Technical Committee Highlights May 29, 2015

Welcome back from the summit. A huge part of OpenStack’s community gathered together in Vancouver for a week full of brainstorms, problem solving and planning for the next 6 months. So did the Technical Committee and here are the highlights of last week and this week’s meeting.

Design Summit

 

Joint Board and TC meeting

We held a joint Board and TC meeting Sunday afternoon. The DefCore definition has been updated and it now includes the Kilo release, YAY! With the changes, interoperability testing includes:

  • Auth operations within the Identity API; however identity management operations will not be considered designated sections because they are controlled by policies.
  • Management operations for floating IPs through the Compute API.

The testing means that we have concrete evidence of interoperability for OpenStack clouds.

As a community, we have to make a decision about nova-network or neutron API calls and compatibility for interop in the coming six months. Lots of great discussion happened at the Summit, and one way forward is through documenting how to keep floating IP call compatibility by showing how to use ports in the Neutron API to be equivalent to elastic floating IP lists. Stay tuned as we write up more details in a doc near you.

Diversity working group approved to go and set up a mission. This is uncharted territory but we want to chart it as other cloud organizations and open source groups look to us to pave the way.

Tags, tagging, tagification

As part of completing the list of base tags for OpenStack, the TC often has to discuss whether some of them make sense or not. The tags currently under discussion are: tc-approved release and kernel:compute.

Tag (rather confusingly) named tc-approved-release
This tag mostly exists to suffice one of the requirements imposed by the Foundation bylaws. It serves to indicate that the Technical Committee has included a project in the “OpenStack TC Approved Release”, which indicates projects that are suitable to be included in the “Trademark Designated OpenStack Software”. Although the name might be confusing and not sexy, it serves the sole purpose of sufficing the bylaws requirements.Check the proposed change for more info.
Tags named kernel:compute (exciting?) or use-case:basic-compute (boring?)
This tag is meant to indicate the set of services that are required to have a minimum compute deployment. We’re having long discussions around this tag with community members and each other on the TC. The discussions go from whether it is useful at all, what the scopes and limits of this tag are and whether it sends the right message or not. You can follow some of these discussions on the review itself.

Cross-project sessions

The Technical Committee whittled down the list of proposed cross-project sessions to 14 sessions, and we want to report back on these sessions.

The single network stack session has a part two as well, where the discussion came up with the priority to test Linux Bridge on DevStack as well as document the port reuse example that gives more compatible floating IP features. Floating IP quotas will not apply to this situation so people will be able to burn as many public IPs as their port quota allows, but it seems like this documentation is sorely missed right now.

Stable releases have been available with a tag, such as 2015.1, since the project’s inception. But at a cross project session we decided that the current tagged releases are not more stable or tested than any other, and the stable branches are actually the ones we would like deployers to use as reference. We are dedicated to stability and trust of those branches. Please read more and reply on http://lists.openstack.org/pipermail/openstack-dev/2015-May/065144.html with any questions.

We had good forward progress on the service catalog and CORS support in OpenStack. The wiki page has all the Etherpads from sessions if you want to deep dive on those sessions.

Latest news from last TC meeting

We voted to give Scott Moser, maintainer of Cirros, Active Technical Contributor (ATC) status for his work on the lightweight image and operating system we use consistently for launching and testing VMs.

The chef project was proposed as an OpenStack project and the TC voted it in. We still want to see evidence of being an OpenStack project, but moving their open design discussions to the OpenStack-dev mailing list is the right step.

We also passed a resolution to use UTC always. Now, some of us felt this was heavy-handed, but once we learned of the risk of having to restart an election (or a candidate missing a deadline due to confusion on the time or date of election deadlines), we agreed to pass it as a resolution.

Also we have a process for gathering potential release names that start with M and are near the summit location. Monty Taylor is the name coordinator, so look for the list of potential names on Monday, June 1. The next release is less than five months away, October 15, 2015.

A subteam from the TC is working on the OpenStack Project Team Guide June 18-19 in a remote work session and all are welcome to help.

The TC is also looking to provide deep-dive into troublesome issues with teams and help with resolutions. We’re also looking into starting a basic design tenants team as well as cross-project team to improve activity around cross-project specs and the cross-project meeting.

Tags:

Deadline For New Cinder Volume Drivers in Liberty

[Guest post from Mike Perez, Cinder Project Team Lead]

The Cinder team has met this week to begin discussions on the deadline for new volume drivers in the Liberty release. The proposed deadline for volume drivers to be merged by is June 19th 2015. However, we will be finalizing the deadline at the Cinder sprints at the summit on Friday May 15th.

Requirements for a volume driver to be merged:

  • Your blueprint for your volume driver is submitted and approved (mark your blueprint as pending approval to get PTL’s attention)
  • Your volume driver code is posted to gerrit and passing gate tests
  • Your volume driver code gerrit review page has results posted from your CI, and is passing. Keep in mind that your CI must continue running in order to stay in the release. This also includes future releases
  • Your volume driver fulfills minimum features
  • You meet all of the above at least by June 12th. This is to discourage late code submissions. Reviews can take time. Merges can also be very difficult late in the milestone due to the OpenStack Gate testing being very full. In the past we have seen gate wait times take a whole day. Do yourself a favor and don’t wait.

To be clear:

  • Your volume driver submission must meet all the items before we review your code. If not, you’ll have to submit your volume driver in the M release
  • If your volume driver is submitted after Liberty-1, expect me to reference this email and we’ll request the volume driver to be submitted in the M release
  • Even if you meet all of the above requirements by June 12th, it is not guanranteed that your volume driver will be merged by June 19th You still need to address all review comments in a timely manner and allow time for gating testing to finish
  • This does not include backup drivers
  • This does not include connector drivers in os-brick. This will be a separate discussion.

To help speed up the review process, please review the How to Contribute a driver to Cinder documentation.

Tags:

Technical Committee Highlights May 13, 2015

Based on multiple inputs from the openstack-dev mailing list, we’ve discovered we, the TC, need to level up our communications. We have identified two TC members to take on the communications plan, Anne Gentle (that’s me!) and Flavio Percoco. See below for details of the plan, and thanks for reading the first post in the revitalized series.

Welcome and thanks

After the TC elections were complete and validated, we said goodbye to Vish Ishaya, Devanandra van der Veen and Michael Still, and we welcomed new TC members Robert Collins, Jay Pipes, Dean Troyer and Flavio Percoco. The TC voted for Theirry Carrez to continue as TC chair for running the meetings and keeping the TC patch backlog reviewed and organized.

Summit preparation and cross-project track

A subteam worked through the 28 proposals for the cross-project track at the summit to fit into 14 available fishbowl rooms. Doug Hellman then presented it to the TC and we approved it for him to then apply his “note-cards-on-the-floor schedule resolution algorithm” to fit them into available time slots. Those have been pushed to sched at libertydesignsummit.sched.org.

Communication plan

Our goals for communicating about TC activity are to inform both the electorate and the wider community about decisions made, directions pointed, or guidance given through the OpenStack Technical Committee. We’ll use regular posts to the OpenStack Blog, pointers to the post in the weekly Community mailing list, and the feed to http://planet.openstack.org to issue regular communications.

We’ll continue to listen on the openstack-dev mailing list for any issues that come up, and use patches to the governance repo to shape the agenda each week. The final decisions are published to http://governance.openstack.org. Let us know if you envision any additional channels posting to the openstack-dev mailing list. While we did also consider a Twitter account for the TC, we won’t use a common account to avoid splitting attention across too many channels.

New project team guide

In the spirit of replacing aging wiki pages and oral tradition, a small team is tackling writing a project team guide. When we say “be an OpenStack team” we need to be specific about the meaning, processes, releases, and be able to point to documentation that defines our culture and expectations. Jim Blair, Flavio Percoco, Doug Hellman, and Thierry Carrez have agreed to start this effort.

Repository patches policy

Recently the TC decided to keep the repo list tidy by allowing the TC chair to push through basic listing changes proposed by a Project Team Lead (PTL) to their own projects. The agreement is to skip discussing repo additions in the Tuesday TC meeting and instead, let the patches be viewed for at least one week. Then, as long as there is no -1 from a TC member that may need discussion, the TC chair can approve them if the changes have PTL +1 and no TC member -1 by then.

Agenda timing

The process for getting an item considered for the TC meeting agenda had been documented as being proposed “at least 4 business days before meeting,” but now that items are proposed to Gerrit, Thierry proposed changing the agenda schedule to better match the way we work now. We all agreed we can consider a change TC meeting material if posted before 0800 UTC Friday.

Tags, tagging, and marking

We managed to time-box large, expansive discussions about reviews for tags to help define a “tc-approved-release” tag as well as a “compute-kernel” tag. We didn’t go into the discussions expecting resolution, and with the Summit coming up next week, we just wanted to hear more from each other on each topic in real-time, outside of the patch review itself. For the “tc-approved-release” tag, it is meant to embody the Technical Committees responsibility under the bylaws of the OpenStack Foundation. The “compute-kernel” tag is intended to indicate which projects are essential to a basic compute use case. In fact, we even discussed changing the tag name to include use-case. At this point, it’s probably best to read the logs from the meeting and follow along the reviews, as we made no conclusions.

We’re all looking forward to a great week in Vancouver. Thanks for the ongoing input, and keep it coming.

Tags:

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 1 – 8)

Snapshot of the OpenStack community behind Kilo

The OpenStack community that helped create the Kilo release has done some seriously heavy lifting. For the 11th release, there were more contributors, more companies involved and more work across time zones than ever before.

Heat SoftwareConfig resources – primer/overview.

Steve Hardy provides an overview of Heat’s Software Configuration resources, as a preface to digging in more detail into the structure of TripleO heat templates, which leverage SoftwareConfig functionality to install and configure the deployed OpenStack cloud.

Ceph vs Swift – An Architect’s Perspective

A description of architectural details and differences between Ceph and Swift by Christian Huebner. A useful preview of his talk on the same topic at the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

New Specs This Week

OpenStack Reactions

Saying hello for the first time at the summit to someone we know on IRC

Saying hello for the first time at the summit to someone we know on IRC

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Trainings and Certifications Available in Vancouver

It’s almost here! The OpenStack Summit in Vancouver is just around the corner, and we wanted to update you on some upcoming OpenStack Training and Certification classes that will take place in Vancouver around the Summit dates (May 18-22). For those of you traveling, you might want to take advantage of these offers and make the most of your visit.
 
Training Offerings:
Mirantis Training for OpenStack Bootcamp I (OS100) 
Ubuntu OpenStack Fundamentals Training
 
Certification Exams:
Free Red Hat OpenStack Exams: Red Hat Certified System Administrator in Red Hat OpenStack exam
  • Date: Sunday, May 17
  • Times: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. PDT or 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. PDT.
  • Location: Suite 1, Pan Pacific Vancouver Hotel, 300-999 Canada Place, Vancouver BC, V6C 3B5 (near the convention center.)
  • Register herehttps://engage.redhat.com/free-exam-seat-e-201505010215
Mirantis Training OpenStack Administrator Certification – Professional Level (MCA200) 
If you have any questions regarding the above Training and Certifications, please contact the member companies directly for more information.
See you in Vancouver!

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 24 – May 1)

Kilo Logo

Superuser Awards final faceoff: your vote counts

Four great finalists, but only one can win: it’s a close call as the voting deadline approaches for this edition of the Superuser Awards.

Snapshot of the OpenStack community behind Kilo

The OpenStack community that helped create the Kilo release has done some seriously heavy lifting. For the 11th release, there were more contributors, more companies involved and more work across time zones than ever before.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

  • Relax for a day :)

Reports from Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

OpenStack Israel CFP Voting is Open

PyCon-AU Openstack miniconf CFP closes May 8th

Other News

OpenStack Reactions

    Kilo released. Going to the next one.

Kilo released. Another smooth ride to the next one.

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

 

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 17 – 24)

Why you should attend an OpenStack Summit

OpenStack Summits don’t miss a beat – with a schedule full of diverse breakout sessions, captivating speakers, off-the-wall evening events and the occasional surprise, it’s the twice-yearly event you simply cannot miss. What would you add to the list of 10 most memorable summit moments to date?

Gnocchi 1.0: storing metrics and resources at scale

Gnocchi provides a scalable way to store and retrieve data and metrics from instances, volumes, networks and all the things that make an OpenStack cloud. Gnocchi also provides a REST API that allows the user to manipulate resources (CRUD) and their attributes, while preserving the history of those resources and their attributes. The Gnocchi team takes great pride in the quality of their documentation too, fully available online.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports from Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

OpenStack Israel CFP Voting is Open

PyCon-AU Openstack miniconf CFP open

Other News

OpenStack Reactions

 

Having to look for an error into a devstack log

Having to look for an error into a devstack log

 

 The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 10 – 17)

OpenStack DefCore Community Review – TWO Sessions April 21 (agenda)

During the DefCore process, we’ve had regular community check points to review and discuss the latest materials from the committee. With the latest work on the official process and flurry of Guidelines, we’ve got a lot of concrete material to show. To accommodate global participants, we’ll have TWO sessions (and record both):

  1. April 21 8 am Central (1 pm UTC) https://join.me/874-029-687

  2. April 21 8 pm Central (9 am Hong Kong) https://join.me/903-179-768

Help pick the new logos for OpenStack User Groups & OpenStack Days

We are introducing a unique logo for OpenStack User Groups, to help recognize official groups and their important role in helping grow the OpenStack Community. The deadline to complete the survey is Wednesday April 22, 2015.

Let your voice be heard: vote for the Superuser Award!

The Superuser Awards, first launched at the Paris Summit, recognize a team that uses OpenStack to meaningfully improve their business and differentiate in a competitive industry, while also contributing back to the community. This time, the OpenStack community votes to select the winner.

OpenStack breaks a new record for active contributors

With 556 active contributors per month, this first quarter of 2015 is the highest in the history of OpenStack. Compared to the previous quarter, core and regular contributors have also increased 10 percent and 20 percent, respectively. You can read the complete report, including details of the methodology, on the Activity Board repository or take deep into the activity of OpenStack individual projects.

PTL Election Conclusion and Results

Congratulations to the newly elected PTL John Garbutt for Nova and thank you Michael Still for the hard work. The other PTLs have not been challenged but there are some changes. The list and full announcement on the mailing list.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

OpenStack Reactions

Seeing another +1 email for a core nomination

Seeing another +1 email for a core nomination

 

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 3 – 10)

Making your list and checking it twice for the OpenStack Vancouver Summit

Emily Hugenbruch shared her pre-summit checklists: great tips there.

OVN and OpenStack Integration Development Update

The Open vSwitch project announced the OVN effort back in January and Russell Bryant started to look into it. He reports about OVN, calling it “a promising open source backend for OpenStack Neutron”.

OpenStack in the classroom

Amrith Kumar announced an effort to work with educational institutions in Massachusetts and near Toronto (where Tesora has offices) to try and make available a course on cloud computing with OpenStack as the exemplar system.

OpenStack In The Enterprise

A new mini-portal on openstack.org website to discover use cases and white papers from the enterprise world.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

  • None

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

OpenStack Reactions

CB_PyoRUEAAKwgg

when the entire gate is borked and you’re trying to figure out why.

 

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.