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OpenStack 2014 T-Shirt Design Winner

The 2014 T-shirt design contest is a wrap! Thank you to everyone who shared their creativity and original designs with us this year.
We are excited to reveal our winner, Jaewin Ong of Singapore! This colorful design will debut on T-Shirts at PyCon in Montreal this week, and will be distributed at upcoming events worldwide.
OpenStack T-Shirt Design
We wanted to learn more about the creative mind behind the design, so we asked Jaewin a few questions:
What was your inspiration for this design?
  • The inspiration was actually the OpenStack logo! Since the logo is already of significance, I thought it would be cool to manipulate it with bright colors and superimposing the outline with itself.
 How long have you been designing?
  • My first design was for a T-Shirt, incidentally, during my freshman year in university. The T-Shirts were printed and sold to raise funds for a committee I was involved in. And I started out with MS Paint! I’ve come a long way.
 Where are you currently working?
  • I’m currently a junior in university pursuing a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
 In what way are you involved in OpenStack?
  • I’m afraid to say that my involvement with OpenStack is minimal. Although, I had some experience with Python during my internship. Otherwise, I do find cloud computing to be rather complex and I admire people who do it.
 Do you publish any of your other work online?
  • I don’t publish my work because I’m doing this out of interest. I would be grateful when it comes to a point where I’m publishing my work for other purposes besides interest.
 Is there anything else you might like to share about yourself?
  • I constantly look for opportunities like this to improve myself. It might not be a big deal to some, but it’s a big deal to me!
Congratulations, Jaewin!
Want to see your design on a future OpenStack T-Shirt? Stay tuned on our blog as we announce upcoming design contests!

 

OpenStack Day Events April – May – June 2014

Several upcoming OpenStack Day events are taking place around the world. Please join us in spreading the word and register soon. We hope to see you there!
OpenStack Day Mexico in Mexico City – April 29
  • When: Tuesday, April 29, 2014
  • Where: World Trade Center Mexico
  • Tickets: Tickets are MXN $200.00, covering all meals, workshops and conferences. Register quickly! 
OpenStack CEE Day in Budapest – May 26
OpenStack in Action 5! in Paris – May 28
  • Attendees will be provided with the raw materials to engage with the community, become a consumer of the technology and take part in its evolution
  • When: Wednesday, May 28, 2014
  • Where: CAP 15
  • Admission is free, so register to get an overview of the OpenStack technology, projects updates, challenges, best practices and roadmap for all audiences
#1 OpenStack Day in Milan – May 30
  • When: Friday, May 30, 2014
  • Where: Via Privata Stefanardo de Vimercate
OpenStack Israel in Tel Aviv-Yafo - June 2
Hear about OpenStack’s Icehouse Release from industry thought leaders and local OpenStack users. Following the conference, attend a 3-day training course on the current OpenStack Havana Release
  • When: Monday, June 2, 2014
  • Where: Arts Hall HaBama Herzliya
  • Tickets: We’re expecting +300 OpenStack users, prospective users, ecosystem members and developers to attend, so register quickly!
With an anticipated 500+ attendees from all sectors of London’s wide and diverse tech community, an exciting line-up of speakers and exhibitors, this will be the UK’s largest OpenStack related event this year!
  • When: Wednesday, June 4, 2014
  • Where: 155 Bishopsgate
  • Tickets: The early bird rate expires on May 14th, so register quickly before prices increase!
If you are interested in organizing an OpenStack Day event in your area, please contact events@openstack.org.

 

OpenStack Summit – now with more Ops

I’m excited about what the upcoming Atlanta OpenStack Summit is going to bring, especially for those of us running clouds.

Once again, we’ve got an Operations track in the main conference. It’s bigger than ever, running Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday — and, the sessions were selected by individuals with some serious ops credentials (as opposed to say, our vendor friends).  “Training your cluster to take care of itself and let you eat dinner in peace“, “because AD != LDAP“, and “Cinder on Ceph War Stories” are some of the sessions I’m looking forward to.

Throughout the week, there’s also specific presentations on Security, Compute, Networking and Storage, but today we’re excited to highlight a brand new section: the Ops Meetup.

People who run clouds need to have a place to congregate at the Summit and swap best practices, architectures, ideas and give feedback – this is the Ops Meetup. Essentially, all of the sessions are designed to be full-room discussions: there will be no presenters and salient notes will be collaboratively recorded on Etherpads, just like in the Design Summit.

So, if you’re running a cloud and you want to actively engage in serious and not-so-serious discussion with like-minded folks, register for the summit, then turn up Monday and Friday to room B308 in Atlanta! You might even make OpenStack better in the process.

You can find the current schedule below. Further details can be found on the planning etherpad, and you are welcome to participation in the discussion on the openstack-operators mailing list.

Until then, may your MTUs match, expired tokens be few, and your message queues be clean. See you at the Summit!

Monday
1115 – 1155   Ask the devs: Meet the PTLs and TC, How to get the best out of the design summit
1205 – 1245  Reasonable Defaults

1400 – 1440  Upgrades and Deployment Approaches
1450 – 1530  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails
1540 – 1620  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails

1730 – 1810  Security

Friday
9:00 – 9:40   Enterprise Gaps
9:50 – 10:30  Database

10:50 – 11:30 Issues at Scale
11:40 – 12:20 Meta Discussion – ops communication and governance

1:20 – 2:00 Ansible
2:10 – 2:50 Chef
3:00 – 3:40 Puppet

4:00 – 4:40 Networking
4:50 – 5:30 Monitoring and Logging

Participate in the OpenStack User Survey by April 11!

We’re kicking off the third round of the OpenStack User Survey this month! You may remember before last November’s Summit in Hong Kong, we helped the User Committee run a survey to aggregate OpenStack deployments and share the results.

Hong Kong Survey Results

The survey received nearly twice as many answers as the previous round (822 compared to 414) and 387 deployments compared to 187.

The first User Survey in Spring 2013 provided great insight to the types of deployments and technology decisions made by the OpenStack community. We were able to catalogue 230 unique deployments – you can see the results presented by the User Committee at the last Spring Summit. Another huge benefit was the ability to uncover new users willing to talk about their OpenStack deployments, which can be found here: http://www.openstack.org/user-stories.

If you are an OpenStack user or have customers with OpenStack deployments, please take a few minutes to respond to our User Survey and pass it along to your network. The goals of the survey are to better define the OpenStack user community and requirements, facilitate engagement and communication among the user community, and uncover new use cases or OpenStack users who might be willing to tell their stories publicly.

Below you’ll find a link and instructions to complete the User Survey by April 11, 2014 at 23:00 UTC. If you already completed the survey last year, there’s no need to start from scratch. You simply need to log back in to update your Deployment Profile, as well as take the opportunity to provide any additional input.

http://www.openstack.org/user-survey

All the information provided is confidential and will only be presented in aggregate unless the user consents to making it public. Aggregate responses will be shared with the OpenStack Board, Technical Committee and community at large to help shape the roadmap and share useful information regarding operational decisions.

You can also help us by promoting the survey so we can secure as much participation as possible, for example by retweeting the OpenStack handle: @OpenStack

Remember, you can hear directly from users and see the aggregate survey findings by attending the next OpenStack Summit, May 12-16, in Atlanta.

Thank you for your support!

 

OpenStack Summit May 2014 Schedule & Registration Deadlines

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The official Summit agenda is now live: http://openstacksummitmay2014atlanta.sched.org

Adjustments, edits, additions to the schedule may be made between now and the Summit.  Continue to visit the site for updates.

Upcoming deadline reminders:

March 28* is the last day to save 50% off the full price and register for the Summit at the discounted Early Bird rate. Don’t miss out – prices will increase on March 29.

Register here: https://openstacksummitmay2014.eventbrite.co.uk

March 31* is the deadline to sign contracts to sponsor the Summit. We still have a few Event and Startup sponsorship levels available. Contact events@openstack.org if you are interested.

April 14* is the deadline to redeem all sponsor and speaker registration codes. If you are a sponsor or a confirmed speaker – please check your email inbox or junk folder for the code. When registering on Eventbrite you will need to enter your code before you select the ticket.

* The time for each deadline listed above is 11:55pm CST.

Please contact events@openstack.org with any Summit related questions.

OpenStack Atlanta Summit Presentation Voting

Wednesday evening we launched the online tool that allows you to rate the presentation proposals summited for the OpenStack Summit coming up May 12-16 in Atlanta.

This is our second year with online voting for summit presentations, and we wanted to let you know about a bug we’ve just corrected that you might have experienced during the first two days of voting. Alert community members discovered that in some cases, older presentations from our prior summit could be displayed once a vote was cast. (The system randomly selects the next presentation to display, and in this particular case it was not limiting the results to only the upcoming summit.) That’s now been corrected and we apologize for the bug that caused it.

Ultimately, the chairs for each track make the final presentation selections, using the ratings gathered from the community as input. To allow a bit more time for you to cast your votes, we’ve extended the voting deadline until midnight central, March 3rd.

If you are a presenter or voter with any questions or feedback, please let us know: events@openstack.org

New Foundation Gold Members & Sponsors

The OpenStack Foundation is thrilled to have new additions to our ecosystem. Three new Gold Members and 18 Corporate Sponsors have recently joined the incredible list of companies who are supporting the Foundation and driving innovation on the platform.  AptiraHuawei and Hitachi won the OpenStack Board’s approval at the November board meeting and joined the Foundation as Gold members, which requires a strong, strategic commitment to the technology and community.

We’ve also seen amazing support in Corporate Sponsorship and we want to share the impressive list of recent additions.

The diversity in technologies and geographic location of these new additions to the ecosystem reflects the growth of OpenStack and its footprint worldwide.  We are looking forward to enjoying each these companies’ unique contributions going forward!

OpenStack Commitment to Interoperability

OpenStack began with the mission to produce a ubiquitous open source cloud computing platform. A key component of that mission is building not only software, but a large OpenStack ecosystem that would support its growth and add value to the core technology platform. In carrying out that mission, the Foundation has been taking key steps to define the core technology platform and advance OpenStack interoperability.

The TL;DR summary:  Now that we have tons of users, we need to make sure all (downstream) products labeled “OpenStack” have a certain set of core capabilities, and we need to verify those with automated tests just like we do upstream.  End-users should be our focus, and ensuring they get what they want and expect out of the platform once it’s running as a service is paramount.  The goal is to define the first set of tests in time for the May 2014 Summit in Atlanta. If this matters to you, get involved!

Read on to learn more about the rationale, history, future plans, and how you can get involved.

Why does interoperability matter for OpenStack?

We’ve heard from many users and operators that interoperability between OpenStack clouds and hybrid cloud scenarios are an important part of the value they are seeking. OpenStack is most useful when it provides a common platform to consistently deploy workloads between clouds without making resource intensive changes to operations tools and processes. Value is unlocked when development tools and applications have a common target across public and private OpenStack clouds.

The full potential of OpenStack will not be realized if users don’t know what they’re going to get from public cloud services or off-the-shelf distributions and appliances. Ambiguity or mistrust about the capabilities of OpenStack isn’t good for the business ecosystem or end users. It’s important that public clouds and private cloud products branded with OpenStack have a clear meaning in the market.

What is the Foundation doing?

One of the most important responsibilities we have as a Foundation is to ensure the long-term value of the OpenStack brand in the market. This has been an ongoing priority since our founding and has involved the collective effort of a great number of community members.

When we began, we implemented an OpenStack trademark policy, which allows broad use of the OpenStack logo and name for non-commercial community building efforts like user group meetups, while also creating special guidelines, technical requirements, and licenses for use by commercial products. As the community, the software, and the ecosystem have grown, so too has the need to refine these technical requirements for commercial products, by defining a core set of capabilities included in all products and services marketed as “OpenStack.”

It is indeed a large task, one that stems from the diversity of our community, the breadth of our ecosystem, and the broad application of our software. But it is one that will ensure the longevity, vitality and utility of OpenStack far into the future.

Therefore, in order to agree on a set of well-defined criteria for the core we must take special care to have a transparent and objective process. The Board of Directors and the Technical Committee have initiated a number of programs to tackle the issue.

IncUp (Early 2013)

The first step was forming the Incubation/Future of the Core (IncUp) committee, a joint effort between the OpenStack Board of Directors and Technical Committee, aimed at tackling the process for expanding the scope of OpenStack through new project incubation and promotion.

At the April 2013 board meeting, the Board of Directors approved the IncUp committee’s recommendations, including 1) The technical committee continues to manage the incubation process for new projects applying to be part of the coordinated, integrated release 2) Projects that are part of the coordinated release should be referred to as “Integrated” (but not necessarily “Core”), and 3) “Core” is a label the Board can attach to a project that is part of the regular integrated release.

The Technical Committee is following on these efforts by creating a clear set of guidelines for projects that wish to be officially incubated, as well as the attributes an incubated project should have before being approved for graduation to the integrated release. The purpose of the guidelines are to maintain a high standard of quality and cross-project integration for OpenStack.

The important outcome of the IncUp committee places the responsibility to manage the technical scope of the OpenStack project with the Technical Committee, while the Board ultimately sets the criteria for which technical capabilities should be present in (downstream) commercial products or services marketed as OpenStack. This led to the next phase in the process: considering how to define those criteria in a standard and broadly applicable manner.

Enter the “Spider” (2013)

The Board of Directors formed a new work group to tackle the task of determining how to define Core in a consistent manner that would apply to the varied set of use cases OpenStack addresses and the broad set of technology developed within the community. Early in this effort, the team, including Alan Clark and Rob Hirschfeld, drew a map on a whiteboard of dependencies and relationships that came into play when trying to define which projects were “Core OpenStack.” The drawing, which revealed some of the complexities of the task, resembled a spider mind map and inspired the nickname for the group.

Rather than jump straight into choosing specific projects that would qualify for the “Core” label, the committee focused on defining principles that would apply equally to any commonly required and deployed component of OpenStack deployments. These principles were drafted and reviewed through the summer and fall of 2013 at a series of open community meetings held online and in various locations. After several revisions, the Board of Directors approved the final principles at their November 2013 meeting.

DefCore (Ongoing)

After approving the guiding principles at the Hong Kong Summit in November 2013, the OpenStack Board of Directors created the DefCore committee, chaired by Rob Hirschfeld and Josh McKenty, to define a “core” set of capabilities which are expected to be present in all commercial products marketed as “OpenStack”, along with a set of tests to validate those capabilities.

The creation of DefCore marks a new focus on including a test-driven component to the definition of core. This route is more objective, and test-based standards better addresses our commitment to interoperability. The committee is working to determine which capabilities a commercial offering should include to make use of the OpenStack marks and is currently in the process of standardizing the tests that must be passed. The goal is to repurpose the same testing that we’ve been doing on the upstream code to apply to the products and services downstream, ensuring that they retain the fundamental building blocks of Openstack.

One of the realizations coming out of the early work of the committee was that users think in terms of “capabilities” more than “projects.”  Projects are how we organize as a development community, but in the end the capabilities delivered by an openstack-powered cloud are what really matter, and in practice many capabilities rely on multiple underlying “projects”.  This is a subtle but important distinction which is reflected in the way we think about writing tests to validate those capabilities in the downstream products licensing the OpenStack brand.

The DefCore committee is working against an aggressive timeline with a plan to the pilot must-pass tests for Havana before the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta in May. Icehouse will follow shortly thereafter, and Juno’s test will be ready to go by the Paris summit.

Being able to expose OpenStack cloud test results and provide a defined target for end users is an incredibly important effort and high priority for the Foundation this year. It is our hope that by outlining the steps we’re taking, the community will involve themselves in these efforts and track the progress of this vital endeavor. To get involved in the DefCore process, sign up for the mailing list and follow the wiki for updates.

Instant Poll:

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Atlanta Summit – Call for Speakers Open + Sponsor & Registration Info

The OpenStack Summit will be held in Atlanta, Georgia May 12-16, 2014. Continue to check http://openstack.org/summit for the latest announcements. If you have any questions regarding the Summit please contact events@openstack.org.

The Summit is a five-day conference for OpenStack contributors, enterprise users, service providers, application developers and ecosystem members.  Attendees can expect visionary keynote speakers, 200+ breakout sessions, hands-on workshops, collaborative design sessions and lots of networking. Keynote sessions will take place Monday and Tuesday, the main conference will run Monday – Thursday. The Design Summit, a special track for active technical contributors to plan the next software release, will run Tuesday – Friday. See below image for reference.

SPEAKERS
The call for speakers is now openhttp://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/call-for-speakers/

Hurry, the deadline for submissions is February 14!  All speaking proposals will be posted for public vote in late February, and speakers will be notified in March. If your session is selected you will be provided with a free code to register for the Summit.  If you plan to co-present a topic or panel, be sure to input all planned speakers into the system. Proposed speaking tracks: Operations, Getting Started, Hands-On Workshops (90 minutes), Related OSS Projects, Apps on OpenStack, Cloud Strategy & Business Value, Public & Hybrid Clouds, Ecosystem, Products & Services, Compute, Storage, Networking, Security, and Community Building.

SPONSORS
Sponsoring the OpenStack Summit is a great way to gain exposure and support the open source community. If you are interested in supporting the Summit and would like to have a presence in our expo hall – the executable Atlanta Summit sponsorship agreement will become available on January 21 at 17:00 UTC at this link - http://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/become-a-sponsor/.  If your company did not previously sponsor either the Portland or Hong Kong OpenStack Summits then you will first need to sign the Master Event Sponsorship Agreement.  Please fully read the Sponsorship Prospectus and process to become a sponsor before signing the sponsorship agreement. All sponsorship levels are limited and sold on a first-come, first-serve basis determined by the timestamp on your signed Echosign agreement. After signing the agreement please check your email to confirm submission via Echosign – the contract is not complete until you confirm by clicking the link emailed to you via Echosign.

*New* Headline sponsorship process - Headline contracts will be confirmed on a first-come, first-serve basis if there are 4 or less contracts submitted within the first hour of the executable agreement becoming available. In order to create a fair and level playing field, if more than four (4) companies submit signed contracts within the first hour (between 17:00 – 18:00 UTC) for a Headline sponrship level, the Foundation staff will conduct a lottery to draw the four (4) Headline sponsors. A link to watch a livestream of the lottery drawing will be posted on http://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/become-a-sponsor/ at approximately 18:00 UTC.  The remaining companies that do not secure the Headline sponsorship lottery will be given the opportunity to re-sign contracts and obtain Premier level sponsorship slots in the order they submitted Headline agreements. The lottery is only applicable to the Headline sponsorship level.  If you have any questions please contact events@openstack.org.  We appreciate your support!

Note – If your company has any past due balances owed to OpenStack Foundation, these invoices will need to be be paid in full in order to be eligible to sponsor the Summit.

REGISTRATION
Early Bird Registration will open on January 28 and run through March 21. Act quickly to register, as prices will increase starting March 22, 2014. The link to registration will be posted at http://openstack.org/summit.

We will again offer TWO types of passes. In addition to the “Full Access” pass, there will be a “Keynote + Expo” level pass to help introduce even more people to OpenStack. Restrictions apply to the lower priced pass, so please review the details before selecting a ticket.

Screen Shot 2014-01-14 at 10.49.50 AM

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 11.56.34 AM

Atlanta Summit Schedule

 

It’s Summer Internship Time in the Southern Hemisphere!

After a brisk walk in Austin Texas in mid-30 degree Fahrenheit weather, I welcome the idea that it’s summertime somewhere. Since it’s summertime in the southern hemisphere, we can now announce our next round of Outreach Program for Women internships!

I’m excited that we have four interns and four mentors this time around. Many thanks to HP, the OpenStack Foundation, and Rackspace for funding our four. HP also stepped in this round and made it possible for more of the nine participating organizations to select interns, including OpenStack. Plus, RedHat developers are mentoring our interns. I asked each intern, what do you see when you look above your screen?

Annapoornima Koppad is known as akoppad on IRC. She lives in Bangalore, Karnataka, India. She’ll be working on surfacing the instance actions in the OpenStack dashboard through the Horizon project with our second-time mentor, Julie Pichon. Anna says, “It’s a wintry December in Bangalore, India. There is a gloomy, cold, and yet pleasant atmosphere. There is a small window in front of me, and I think it’s most likely to rain after sometime. I see my neighbours are scurrying up to renovate their house. I sip up my warm tea, and I have some books on my right shelf.”

Sayali Lunkad will be working on adding sparklines to the Dashboard, mentored by Ladislav Smola. Sayali goes by sayalilunkad on IRC and is located in Pune, Maharashtra, India. Sayali says, “I read this mail just as I woke up. I am in my room from where I see the sun up in the sky and parrots and crows in my terrace garden which is connected to my room. It is a pleasant morning, hope everyone has a good day!”

In Dallas Texas we find Cindy Pallares-Quezada (cpallares on IRC) She’ll be working on the Queues API Spec for the Marconi project with Flavio Percoco. Cindy says, “As for what’s above my screen, I see my window. Outside my window there’s lots of leafless branches that belong to a big tree (I’m on the second floor of a two story building). The branches are all covered in melting ice. Past the trees there’s a street and a lawn that’s full of lots of fallen trees and is covered in yellow, orange, and green leaves.”

Miranda Zhang (MirandaZhang on IRC) is in Canberra, Australia and will work with Diane Fleming to enhance the API Complete Reference pages and create a comprehensive OpenStack API Guide. She was kind enough to send pictures of her workstation. Miranda says, “Unfortunately, I’m in a room with no window (otherwise I may be able to tell you about the cuddly rabbits running around the campus, it’s hot sunny summer in Australia now), and above the computer screen I’m looking at, there are just walls, so I look around my workstation, they say a picture is worth a thousand words:”
Workstation

While the interns are super important, I have to emphasize how much we should appreciate the mentoring and project identification work that goes into this program. Our mentors are extremely valuable to OpenStack as are the ideas for 3-month projects. Thanks to everyone who worked together to get these ideas ready and thanks in advance to the mentors and interns who make this project so worthwhile.

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