The OpenStack Blog

Category: Development

OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris

We’re doing it again, bigger: the OpenStack Foundation is delivering a training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack developers are successful at integrating their own roadmap into that of the OpenStack project.  If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris, November 1-2. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit. We’re doing it again before the Paris Summit, as we did in Atlanta, only bigger.

With over 2000 developers from 80 different companies worldwide, OpenStack is one of the largest collaborative software-development projects. Because of its size, it is characterized by a huge diversity in social norms and technical conventions. These can significantly slow down the speed at which changes by newcomers are integrated in the OpenStack project.

OpenStack Foundation partnered with Upstream University to train new OpenStack developers and documentation writers to ensure their bug fix or feature is accepted in the OpenStack project in a minimum amount of time. Students are required to work on real-life bug fixes or new features during two days of real-life classes and online mentoring, until the work is accepted by OpenStack. The live two-day class teaches developers to navigate the intricacies of the project’s technical tools and social interactions. In followup sessions, the students benefit from individual online sessions to help them resolve any remaining problems they might have. Get all the details on the wiki.

Enrolment for the training session in Paris is open: register and reserve your seat for OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris, November 1-2.

OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta A Big Success

The first edition of OpenStack Upstream Training completed today in Atlanta: the class made of software developers from around the world, started learning technical and social convention of one of the largest open source collaboration project. During the first day, twenty people picked a real bug or feature to work on, got their development environment setup, signed the CLAs and made the first attempts at committing and reviewing patches. After getting the ‘hard’ technical skills sharpened, the second day of training was all about learning the ‘soft’, social skills necessary to collaborate with a massive amount of people across the continents.

If you saw pictures of legos on twitter tagged #openstack, you have seen images of the OpenStack City role playing game. The students were split in three groups and starts with a city partially built, with a rough master plan for expansion. One group of students acts as the rulers of the city, another group acts as new contributor and the third group acts as the Product Manager of the new contributors. The role game is a nice way to practice the suggestions of the morning. on how to communicate intentions, execute on ideas, interact with other people working on OpenStack components.

With many years of practise contributing to many free software projects, Loic Dachary kindly donated his time to the OpenStack Foundation to lead the training, adapting the content of Upstream University to the specific needs of OpenStack. The class gives strong emphasis on the soft skills necessary to speed up acceptance of contributions. We noticed that over the years, a lot of new contributors, especially occasional ones, don’t have enough exposure to the big picture of OpenStack and these are more likely to be frustrated by the complex set of tools, processes, people between a bug fixed on a local branch and code accepted upstream. Based on the feedback gathered, this first set of graduates from OpenStack Upstream Training will surely get a pleasant experience. Hopefully they’ll keep growing inside OpenStack community and help future first time contributors.

The group is the first set of graduates of OpenStack Upstream Training: David BinghamBob Bennett, Daneyon HansenJacki Bauer, Gangadhar Singh, Om KumarTim FreundRichard ColemanJerry Xinyu Zhao, Sam Su, Shuichiro MakigakiJunichi MatayoshiDerek AndersonDave Fogelson, Ryo KurahashiRajeev GroverSrinivasa AcharyaVishal Thapar, Rashmi, Rohit, Jack Mac. When you meet them this week, please thank them for the time they dedicated to the project and consider them a beautiful present. I, Loic and other mentors will keep meeting online with them in the next weeks, until their chosen contribution will be merged.Thanks to all participants, Loic and Sahid Orentino Ferdjaoui, Édouard Thuleau, Chris Ricker for assisting.

We hope to replicate the training in Paris: stay tuned for the details soon.

Call for Proposals Open Source @ OpenStack Summit

UPDATE: Friday, April 18 is the deadline for submissions. 

At this year’s OpenStack Summit we’re going to be offering space to Open Source projects that are important to the OpenStack community. We’re calling it Open Source @ OpenStack, and it’s an opportunity for these projects to hold small design summits with their community members. We’re impressed by the number of projects that have grown in the OpenStack ecosystem, and want to continue the practice we started with StackForge of fostering these projects.

We have space and time available for half day sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday, both morning and afternoon. The purpose of the space is to get developers in the same room so they can plan their development for the Juno release cycle. Rather than being a time to market a particular company or technology, it should be an opportunity communication and goal setting. To achieve these goals, we would like participating projects to use the following guidelines:

  • The project needs to be directly related to OpenStack in some way.
  • The project must be open source, with source code available and actively developed.
  • The work needs to be non-commercial and vendor neutral, although a vendor that sponsors a project can organize the meeting.
  • Sessions must be open to anyone who wants to attend. This should be not just an opportunity for core developers to meet, but to also give a venue for people interested in your project to get more information.
  • Meeting notes from the design session should be made publicly available.
  • The group organizers and participants must adhere to the OpenStack Summit Code of Conduct.

If you have a project that you think qualifies for this space, we invite you to submit a proposal for Open Source @ OpenStack. Update: Friday, April 18 is the deadline for submissions. 

Please include:

  • The name of your project.
  • A description of the project and how it relates to OpenStack.
  • The names and contact information for the organizers commiting to hosting the session.
  • Relevant links to project sites such as repositories, bug trackers, and documentation.
  • An estimate of the number of developers you expect to attend your design meeting.
  • A plan for how you intend to use the time and space.

We want to thank everyone for the time and effort they put into supporting OpenStack.

OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta

The OpenStack Foundation is delivering a training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack developers are successful at integrating their own roadmap into that of the OpenStack project.  If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta, May 10-11. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit.

With over 1000 developers from 80 different companies worldwide, OpenStack is one of the largest collaborative software-development projects. Because of its size, it is characterized by a huge diversity in social norms and technical conventions. These can significantly slow down the speed at which changes by newcomers are integrated in the OpenStack project.

OpenStack Foundation partnered with Upstream University to train new OpenStack developers and documentation writers to ensure their bug fix or feature is accepted in the OpenStack project in a minimum amount of time. Students are required to work on real-life bug fixes or new features during two days of real-life classes and online mentoring, until the work is accepted by OpenStack. The live two-day class teaches them to navigate the intricacies of the project’s technical tools and social interactions. In followup sessions, the students benefit from individual online sessions to help them resolve any remaining problems they might have. Get all the details on the wiki.

Enrolment for the training session in Atlanta is now open: register and reserve your free seat for OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta, May 10-11.

Eventbrite - OpenStack Upstream Training

OpenStack at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Group: Chicago-land Meetup

The Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Group hosted the Chicagoland OpenStack Meetup last night, February 20, 2014.  The night kicked off with some quick introductions from OpenStack Meetup Organizer Erik Martensen and CME Host and Senior Director Vinod Kutty. Then the crowd settled in to listen to OpenStack Cinder Core Developer Mike Perez discuss what’s new with the block storage project. It was a lively discussion with thirty plus minutes of enthusiastic Q&A. Most of the audience had a general to advanced concept of Cinder and some even gave Mike an idea or two about what users want in future releases. A very special thank you to Mike for coming out from Los Angeles to address the growing OpenStack interest in the Chicago community. And, thank you as well to the CME and Vinod for the wonderful meeting space.

Outside of the CME GroupCrowd ShotMike & Vinod quiz the audienceMike that might be in the next releaseMike Talking - Interesting

OpenStack Project Update Webinars

Each OpenStack Summit we’ve hosted a Project Update track, where the Project Technical Leads (PTLs) share the state of the project and what’s on the roadmap for the next release. Rather than host the Project Update track during the Hong Kong Summit, we are breaking the sessions out into post-Summit webinars, to allow for broader community participation and give the PTLs a chance to regroup from their Design Summit sessions before presenting.

Join us for the remaining OpenStack projects the week of January 6th and maybe a few additional sessions. The current schedule is below along with registration links that will provide meeting instructions. If you are unable to make the scheduled webinars, please note they will be recorded and available to view after the scheduled date below. Thanks.

Completed Sessions

Thursday, January 16, 2013

9 a.m. Pacific/12 Noon Eastern
Project team leads: Sergey Lukjanov, Data Processing (Savanna) and Michael Basnight, Database Service (Trove)
Data Processing Slides: http://slidesha.re/1duJaxP
Database Service Slides:
Recording: http://bit.ly/1g61ulH

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Mark McClain, Networking (Neutron) and Dolph Mathews, Identity (Keystone)
Networking slides: http://bit.ly/JLiu39
Identity slides: http://bit.ly/1bVlcwQ

Thursday, December 19, 2013
7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Russell Bryant, Compute (Nova) and John Dickinson, Object Storage (Swift)
Compute slides: http://bit.ly/JPQ8FE
Object Storage slides: http://bit.ly/1l1CNoP
Recording: http://bit.ly/1c7IOiH

Tuesday, January 7, 2013
7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Mark Washenberger, Image Service (Glance); Julien Danjou, Telemetry (Ceilometer); John Griffith, Block Storage (Cinder)
Image Service slides: http://bit.ly/1enOuG3
Ceilometer slides: http://bit.ly/KQhDzu
Block Storage slides: http://bit.ly/1ewskiN
Recording: http://bit.ly/1iYl8BF

Thursday, January 9, 2013
Noon Pacific/3 p.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Steve Baker, Orchestration (Heat) and David Lyle, Dashboard (Horizon)
Orchestration slides: http://bit.ly/1gYXj9U
Dashboard slides: http://bit.ly/1dkFi6R
Recording: http://bit.ly/1cVbYO2

Reviewing how Blueprints are handled

OpenStack Compute Tech Lead Russell Bryant has triggered an important discussion on the OpenStack Development mailing list about the process to review blueprints. The Blueprints wiki page currently assigns to Project Tech Leads the task of assigning priority to the blueprints and Russell is suggesting that a wider group of people in the community shares such responsibility..

Blueprints are used by project leaders to track development of significant features in all OpenStack programs: a blueprint is made of a title and a brief description, plus a URL to a wider description of architecture and specifications (usually a wiki or etherpad page).  Given the growing size of OpenStack code base, scaling development operations is increasingly hard and one person cannot handle reviewing all the proposed blueprints and set priorities in a way that guarantees finalization.

This brings us to the second issue that needs to be addressed: managing expectations of new contributors. With so many blueprints being proposed it’s hard for a PTL to be accountable for developers to deliver the code based on blueprint’s priorities. Since the PTL used to set the priority for the blueprint, it is hard to held him/her accountable when the code is not delivered accordingly. There is clearly a separation of powers between the person evaluating the blueprints, the developers that will implement them and the reviewers that will review the code submitted.

Russell’s proposal is to assign the responsibility to review the blueprints to the same team of people that will be responsible for reviewing and approving the code during the implementation phase, the core reviewers. The role of the PTL will still be to set the deadlines for the blueprints and to make sure that the roadmap for the program is sound. The core reviewers will then be sharing with the PTL the responsibility and accountability for the deliverables at each release milestone

In the discussion that’s following on the mailing list there are also proposals to include user input while setting the priorities for blueprints. There are risks also associated with this setup. So far, the process has been discussed only taking into account the needs of OpenStack Compute. The project is the largest OpenStack project by number of blueprints, making it the first to need reviewing the existing process. However, the expectation is that several other OpenStack projects may evolve to this point in the future and this is an important test for that time. As such, we welcome holistic feedback: join the discussion on the development mailing list and in Hong Kong.

The Growing Diversity inside OpenStack Object Storage

Of all OpenStack projects, Object Storage (also known as Swift) has always been considered mature or, in other words, a place where new things rarely happen. I’ve always been looking at the Object Storage project closely and I’m happy to report a lot of exciting things are happening in Swift, specifically around the community participation and growing ecosystem.

The total number of contributors to OpenStack Object Storage reached 136 with as many as 16 different people committing code in a single week of July 2013. Of those, 64 have participated in the Havana cycle, 30 of whom are new contributors to Swift. The charts show a very good upward trending curve for the total authors per week, different people filing new bugs (the Closers/Openers chart) and variety of people filing, triaging, setting priority and fixing bugs (the Changers chart). The top contributors (by patch count) are from 6 different companies: SwiftStack, Red Hat, Rackspace, United Stack, IBM, and eNovance.

Features are also growing: in Havana we’ll get global clusters. This allows deployers to build a single Swift storage system that spans a wide geographic area. For example, a deployer can build a Swift storage cluster that keeps different replicas in different regions for either DR or for low-latency regional access. SwiftStack, SoftLayer, and Mirantis all contributed into the global clusters feature. More details on what’s coming are on the CHANGELOG. Get to the Summit in Hong Kong to hear how Concur set up their global Swift cluster.

More new and cool features are also coming: SwiftStack, Box, and Intel are working on an erasure coding storage policy. Rackspace is working on improving replication. Red Hat is working on making Swift’s interface to storage volumes more dynamic. Work has started on this functionality and will be a major topic of discussion in Hong Kong.

Because of this broad base of contributors, the major feature development addressing real-world use cases, and the proven performance at scale, OpenStack Object Storage is being widely deployed and is powering some of the world’s largest storage clouds. I’m tremendously excited about Swift’s progress and its future trajectory.

OpenStack Launches Training Marketplace

Screen Shot 2013-09-16 at 10.37.09 AM

Today the OpenStack Foundation has launched a new Training Marketplace, making it easier to discover and participate in training courses offered by technology providers in the OpenStack ecosystem. Aptira, hastexo, The Linux Foundation, Mirantis, Morphlabs, Piston, Rackspace, Red Hat, SUSE and SwiftStack are the first companies to have courses available in the Marketplace, with the goal of growing the OpenStack talent pool and accelerating the availability of OpenStack training courses worldwide.

To find an OpenStack training course from the ecosystem of providers, visit http://www.openstack.org/marketplace/training.
OpenStack expertise continues to pay off, with OpenStack jobs consistently paying higher wages and employers doubling the number of job postings over the past year.  The ecosystem has quickly responded to help developers and operators gain these valuable skills, with dozens of courses across 10 countries and 25 cities included in the Marketplace at launch. Future demand for OpenStack skills is only expected to grow, with the BSA Global Cloud Scorecard predicting that 14 million cloud jobs will be created by 2015.

OpenStack Jobs Pay

OpenStack Jobs Pay

“The goal of the Foundation is to eliminate barriers to OpenStack adoption, create more OpenStack experts and ensure that OpenStack has a positive impact on the careers of our community members,” said Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation. “We want to grow the community, accelerate the availability of training programs worldwide and help close the OpenStack job gap.”

In order to offer courses in the Training Marketplace, companies must meet requirements set by the Foundation, with the primary purpose of the course being to contribute to, operate or build applications for an OpenStack cloud. The training curriculum should provide a strong understanding of the OpenStack core projects based on a current version of the software, as well as cover community governance and contribution processes.

In addition to paid and free training courses by companies in the OpenStack ecosystem, there are many community efforts to produce helpful documentation, how-to information and new Operations and Security guide books. There are also many educational sessions and hands-on workshops scheduled for the next OpenStack Summit, November 5-8, in Hong Kong. Workshops from previous Summits are available to view online.

Does your company offer training for OpenStack?  Contact us with details: Ecosystem@openstack.org.

Infrastructure Bootcamp

Recently the Project Infrastructure team hosted a two-day “bootcamp”
for people who are interested in contributing to the Project
Infrastructure.  The OpenStack project is so large, and continuing to
grow, that creating and operating the developer infrastructure for the
project itself is a unique challenge.  Because OpenStack receives code
contributions from more than 600 developers in a release cycle, and
merges as many as 200 changes per day, we are at the cutting edge of
distributed development and testing.

The project infrastructure covers a wide range of tools and services
used by the project, including code review, testing, and
collaboration.  The design and operation of these systems is managed
under the Infrastructure Program which is overseen by the TC just like
the rest of the OpenStack project.  And like any other OpenStack
program, our team is open and we welcome contributions from anyone.

Managing the infrastructure for a project of this scale is a lot of
work, but it is uniquely rewarding because it affects every OpenStack
project and affords interactions with all of the developers.  We heard
a lot of interest from persons and companies who wanted to contribute,
so we held the bootcamp to get anyone who was interested in
contributing together in a room with the current core team of
infrastructure developers.

OpenStack Infrastructure Bootcamp kicks off

OpenStack Infrastructure Bootcamp kicks off
Photo: Elizabeth Krumbach, CC-BY 2.0

Day one saw us all together and discussing how contributions are
accepted, how the team operates, and how new members can expect to
become core members in the future.  We discussed each major system at
a high level, and worked out how all of the systems interact with each
other.

In the evening, we all got together for dinner and spent several
enjoyable hours talking about how we could improve the system, and
generally getting to know each other.

On day two, we dove deeper into some topics of particular interest to
attendees, and generally had a less structured approach where people
who shared interest in an area got together and discussed it in depth.

I think everyone who attended got a lot out of the event, and we’re
already seeing significant new contributions as a result.  I hope that
in several months more time we will have new core members on our
team.  I also think this is a good model for other programs in
OpenStack who want to quickly bring new contributors up to speed.

I’d like to thank Monty Taylor for organizing the event, the rest of
the core contributors (or “coremudgeons”) for talking about what we do
for two days straight, and Hewlett-Packard and the OpenStack
Foundation for sponsoring the event.

Some reactions from others who attended:
http://dague.net/2013/06/29/openstack-infrastructure-bootcamp/
http://princessleia.com/journal/?p=8229

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