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Open Mic Spotlight: Steve Martinelli

steve_martinelliThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Steve Martinelli is an OpenStack Active Technical Contributor and a Keystone Core Developer located at the IBM Canada Lab. He primarily focuses on enabling Keystone to better integrate into enterprise environments. Steve was responsible for adding OAuth support to Keystone and is currently adding Federated Identity support to Keystone. In his spare time he also contributes to OpenStackClient as a Core Developer. Though usually swamped with code reviews, his summer Wednesday nights are reserved for playing in the IBM softball league. You can follow him on Twitter @stevebot

1. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku!

Here’s a haiku:

Code, test, submit patch.
Oh no, forgot to rebase.
Jenkins, I failed you.

If we’re talking gifs, I can’t compete with: http://openstackreactions.enovance.com/.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I learned to code at school, but I’ve learned how to support, test, and build projects while working. When learning a new language, I avoid using books. I generally use an online tutorial to get a development environment up and running, then have the API handy while I poke around. When getting ramped up on an existing project, like Keystone, I find that going through the code, documentation, and running the test suite with a debugger enabled is enormously helpful.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

My inner developer wants to say … ‘Free as in Beer, Speech and Love’: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshuamckenty/6747269389/

But, I’ve learned that it’s much more than that. ‘Open source’ software can drive and accelerate an industry. It can ensure many companies agree upon a standard, and move on to the more interesting aspects of what the technology can do.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

It depends on what I’m doing that day. If it’s something that requires a lot of thinking, then I like to work from my desk at home, where it’s relatively free of distractions, and very quiet. If I’m just dabbling in code, or working on something more ‘mechanical’, then I’m good as long as I have a place to sit.

 5What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

I really like what the folks at CERN are doing. They are really pushing for Keystone to have Federated Identity support. Plus, who doesn’t like smashing subatomic particles together at nearly the speed of light?!

Open Mic Spotlight: Sascha Peilicke

Sascha PeilickeThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Sascha Peilicke is a cloud software engineer for SUSE, where he works on the company’s OpenStack, Crowbar and SUSE Cloud business areas. He is also an open SUSE community member, core contributor and package/maintenance update reviewer. He resides in Nuremberg Germany. Follow him on Twitter @saschpe

1. What random or unique items are in your bag or backpack right now?

Headphones, an umbrella and an air pump. Nothing can go wrong with these.

2. Where is your happy place? Favorite place to visit, vacation, decompress?

The hammock on my balcony – I just installed it yesterday again after temperatures in Germany surpassed 19 degrees Celsius.

3. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

A whole lot, I’d say. I am following a range of mailing lists covering OpenStack (of course), openSUSE, Go, Python, Django, and general Linux. On the other hand, I’m a heavy (Tiny Tiny) RSS user and read a long list of IT industry and developer blogs.

4. What do you think OpenStack will be used for in 20 years, 50 years!?

It will provide just about everything as a service by then. It will be feature-complete with VIMaaS (VIM as a Service) and end the long-raging editor wars.

5. If you couldn’t be a developer, what would your dream job be?

Bar owner next to the Mediterranean Sea. Ideally at the Côte d’Azur or Liguria (Italy).

Open Mic Spotlight: Charles Beadnall

charlesbeadnall_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Charles is currently VP of Engineering at GoDaddy. Previously, he was responsible for the ad and personalization platform at Yahoo!, and before that was in charge of infrastructure at Metaweb, and systems architecture at VeriSign. Connect with him on LinkedIn here

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

Neutron, Ironic and Anvil. Neutron improves and standardizes the way we manage and interact with networked devices. Ironic completes the compute platform: not all workloads are optimized for virtualization. Anvil does a good job filling the installation gap for large deployments with packaging and standardization of OpenStack itself.

2. What does “open source” mean to you?

Open source means constant re-evaluation and optimization. Leveraging a community to streamline code and prevent the commercial software bloat: Linux vs. Windows.

3. What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

Yahoo! since I pulled the team together and they continue to push the envelope with scalability and stability.

4. What do you think is the single most important factor for the success of OpenStack users in 2014?

Getting more hosting companies to adopt and provide OpenStack API-compatible services.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

I was initially involved at a previous company in an evaluation of Eucalyptus, CloudStack and OpenStack. At the time, Eucalyptus was endorsed by Amazon and CloudStack had the largest stable production deployments. OpenStack had an active, growing and inclusive community and high levels of testing. We chose OpenStack at that point and subsequently at GoDaddy as well. Hindsight is 20/20 – the OpenStack community and capabilities have definitely grown faster.

Open Mic Spotlight: Ryan Brady

ryanbradyThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Ryan Brady lives near Jacksonville, NC with his wife and 2 children. He enjoys running and woodworking. He’s a Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat where he works primarily on the TripleO project for OpenStack. Follow him on Twitter @rjbrady

1) How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I started out tinkering on my own. I got my first professional programming job while serving on active duty in the U.S. Marine Corps. Through both college courses and writing a lot of code on the job, I learned a lot and continued down the path I’m on now. I’ve been very luck to work with very talented programmers over the years who taught me many things I couldn’t find in a textbook. I’ve also continued tinkering on my own time for fun working on embedded devices and web projects. I feel like I’m still learning something new every week.

2) What does “open source” mean to you?

Freely available to view, modify and distribute. I think it applies to more than source code, but that is debatable.

3) Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I love to work at home. Most of the time it’s in my home office, but during the spring and fall I love to work for short periods of time from my back porch. The lack of a commute allows me a little extra time every day to devote to development and has the obvious economical and environmental benefits.

4) What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!)

I was very impressed by the deployment at CERN to help process data from the LHC.

5) What drew you to OpenStack?

My initial draw to OpenStack was to investigate it for software development and testing. I was impressed by what I saw and when I was offered the chance to work on it full time, I immediately said yes.

Open Mic Spotlight: Ghe Rivero

1gw1qZzThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

After ten years as a system administrator in a university data center, Ghe joined StackOps in early 2012 to work on a solution for managing your own clouds and those of third parties effortlessly with OpenStack. His first contributions to OpenStack can be traced back to 2011 in neutron project (quantum, by then) and working on the OpenStack Debian packaging team. After that, in late 2012, he became part of HP as a cloud automation and distribution engineer mainly focused in TripleO and Ironic projects. He works from home in Salamanca, Spain, and loves outdoor activities like hiking and cycling, photography and traveling. You can get in touch with him on Twitter at @GheRivero.

1) What drew you to OpenStack?

I first met OpenStack during a virtualization project for some web services. Plain virtualization was ok, but didn’t fulfill all of my desires. So while looking for cloud solutions, OpenStack crossed my path and I fell in love with it. It was free, open and having the backup of great companies was a plus. But what really caught my attention was a growing community willing to welcome new developers. The OpenStack community is one the most enthusiastic I’ve ever met, with all of us working for different companies and collaborating.

2) Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

It all depends on the task I’m dealing with. I love coding by night in my standing desk at home, but in office hours, I really like going to an old library. The silence and calm of the place help me to focus and forget about almost everything. I almost get locked in a couple of times because I lost track of time!

3) What does “open source” mean to you?

It’s the best place to start working on a project, be recognized for your efforts, work in community and share your knowledge and ideas. What I really like about is that in spite of it starting as a computer movement, it has spread to many others places. We can start talking about open culture, with the copyleft and creative commons licenses, open data, Wikipedia and all kind of siblings, and even open democracy with the Iceland’s new crowd-sourced constitution. Openness is everywhere, and the right way to do things. I can’t imagine where we’d be by now if someone would have patented the fire and started charging for it when it was discovered.

4) How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I learned some basic coding skills in college, but in my previous job as a sysadmin I was not very fond of that and tried to avoid it, and delegated as much as possible. After some pitfalls, I decided to take matters into my own hands and start working on some free software projects (GNOME desktop and Debian) and start learning not only about coding but also about community.

5) What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

OpenStack is a pretty mature project despite being only three years old, so the core functionality is the keystone for a growing ecosystem around it, but it’s getting more and more complicated to be installed and operated, so projects like TripleO and Ironic will have a great impact during the next year.

Open Mic Spotlight: Derek Higgins

derekh_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Derek works on OpenStack for Red Hat from his home in the west of Ireland. These days, you’ll find him working on TripleO mainly
contributing to the TripleO CI set-up. When he is not busy keeping his 3 year old and 10 month old out of trouble, Derek volunteers for an ambulance service as a qualified EMT.

When approaching a problem Derek usually jumps in feet first with his eyes closed, and when he finds himself tangled up in the weeds he’ll get out and jump in again somewhere else.

You can follow him on Twitter at @bethehokie.

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

The one I’m working on of course, a reference deployment of OpenStack, is something that we’ve been missing in the community up until now. TripleO is putting a lot of effort into getting that right. Up until now, operators have been left to their own devices when it comes to deciding how they will deploy OpenStack, but having the option of picking a solution that is fully integrated with the upstream development process will make their choice a lot easier.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

On my first day in college a lecturer walked in and asked people who knew what a programming language was to put their hands up. I was one of the people with both hands by my side. I quickly learned pascal and x86 assembly, before moving onto C and C++. After college I started coding in python, and besides the occasional adventure into other languages as needed I’ve pretty much stayed in the python world.

3. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I usually work from an office at home but most weeks I travel across the country to Dublin for a day to work with some of the other Irish based Red Hat engineers. I enjoy this time to touch base with colleagues and learn a little about what they’re working on.

4. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

I don’t really follow any specific blogs, instead I rely on the people/feeds I follow on twitter to draw my attention to interesting stuff. I do read lwn.net weekly and find it an excellent source of the current news in the free software world.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

When the opportunity came up to work on OpenStack I jumped at it. Red Hat was only starting to get involved in OpenStack at the time so there was lots of opportunities to explore the areas that I was most interested in. Since then, there has been no end of new problems being tackled by the community providing an endless stream of interesting projects to get involved in.

Open Mic Spotlight: Paul Michali

This post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Paul Michali is a Technical Lead onPaulMichaliHeadshot the OpenStack team at Cisco. Although new to OpenStack (started in 2013), Paul has been a software developer for over 30 years working at various companies and industries. His current focus is on VPNaaS, and he has been trying to drink from the fire hose for all things Neutron. An empty-nester, he lives in New Hampshire, USA, with his wife and pets. Outside of work, Paul enjoys photography, playing soccer and volleyball, watching sci-fi and action movies on his home theater, and playing on the skid pad with his BMW. Follow him on Twitter @pmichali

1. Where is your happy place? Favorite place to visit, vacation, decompress? 

One of the special places I go to (except for in the winter), is a small beach about an hour away from home. I take my dog early in the morning and he runs up and down the beach, retrieves (usually) balls and sticks I throw into the ocean, and gives both of us a good workout. Being a morning person, it’s nice to get out and watch the sunrise in a quiet and scenic place.

2. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc. do you read every day?

Besides reading the OpenStack developer mailing list (well, ok, maybe I just browse it :) ), I like browsing through StackExchange areas StackOverflow, Super User, Ask Ubuntu, Ask Different (Mac), Programmers, Unix & Linux, and Photography on a daily basis. For leisure reading, I try to get some news and info via Twitter feeds, and I visit Lifehacker.com daily.

3. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

Probably the best thing that helps me grow as a developer, is the desire to constantly learn new things. I try to read a technical book every month or two, am constantly seeking new techniques, methods, and processes that I can apply, and help people as much as I can. I’m frequently humbled by how much one can learn by reviewing other peoples’ code, and by explaining things to others. It helps solidify one’s knowledge and tests past assumptions and learning.

4. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

A mixture. Initially, I was self taught. When we got an ASR-33 Teletype connected to a school computer (don’t ask how long ago that was) in high school, I started writing small BASIC programs during free time. The infection took hold, and by the time I was a senior in high school, I had a part time job, at the first personal computer store in my home town, selling computers and writing small custom business apps for small companies in the area.

By then, I clearly knew what I wanted to be when I grew up, and couldn’t wait to get my own pocket protector (yes, I did get one in my first “real” job). I went to college and learned a ton, filling my head with several languages. From there, I started working, and pretty much in each job I’ve had to learn a new language: microcode, Pascal, C, Java, Perl, and for OpenStack, Python.

5. How did you first get involved in OpenStack?

At the very end of 2012, the whole group I was in had completed a major project and had handed off the reins to another development team. As a next assignment, we were offered two different projects, one of them joining the OpenStack team, of which there was a very limited number of openings. It would be a leap of faith for me, to work in a new area (cloud computing), with a new language (Python), using a new process (open source/community based), and as part of another organization in the company.

I had toyed with Python a bit before, writing some tool scripts, and was intrigued by the language. The thought that I could move away from a more traditional development process using C, and into a much more iterative and incremental process with Python, encouraged me to jump at the opportunity and I haven’t looked back since. It’s been the happiest time for me in my career.

Open Mic Spotlight: Chang Bo Guo

IMG_ChangBoGuoThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Chang Bo is an OpenStacker on IBM’s CSTL cloud team. He has been working on the OpenStack project since October of 2012, with the first batch of OpenStackers from the team in BJ. His first OpenStack contribution can be traced back to 2012, when he worked on the PowerVM driver under Nova to support IBM Power Systems. Now, he mainly focuses on OpenStack Oslo and Nova, and his wish is to work worldwide with top engineers to build the most efficient and high quality common library for OpenStack’s success— Kernel of the Cloud! Find his ‘gpthread’ at http://weibo.com/u/3977991006 or find him on LinkedIn here

1. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

The openstack-dev is the mailing list I must read every day. It is like morning coffee to me, with which I can follow community trends. Another important web site that I read every day is http://www.openstack.cn/. It’s OpenStack China’s technical community. They report on the latest news from OpenStack’s China-based companies as well as technical sharings.

2. If you couldn’t be a developer, what would your dream job be?

I planned to be a physicist when I was young. Physics show the rules of nature, and every new discovery will improve our view of the world. I always got the highest physics score in my high school :).

3. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

Always reading code and practicing in a real environment. We learn too much knowledge about how the operating system is running and how to program in different languages. These are just keys to the treasure, and hands on experience makes me feel close to the truth. For instance, I wrote code snippets to verify the wrong usage of sqlalchemy — the code is small but enough to show the truth.

4. What is your favorite project that you’ve contributed code to?

Oslo, the common library for all OpenStack projects. It is very important and useful for each project. We need to guarantee the quality of code to make it work well. I still remember when my first patch for Oslo was merged after a long term review. In this project, we have Python experts and domain experts. New common ideas are raised here, and to review them, I have to dig into Python standard and third party libraries and learn domain knowledge that will help me grow quickly.

5. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

We seem to have finally found a direction that most people believe to build an open cloud ecosystem, and more and more companies and people join the community. I was surprised by this fact, and my friend one day told me that his company had been training them with OpenStack. From my view, his company’s business is far from cloud. The rapid spread of OpenStack makes us more close with the cloud.

Open Mic Spotlight: Tatiana Mazur

tatiana_pictureThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Tatiana Ovchinnikova (nee Mazur) was a mathematician fond of coding. One day she got bored, and turned into a coder fond of maths. She has focused her efforts on Horizon, the OpenStack web dashboard, and now she is a member of the core team. She hopes that she will make Horizon even better than it already is.

1. What do you think OpenStack will be used for in 20 years, 50 years? 

In 20 years OpenStack will be used to power every device, big or small, from cell phones to microwave ovens. Just because it will be so perfect and lightweight that everyone will want to use it. As for 50 years, I believe that at some point before that OpenStack will contact us to discuss our future collaboration.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I’m a proud self-taught. All has begun with programs to help with everyday activity: for counting Star Date, for EEG processing and visualisation and other small and fun projects. Later I realized that there are a lot of complex problems yet to be solved and there is a plenty of room beyond small hobby programs to apply good coding skills.

3. Define what “open source” means to you.

Open source is an endless library of good and bad examples of coding styles, manners of thinking and communicating ideas. It’s up to you only which way and side to choose, when and how to develop your expertise. Also it is a huge collection of extremely useful and easily customizable tools for everyday work.

4. If you couldn’t be a developer, what would your dream job be?

That is a tough question. I can come up with several dream jobs and it is not so easy to pick one. First of all, I could be an interpreter, this time not from human language to code, but for example from French to Klingon or to Toki Pona. Or to depart from interpretation completely and be a monk in Tiger Temple (tigers are awesome).

5. Vulcan or Romulan?

Kling akhlami buhfik.

Open Mic Spotlight: James Slagle

slagleOpenMicThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

James Slagle lives in Boone, NC with his wife and 7 month old son. He enjoys outdoor activities like hiking, trail running, camping, and canoeing. He’s a Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat where he works primarily on the TripleO project for OpenStack. Follow him on twitter @slagle

1. Where is your happy place? Favorite place to visit, vacation, decompress?

The mountains of NC. We were lucky enough to be able to move there a couple years ago. The scenery, outdoor activities, colder climate, and rural area are just a few of the reasons we like it here. Some might say don’t move to where you like to vacation, because then it won’t be special anymore. But, we still feel like we’re on vacation every time we come home. Plus, I’m fortunate enough to be able to work from home. The view out of my office beats a parking lot any day.

2. If you couldn’t be a developer, what would your dream job be?

Can I only pick one dream job? :) I’d like to own my beer brewery someday. I enjoy spending time and working outdoors, so maybe a forest ranger. I like building things with my hands too, so maybe a wood worker. I also wouldn’t mind if my only job was to be a professional runner, so I could train competitively for the marathon or longer trail races. The good news is that, on a smaller scale, all of those jobs are my everyday hobbies. And, I love being a developer too, so in a lot of ways I already have my dream job.

3. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

I think being fairly self-sufficient and not being afraid to dive into the code to figure out how something works or how to fix a bug. That is one of the main reasons that attracted me to open source software to begin with. Going right along with that is having the knowledge to know when the right time is to ask for help, so that you don’t get stuck or in way over your head.

4. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

It’s growth and sustained momentum. As more people and companies contribute and remain participants, they’re learning for themselves what Openstack is and has to offer. That’s helping OpenStack to stand on its own merits since it’s the contributors and users who are helping spread the word. That reputation attracts even more new growth. The ease with which you can have an impact in the community, and learn for yourself what you can do with OpenStack, is much more valuable than simply reading someone else’s opinion on the matter.

5. How did you first get involved in OpenStack? 

I believe it was a patch to Horizon or Keystone, I can’t remember. I found that an easy way to get involved was to set up a development environment and find something you don’t like, a bug, or something you think can be improved. From there, I looked for a few bugs to fix on Launchpad. Once I had dabbled in OpenStack a bit, I knew it was something I wanted to work on full time.

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