaser)
  • Belmiro Moreira (belmoreira)
  • Rico Lin (ricolin)

These members join:

  • Kendall Nelson (diablo_rojo)
  • Jay Bryant (jungleboyj)
  • Jean-Phillippe Evrard (evrardjp)
  • Nate Johnston (njohnston)
  • Ghanshyam Mann (gmann)
  • Kevin Carter (cloudnull)

For more information, check out the full results from the election as well as the election process details.

Even if you aren’t a TC member, you can still get involved! Beyond discussing on the mailing-list and participating in ad-hoc IRC meetings, TC members will hold office hours (for one hour) on the #openstack-tc IRC channel at the following times every week:

You can contact TC members at any time, but there will be an effort to be present at those specific hours. So don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any question!

Thank you to all of the candidates! Having a good group of candidates helps engage the community in our democratic process.