The OpenStack Blog

Category: Open Mic

Open Mic Spotlight, 4th Birthday Edition: Kashyap Chamarthy

kashyapThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. For the month of July, we’re focusing on Q&A specific to OpenStack’s 4th birthday. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Kashyap currently works for Red Hat on most things related to open source virtualization/cloud related projects (OpenStack). He works remotely, from India. Kashyap enjoys reading, traveling, and learning to be conscious to live minimally and in an ecologically sustainable way.

1. Where were you when you first heard of OpenStack? What were you doing?

It was in 2012 in Brussels, Belgium. I was there to participate in the (no-nonsense) FOSDEM conference. For most of the second (and the last) day of the conference I was hanging out in the “Virtualization Dev” room and attended the final session of the day: an OpenStack community panel discussion moderated by Thierry Carrez (current OpenStack release manager) & co. Most of the debates in that session were around evolving project governance, roles of linux distributions, release process and plenty their related topics. That’s when I learned about OpenStack.

2. What drew you to OpenStack?

I got involved in OpenStack around 2013 through RDO project (a community OpenStack distribution that stays close to upstream trunk, started by Red Hat). I’d say it’s the sheer range of areas one can contribute to in many useful ways. By the time I was starting with OpenStack, it clearly helped to have been closely familiar with some of the under-the-hood open source virtualization technologies (like libvirt, QEMU, KVM and a ton of tooling around it) that OpenStack relies on. I feel it’s a nice progression to work on a higher-level project like OpenStack that already takes advantage of these and connects them all together in a meaningful way (and not some afterthought bolt-on).

Others factors would be OpenStack’s commitment towards technical meritocracy, its fair (walking the walk style) approach in governance and community interactions, and flat out fun in participating in such a large community-based software project.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

To me, it’s the strong belief that it is the most sensible approach to develop software. Secondly, the realization that “hey, I get to benefit immensely from the work of scores of open source communities (at the tap of a keystroke — thanks to innovations like GPL, Creative Commons and the likes), so it’s just fair to contribute back to those communities on whose labour I’m building my existing work.”

4. Which OpenStack debate gets you the most fired up? Why?

Hmm, off the top of my head I can’t single out something. But there are a lot of interesting technical/community related debates on the very high-traffic upstream openstack-dev mailing list. It’s a great experience for a new person to learn the community culture by following discussions (with some good mail filters), getting a sense of tone on the lists, what kind of topics to bring up (and how) and many more things — just by plain old observation.

I don’t mean to imply that everything is rainbows and butterflies. Sure, there are (open/closed) conflicts too – like any massive project with a lot of moving parts, but the civilized manner in which most of them are resolved is heartening to see.

5. What is your favorite memory from am OpenStack summit?

I haven’t been to an OpenStack summit, yet. But I was at an OpenStack meetup (“OpenStack in Action 4″ by eNovance, last November in Paris). In the conference lobby, I noticed Mark McClain (current Neutron project PTL) passed by – I walked up, politely introduced my self and had a brief conversation. Before I left him alone, I asked him to share a piece of wisdom that can help one wrap his/her head around the complexity of Neutron (OpenStack Networking project) and its associated open source plugins. “Read ‘iproute2′ man pages, read carefully and experiment more, it’s full of useful details,” Mark said. And I still haven’t gotten to
it. So, by saying it out loud here, hopefully I’ll get my act together and spend some quality time with it. :-)

Open Mic Spotlight: Claudiu Belu

claudiu_openstackThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Claudiu Belu is 23 years old, and a cloud engineer at Cloudbase Solutions. Currently living in Timișoara, Romania, he’s generally a curious person, trying to expand his knowledge and experience as much as he can making use of them on the job, contests or other personal projects. Looking for something new and challenging, he had his first contact with OpenStack about one year ago. The way the community was working on bringing it to new heights and their dedication got his attention and he wanted to bring his skills to the mix as well. Follow him on Twitter @ClaudiuBelu

1. How would you explain your job to your grandmother?

What am I doing at my job?

Well grandma, basically, I’m helping by expanding this new resource called “The Cloud”, by adding and integrating new parts and features to it, making it bigger, work better and be of more use to people. 

What? No grandma,it’s not going to help your crops by making it rain more often.

Then what does it do?

Well, it can do a lot of things, almost anything anyone can imagine and need, from data processing and/or mining to offering complex services over the internet.

2. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku!

An OpenStack core reviewer’s daughter goes to her father and asks:
Daughter: Dad, could I go out tonight with my friends to a party? Mom told me to ask you.
Core reviewer: Hmmm… +2‏

3. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

Ease of deployment is going to be key for wide adoption in the enterprise world. In this sense, I believe that our work at Cloudbase in integrating our Windows based components with Ubuntu Juju and MaaS will bring a great value to the OpenStack ecosystem.

4. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I first started in highschool with Adobe Flash’s ActionScript, but nothing serious. I only took programming more seriously in college, developing my skills and knowledge at an exponential rate through many ways. Those main ways are: mandatory group projects, IT-related conferences and meetups, internships and trainings, coursera.com and udacity.org courses, coding contests, being a trainer myself and of course, through work experience.

What really captivated me about programming is that you basically have a personal butler doing whatever you want and coding was the way to tell it what to do. :)

5. What does “open source” mean to you?

Open source is a great way to share your ideas and contribute to other great ones. By doing so, you can achieve so much more as a large, open group rather than a small one or even alone.
I think what makes open source so great is that anyone can get involved and also the people that get involved are really interested in the projects and their contribution far outweighs the work done in a normal corporation.

Open Mic Spotlight: Ryan Hsu

RyanHsuThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Ryan is a longtime resident of Orange County who recently moved to Silicon Valley to work on Openstack at VMware. He has been mainly focused on testing and infra in Openstack (such as the VMware Minesweeper) but has squeezed in some small contributions in Nova and Horizon as well. Follow him on Twitter @serveshrimp

1. Finish the sentences. OpenStack is great for _______. OpenStack is bad for ______.

Openstack is great for choice. Openstack is bad for nobody. The great thing about OpenStack is that people have total control in selecting the best of breed components to build their cloud. Nobody ever got a nosebleed for choosing Openstack.

2. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku! 

Submit awesome patch
Instantly get minus one
Shout curse at the screen

3. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

My first bout into coding was in the 6th grade when my friends and I would create horrible websites on Geocities. And when we got bored in math class, we would create tiny games in TI-BASIC on our calculators. It wasn’t until college, though, when I actually started coding useful things.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

Anywhere that has little noise and visual distraction, preferably with a dog nearby. Currently the best place is home.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

OpenStack is extremely dynamic unlike any other projects I’ve worked on in the past. The sheer number of people working on the project, diversity of contributors, and level of enthusiasm never ceases to amaze me. Also, Python!

Open Mic Spotlight: Mark Vanderwiel

This post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Mark Vanderwiel has been with IBM Systems & Technology Group for 27+ years. He has worked on development of many projects, most recently with energy management and OpenStack. Currently he’s working on the OpenStack Chef cookbooks in StackForge as a core contributor.

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

I have been most active in the StackForge OpenStack Chef cookbooks. This set of cookbooks is fairly new and growing at a fast pace.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I started with assembly on the 6502 (that’s old school Apple for you young guys), college with green terminals for nice pascal, then at IBM for 15 other languages. Now I focus on python and ruby for my Chef work.

3. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

In my office, looking out the window at the million dollar backup generator, life is good.

4. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

IRC #openstack-chef, #chef

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

The concept of handling cloud infrastructure with open source at first seemed like a wild idea. But after getting involved, it’s been a very interesting and encouraging experience. There are some great folks working on this.

Open Mic Spotlight: Pavlo Shcelokovskky

pavlov_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Having made science in Europe for 12 years (theoretical solid state physics and experimental biophysics), Pavlo Shcelokovskky returned back home to the Ukraine and switched to full-time programming. Currently, he is a software engineer at Mirantis Inc. and for the last six months he has been mostly involved in the OpenStack Orchestration program. Follow him on Twitter @pshchelo

1. How would you explain your job to your grandmother?

To my parents I say that I do stuff that makes things like Dropbox (that they know and use) possible.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

Self-taught, mostly. There were some programming courses back in school and University (in Pascal), and I backed up my theoretical research during my PhD with some FORTRAN programming. Six years ago I started to learn and use Python in my research, and that is the love story going ever since. :)

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

As I come from science, I have a special attitude for “open source”. Openness is what really enables scientific progress by letting you build upon work of others and “stand on the giants’ shoulders”. Only recently, the scientific community started to understand that the code they use and produce is also science, and that it needs to be public as well as the research itself. I am proud to be part of a world-wide scale open source project now.

4. What do you think is the single most important factor for the success of OpenStack users in 2014?

Sahara. Big Data, for better or worse, is the word of the decade, and providing an integration between big data’s stable horse Hadoop and OpenStack will surely draw in more customers and adopters.

5. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

My home is usually a busy and loud place. :) That’s why I prefer to write code in the office.

Open Mic Spotlight: Masayuki Igawa

MasayukiThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Masayuki Igawa is a software engineer at NEC Solution Innovators, Ltd. He has worked there for 15 years on a wide range of software projects, and developing open source software related to Linux kernel and virtualization. He’s been an active technical contributor to OpenStack since the Grizzly release. He is an OpenStack Tempest core member. You can follow him on Twitter at @masayukig.

1. How would you explain your job to your grandmother?

I’d like to say, “I’m contributing code to OpenStack!”
Because my grandmother really knows computer/internet/cloud/open source!

Sorry, it’s a joke… :-P

2. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku!

OpenStack has unlimited possibilities
Beautiful and elegant UI/UX is
Coming soon

3. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I’m self-taught, but also have on-the-job training about code. I started coding when I was 12 years old. I copied many BASIC codes from magazines by my hands. I studied bio-chemistry at university. So I spent some time cutting and pasting DNA of e.coli, actually. And on-the-job, I learned languages such as assembly, C, Java, Ruby, and Python.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

Starbucks is my favorite place. And, my office is good but there are a lot of harmful noises for coding. So, holidays are good for the office.

5. What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!)

My favorite is ConoHa VPS (https://www.conoha.jp/). This is not “cloud”, though. But this is one interesting OpenStack deployment because it’s very different from Amazon web services.

Open Mic Spotlight: Lucas Gomes

lucasgomes_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Lucas works for Red Hat on the OpenStack Ironic project as a core developer. He was born in Brazil, but currently lives in Dublin, Ireland. When not playing with computers he likes traveling, hiking and reading fantasy books.

1. How would you explain your job to your grandmother?

Well… I can definitely try.

Grandma, let’s think for a moment that you’re a computer, a special type of computer… you’re a computer that make cakes and today you’re going to try a new cake recipe written by me.

My job is to write that cake recipe, and for that I start by listing out all the ingredients that my cake needs. Then, below that, I write a step-by-step guide that tells you what to do with those ingredients: mix, mash, stir, bake, etc…when I’m finished, I’m going to hand my new recipe to you (the computer) and you’re going to follow the instructions to make me a cake.

I think that might work.

2. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

I would say TripleO. In my opinion, one of the biggest hurdles to OpenStack adoption is how difficult it is to install and configure it. TripleO is here to solve that problem, but it goes beyond. It’s also about upgrades, continuous integration, deployment and a reference architecture. I think that having a fully integrated, upstream way to install, upgrade and operate OpenStack will make a big impact.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

For me, open source is the right thing to do. It gives you access to a community that is working towards a common goal and not wasting time reinventing the wheel. So, the open source methodology just works, and works better.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I quite enjoy working from home and I think I’m more productive because of the lack of interruptions. But I also like the fact that once per week I can get to meet with other Red Hat folks in the Dublin office to socialize and to learn a tad more about what everyone is currently working on.

5. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

The openstack-dev mail-list. For the rest I mostly use Google Plus. It’s nicely integrated with my email interface, so I pretty much rely on following the right people that are relevant to the areas I care about.

Open Mic Spotlight: Simon Pasquier

simonpasquier_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Simon has been an OpenStack Active Technical Contributor since early 2013 when I joined the XLcloud project. XLcloud is a collaborative project (funded by the French government) that involves academics and companies. It aims at demonstrating the feasibility of High Performance Cloud Computing platform based on OpenStack. More specifically, we’re looking at remote rendering, autoscaling, capacity planning and plenty of other cool stuff. Prior to this, my background was with Linux systems and networking. It proved to be a perfect fit for OpenStack where, sometimes you have to get your hands dirty to make it work. :-) 

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

For me, Heat is going to get a lot of attention because orchestration is a no-brainer when you deploy complex infrastructures in the cloud (like XLcloud does for virtual clusters). The Heat team is definitely committed to building a great service, and also very careful to integrate with other initiatives such as TOSCA.

Most of all, the guys are very responsive and friendly with newcomers.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I studied mostly C and C++ in college but I’ve learned much more during my professional life. I’ve used different languages before Python (Ruby, Perl, Javascript) and I find it very helpful. To be a good developer, you don’t need to know a language at your fingertips, but rather take out the best of every community.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

For me, it is all about collaboration and not simply sharing the code. What is important is to recognize any contribution: coding (of course) as well as testing, bug reporting and documentation. Making decisions in the open is also a key component.

Even though there’s a lot of space for improvement, OpenStack encompasses this vision and pushed the “open source” paradigm one step further (see how it has inspired other projects such as OpenDaylight). Finally working on open source projects is a great way to improve your technical and human skills.

4. What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

At the first OpenStack Rhone-Alpes meetup, Gavin Brebner from HP Cloud did a great presentation explaining how the Q&A team was testing, qualifying and stressing their infrastructure. The talk was really enlightening as he listed all the challenges you have to tackle for keeping a large cloud up and running.

5. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

Planet OpenStack and the openstack-dev list, of course. :-)

But I’ve got plenty of other blogs in my reader:

Open Mic Spotlight: Joshua Hesketh

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Joshua Hesketh is a software developer for Rackspace Australia working on upstream OpenStack. He works from his home in Hobart, Tasmania. Joshua is currently President of Linux Australia, previously the co-chair for PyCon Australia and a key organizer for linux.conf.au. He has an interest in robotics having recently completed a degree in mechatronic engineering. Check out his blog here

1. Finish the sentences. OpenStack is great for _______. OpenStack is bad for ______.

OpenStack is great for freedom. OpenStack is bad for proprietary competitors.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I’m self-taught – which might explain some of my bad habits! I learned a bit during university while picking up most of my knowledge from being involved in open source projects.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

To me, open source is a superior development model in which everybody wins – from the users, to the developers and businesses involved. Much more value can be gained from using open source where you can build on the shoulders of giants, collaborate on complicated problems and avoid vendor lock-ins. As users you have the flexibility to use a product to its fullest potential whilst, as developers, having the ability to modify and customize it as needed.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I love working from home. I get to wake up to this view every morning. When I’m not at my home office I spend hours at my favourite cafe, Villino, working while enjoying a flat white.

joshview

5What drew you to OpenStack?

One of the big drawcards for me is the community within OpenStack which is really special. It’s such a large and active project, with hundreds of developers all working in unison. The sense of community is reflected in everyone being nice, approachable and willing to go out of their way to help solve your problem. Everybody is working towards the same goal – to better OpenStack.

This is one of the great success stories of the project – being able to scale its developer base so well. Granted, there are still issues in the getting started pipeline as a consequence of size, but overall the project is very well managed. I am a very big fan of the structure and operation of the OpenStack Foundation. The membership models and egalitarianism are very well set out.

Open Mic Spotlight: Steve Martinelli

steve_martinelliThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Steve Martinelli is an OpenStack Active Technical Contributor and a Keystone Core Developer located at the IBM Canada Lab. He primarily focuses on enabling Keystone to better integrate into enterprise environments. Steve was responsible for adding OAuth support to Keystone and is currently adding Federated Identity support to Keystone. In his spare time he also contributes to OpenStackClient as a Core Developer. Though usually swamped with code reviews, his summer Wednesday nights are reserved for playing in the IBM softball league. You can follow him on Twitter @stevebot

1. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku!

Here’s a haiku:

Code, test, submit patch.
Oh no, forgot to rebase.
Jenkins, I failed you.

If we’re talking gifs, I can’t compete with: http://openstackreactions.enovance.com/.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I learned to code at school, but I’ve learned how to support, test, and build projects while working. When learning a new language, I avoid using books. I generally use an online tutorial to get a development environment up and running, then have the API handy while I poke around. When getting ramped up on an existing project, like Keystone, I find that going through the code, documentation, and running the test suite with a debugger enabled is enormously helpful.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

My inner developer wants to say … ‘Free as in Beer, Speech and Love’: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshuamckenty/6747269389/

But, I’ve learned that it’s much more than that. ‘Open source’ software can drive and accelerate an industry. It can ensure many companies agree upon a standard, and move on to the more interesting aspects of what the technology can do.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

It depends on what I’m doing that day. If it’s something that requires a lot of thinking, then I like to work from my desk at home, where it’s relatively free of distractions, and very quiet. If I’m just dabbling in code, or working on something more ‘mechanical’, then I’m good as long as I have a place to sit.

 5What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

I really like what the folks at CERN are doing. They are really pushing for Keystone to have Federated Identity support. Plus, who doesn’t like smashing subatomic particles together at nearly the speed of light?!

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