The OpenStack Blog

Category: community

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Aug 8 – 15)

Patchwork Onion delivers stability & innovation: the graphics that explains how we determine OpenStack Core

The OpenStack board, through the DefCore committee, has been working to define “core” for commercial users using a combination of minimum required capabilities (APIs) and code (Designated Sections).  These minimums are decided on a per project basis so it can be difficult to visualize the impact on the overall effect on the Integrated Release. Rob Hirschfeld and Joshua McKenty have created the patchwork onion graphic to help illustrate how core relates to the integrated release.

OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris

We’re doing it again, bigger: the OpenStack Foundation is delivering a training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack developers are successful at integrating their own roadmap into that of the OpenStack project. If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris, November 1-2. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit. We’re doing it again before the Paris Summit, as we did in Atlanta, only bigger.

Using gerrymander, a client API and command line tool for gerrit

Over the past couple of months Daniel P. Berrange has worked on creating a python library and command line tool for dealing with gerrit. Gerrymander was born out of his frustration with the inefficiency of handling reviews through the gerrit web UI. Reviewers can use gerrymander to query gerrit for reviews and quickly get a list of comments filtering out comments by bots.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

During the Paris Summit there will be a working session for the Women of OpenStack to frame up more defined goals and line out a blueprint for the group moving forward. We encourage all women in the community to complete this very short surveyto provide input for the group.

Reports from Previous Events

Tips ‘n Tricks

Security Advisories and Notices

Upcoming Events

Relevant Conversations

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers and Core Reviewers

Louis Taylor wudx05
Puneet Arora Miguel Grinberg
Sandro Tosi Piet Delaney
Sam Betts Ilia Meerovich
Philippe Jeurissen Chirag Shahani
Amit Gandhi venkata anil
Takashi Sogabe Takashi Sogabe
Veena Saro Chandra Bhooshan
Juergen Brendel selvakumar
Jin Dong sandhya
Qijing Li Tarun Jain
Mathieu Losmede
Lakshminarayanan Krishnan

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

ghana

Found the bad commit that messed up the gate

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris

We’re doing it again, bigger: the OpenStack Foundation is delivering a training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack developers are successful at integrating their own roadmap into that of the OpenStack project.  If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris, November 1-2. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit. We’re doing it again before the Paris Summit, as we did in Atlanta, only bigger.

With over 2000 developers from 80 different companies worldwide, OpenStack is one of the largest collaborative software-development projects. Because of its size, it is characterized by a huge diversity in social norms and technical conventions. These can significantly slow down the speed at which changes by newcomers are integrated in the OpenStack project.

OpenStack Foundation partnered with Upstream University to train new OpenStack developers and documentation writers to ensure their bug fix or feature is accepted in the OpenStack project in a minimum amount of time. Students are required to work on real-life bug fixes or new features during two days of real-life classes and online mentoring, until the work is accepted by OpenStack. The live two-day class teaches developers to navigate the intricacies of the project’s technical tools and social interactions. In followup sessions, the students benefit from individual online sessions to help them resolve any remaining problems they might have. Get all the details on the wiki.

Enrolment for the training session in Paris is open: register and reserve your seat for OpenStack Upstream Training in Paris, November 1-2.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Aug 1 – 8)

OpenStack and NUMA placement

Nonuniform memory access (NUMA) is a memory architecture that provides different access times depending on which processor is being used. This is a useful feature for improving the performance of virtualized guests. Guests can be optimized to use specific NUMA nodes when provisioning resources. On most modern hardware, one can specify which NUMA nodes a guest can use for virtualization. As an example, by improving performance and reducing latency, the network functions virtualization (NFV) use cases can really take advantage of it. Tiago Rodrigues de Mello wrote a report on the current plans to improve use NUMA placement and asked for comments on his blog.

How do companies do OpenStack?

Yours truly is going around these days asking “how does your company do OpenStack?” to collect best practices and notable mistakes from various leaders of OpenStack’s corporate community. I’m hoping to build a ‘how to’ manual to help managers build better dev teams, more effective at collaborating while shipping products to their customers. This is an effort that goes hand-in-hand with training new developers with Upstream Training and other initiatives aimed at sustaining OpenStack growth. Email me, please, I’d love to hear more stories.

Ops Mid-Cycle Meetup – August 25/26

Are you running an OpenStack cloud? Come down to San Antonio on August 25-26th and hang out with others who do as well.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

During the Paris Summit there will be a working session for the Women of OpenStack to frame up more defined goals and line out a blueprint for the group moving forward. We encourage all women in the community to complete this very short surveyto provide input for the group.

Reports from Previous Events

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Relevant Conversations

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers and Core Reviewers

Welcome Victoria Martínez de la Cruz (vkmc) to Zaqar’s core team

Welcome (back) Jay Pipes to nova-core

Claire Delcourt Koichi Yoshigoe
Ravi Sankar Penta HAYASHI Yusuke
Sridhar Ramaswamy Winnie Tsang
Игор Миловановић Wee Loong
Zsolt Dudás Sunu Engineer
Robbie Harwood Sam Betts
Vitaly Gridnev John Davidge
Victor A. Ying Jacek Świderski
Sergey Nuzhdin Aishwarya Thangappa
Sridhar Ramaswamy
Mike Smith
Di Xu
Subrahmanyam Ongole
John Trowbridge
Emily Hugenbruch
Patrizio Tufarolo
Yaling Fan
Robin Wang
Joseph Davis
Ambroise CHRISTEA
Alexey Miroshkin
Pavlov Andrey
Aviram Bar-Haim

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Take over

Taking over a review of someone else by messing with the Change-ID

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (July 25 – Aug 1)

Brace yourself, DevStack Ceph is here!

It’s already a legend: after 7 months and 42(fortytwo) patch sets, Sebastien Han’s patch got merged into DevStack. The patch configures things to bootstrap a Ceph cluster and then configure the OpenStack services Glance, Cinder, Cinder backup and Nova. A toast to Sebastien’s persistence and to all Devstack maintainers who provided help.

Coding all summer long in OpenStack

The end of Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is near, and intern Victoria Martinez de la Cruz shares her experience as an OpenStack intern with OpenStack.

Keystone team looking for feedback

The Keystone team is looking for feedback from the community on what type of Keystone Token is being used in your OpenStack deployments. This is to help us understand the use of the different providers and get information on the reasoning (if possible) that that token provider is being used. Please respond to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NZNDH3M

Third Party CI group meeting summary:

At this week’s meeting the Third-Party group continued to discuss a new testing terminology proposal and and a proposal for recheck syntax. There was also a summary review of the proposed initial draft for a sharing of best practices and a good discussion on using templates for configuration files. Anyone deploying a third-party test system or interested in easing third-party involvement is welcome to attend the meetings. Minutes of ThirdParty meetings are carefully logged.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

During the Paris Summit there will be a working session for the Women of OpenStack to frame up more defined goals and line out a blueprint for the group moving forward. We encourage all women in the community to complete this very short surveyto provide input for the group.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

sanu m Mahalakshmi
Sitaram Dontu Petteri Tammiaho
Renee Oleksii Chuprykov
Marcus V R Nascimento Liyi Meng
Fausto Marzi JC Delay
Jeff Kramer Chelsea Winfree
lisa michele marino Vlad Okhrimenko
Maria Abrahms Vitaly Gridnev
Alexey Miroshkin Vladyslav Drok
Simeon Monov Pramita Gautam
EliQiao Murali Balcha
Andreas Steil Mike Heald
Alin Gabriel Serdean John Schwarz
Lin Yang Gergely Szalay
Geraint North Forest Romain
Georges Dubus Eddie Lin
Stephane Miller Tim Kelsey
Sunil G Sitaram Dontu
Will Foster ryszard chojnacki
Walter Heck Stephane Miller
Mithil Arun PORTE Loïc
Kieran Forde Robbie Harwood
Sanjay Kumar Singh Mingyan Bao
Fausto Marzi
Daniel Shirley
Martin Seidl

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

metrying

Me trying to use devstack

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Upcoming Industry Events & CFP Deadlines!

Fall is quickly approaching and there are some great industry events around the world coming up on the calendar, as well as Call for Proposals deadlines!

The Global Events Calendar is the primary resource to know what events are approaching. It is fully editable, so you can update the following criteria:

  • If your organization is attending, sponsoring or exhibiting (COLUMN G)
  • Provide feedback or ideas on events (COLUMN H)
  • Add vendor-independent industry events to the calendar (complete ALL criteria)

Here are the upcoming industry events planned for the second half of 2014:

PyCon AU: August 1-5, Brisbane, Australia

  • The OpenStack Miniconf will be held on August 1st and features speakers, including Jamie Lennox, Robert Collins, Matthew Treinish, Anita Kuno & more!

CloudOpen NA: August 20 – 22, Chicago

  • If you are knowledgeable in OpenStack and would like to volunteer at the OpenStack booth, please email events@openstack.org

Interop Mumbai: September 4-5, Mumbai, India
Cloud Connect China: September 16-18, China

  • Attend the half-day OpenStack workshop the afternoon of September 16 for hands-on experience with OpenStack.

DEVIEW: September 29-30, Seoul, South Korea
Gartner Symposium/IT Expo North America: October 5-9, Orlando, FL
CloudOpen Europe: October 13-15, Dusseldorf, Germany
FUTURECOM: October 13-16, Sao Paolo, Brazil
Gartner Symposium/IT Expo Japan: October 28-30, Tokyo, Japan
Open World Forum: October 31- November 1, Paris, France
USENIX LISA: November 9-14, Seattle, WA

  • Stay tuned for the date and time of the half-day OpenStack workshop at LISA 2014!

OW2 Annual Conference: November 4-6, Paris, France
Supercomputing: November 16-21, New Orleans, LA
Gartner Data Center Conference: December 2-5, Las Vegas, NV

  • Interested in exhibiting to this Infrastructure and Operations IT management audience?  Join us in the OpenStack Pavilion.  Contact events@openstack.org for more information.

Here are the approaching CFP deadlines:
Ubucon.DE - July 31

If you have any questions, or you would like to plan a regional OpenStack Day, please contact events@openstack.org

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (July 18 – 25)

How to Effectively Contribute to An Open Source Project Such As OpenStack Neutron

As Neutron’s Tech Lead (PTL), Kyle Mestery has been mostly heads down working to ensure the Neutron project has a successful Juno release. Increasingly, and especially near OpenStack Juno milestone deadlines, he’s forced to make hard choices and start turning new features down in order to focus on shipping good quality code for Juno. He sent an email to the openstack-dev mailing list this morning addressing the pressure his team is under. He also wrote a longer blog post to expand upon that email.

OpenStack Failures

Last week the bulk of the brain power of the OpenStack QA and Infra teams were all in one room, in real life. This was a great opportunity to spend a bunch of time diving deep into the current state of the Gate, figure out what’s going on, and how we might make things better. Sean Dague, Jim Blair, wElizabeth K. Joseph and bmwiedemann wrote a summary of the week.

OpenStack plays Tetris : Stacking and Spreading a full private cloud

CERN is running a large scale private cloud which is providing compute resources for physicists analysing the data from the Large Hadron Collider. With 100s of VMs created per day, the OpenStack scheduler has to perform a Tetris like job to assign the different flavors of VMs falling to the specific hypervisors.

Juno Updates – Security, Authentication and other neat things

There is a lot of development work going on in Juno in security related areas. Nathan Kinder wrote up some of the more notable efforts that are under way in Keystone, Barbican, Kite and other projects.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

During the Paris Summit there will be a working session for the Women of OpenStack to frame up more defined goals and line out a blueprint for the group moving forward. We encourage all women in the community to complete this very short surveyto provide input for the group.

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Mike Smith Roman Vasilets
Mika Ayenson Motohiro Otsuka
Claudiu Nesa David Yuan
Scott Reeve Amey Ghadigaonkar
Pawel Palucki Alexandr Naumchev
Travis McPeak Michele Paolino
Livnat Peer Marcus V R Nascimento
zhangtralon daya kamath
Ryan Brown arkady kanevsky
David Caudill Travis McPeak
FeihuJiang ChingWei Chang
Anusha JJ Asghar
Lee Yarwood Neetu Jain
François Magimel
Ashraf Vazeer

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

wnnng

My reaction when for the first time I had a contribution merged in OpenStack

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (July 11 – 18)

DefCore Update: Input Request for Havana Capabilities

As part of our community’s commitment to interoperability, the OpenStack Board of Directors has been working to make sure that “downstream” OpenStack-branded commercial products offer the same baseline functionality and include the same upstream, community-developed code. The work to define these required core capabilities and code has been led by the DefCore Committee co-chaired by Rob Hirschfeld (his DefCore blog) and Joshua McKenty (his post). You can read more about the committee history and rationale in Mark Collier’s blog post. The next deadlines are: OSCON on July 21, 11:30 am PDT and the Board Meeting on July 22nd.

And the K cycle will be named… Kilo !

The results of the poll are just in, and the winner proposal is “Kilo”. “k” is the unit symbol for “kilo”, a SI unit prefix (derived from the Greek word χίλιοι which means “thousand”). “Kilo” is often used as a shorthand for “kilogram”, and the kilogram is the last SI base unit to be tied to a reference artifact (stored near Paris in the Pavillon de Breteuil in Sèvres).

Five Days + Twelve Writers + One Book Sprint = One Excellent Book on OpenStack Architecture

A dozen OpenStack experts and writers from companies across the OpenStack ecosystem gathered at VMware’s Palo Alto campus for the OpenStack Architecture Design Guide book sprint. The intent was to deliver a completed book aimed architects and evaluators, on designing OpenStack clouds — in just five days.

Only developers should file specifications and blueprints

If you try to solve a problem with the wrong tool you’re likely going to have a frustrating experience. OpenStack developers use blueprints define the roadmap for the various projects, the specifications attached to a blueprint are used to discuss the implementation details before code is submitted for review. Operators and users in general don’t need to dive in the details of how OpenStack developers organize their work and definitely should never be asked to use tools designed for and by developers.

Third Party CI group formation and minutes

At this week’s meeting the Third-Party group continues to discuss documentation patches, including a new terminology proposal, as well as CI system naming, logging and test timing. There was also a summary review of the current state of Neutron driver CI rollout. Anyone deploying a third-party test system or interested in easing third-party involvement is welcome to attend the meetings. Minutes of ThirdParty meetings are carefully logged.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Will Foster zhangtralon
Walter Heck Gael Chamoulaud
Mithil Arun Fabrizio Fresco
Kieran Forde badveli_vishnuus
JJ Asghar Ryan Lucio
Gilles Dubreuil Martin Falatic
Emily Hugenbruch Bryan Jones
Christian Hofstädtler Tri Hoang Vo
Steven Hillman Ryan Rossiter
Rajesh Tailor Mohit
akash Tushar Katarki
Rajini Ram Pawel Skowron
Pawel Skowron Karthik Natarajan
Abhishek L Ryan Brown
takehirokaneko Keith Basil
Kate Coyne
Ju Lim

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

youwelcome

Trivial fix on a review of someone else while he’s asleep so jenkins can pass

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment

Five Days + Twelve Writers + One Book Sprint = One Excellent Book on OpenStack Architecture

Update: You can now download the OpenStack Architecture Design Guide here.

One thing about OpenStack is that you can find lots of information on how to do specific things, such as start an instance or install a test cloud on VirtualBox, but there isn’t much out there to give you the Big Picture, such as how to design a massively-scalable OpenStack cloud, or a cloud that’s optimized for delivering streaming content. That’s why this past week a dozen OpenStack experts and writers from companies across the OpenStack ecosystem gathered at VMware’s Palo Alto campus for the OpenStack Architecture Design Guide book sprint. The intent was to  deliver a completed book on designing OpenStack clouds — in just five days.

Now, I wrote my first book — a pretty straightforward introduction to Active Server Pages 3.0 — in seven weeks, and then it went through months of editing before arriving at the printer. I never wrote a more significant book that took less than six months.  So when I volunteered for the sprint, I confess that I didn’t expect much.  Oh, I knew that at the end of the week we’d have a book.  I just didn’t expect it to be the really great book that actually emerged.

How a book sprint works

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 4.45.58 PM

The process of actually writing the book was pretty regimented, but because we felt like we had control over the direction, we didn’t feel stifled by it.  We started by discussing the audience — architects designing OpenStack systems or evaluating it for use — and brainstorming a likely structure.

After deciding that we’d basically cover groupings of use cases for OpenStack clouds, we brainstormed all the different types we might cover, putting them on Post-its and grouping them on the whiteboard. (Let’s just say that “CI/CD” and “dev/test” were on a lot of our minds.)  Before long it was clear that we had seven major categories, such as “compute focused” or “massively scalable”.

We then broke into two groups, each of which was to take half an hour and brainstorm a structure for these categories.  Interestingly, although we used different terms, the structures the two groups emerged with were virtually identical.  (Which meant there was no fight to the death, which is always nice.)

From there our group of 12 broke into 3 groups of 4, each diving into a section.  At the end of Monday, we had 15,000 words already written (of which we’re still sure 10,000 came from Beth Cohen).

I was stunned.

I wasn’t stunned because we had so much content; I was stunned because it was, well, actually pretty good content.

By Wednesday morning, the book was pretty much written, and it was on to editing.  Groups read through sections written by others to try and fill in any holes, and Beth and I began editing, to try and even out the tone.  After that came two more passes: copyediting (by Alexandra Settle, Scott Lowe, and Sean Winn) and fact checking.

Long before Friday, we had a book that we could be proud of.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 4.47.14 PM

What the OpenStack Architecture Design Guide covers

The OpenStack Architecture Design Guide is for architects and evaluators; deployment is covered in the OpenStack Operations Guide, so we didn’t cover that. The Design Guide covers the following types of OpenStack clouds:

  • General Purpose
  • Compute Focused
  • Storage Focused
  • Network Focused
  • Multi-site
  • Hybrid Cloud
  • Massively Scalable
  • Special cases (clouds that don’t fit into those categories, such as multi-hypervisor)

We talked about the different issues, such as user requirements, technical considerations, and operational considerations for each type of cloud, then talked about the actual architecture and provided some prescriptive examples to make things more concrete and easier to understand.

What community really means

Perhaps the most interesting thing about the book sprint is that it was, in many ways, a microcosm of OpenStack itself.  We all work for different companies, some of which don’t particularly get along, but in that room, it didn’t matter. We were just people getting a job done, and doing it in the best way we knew how, working long hours and joking about our evil overlords (sprint facilitators Adam Hyde and Faith Bosworth) and laughing about anything and everything to keep from going stir crazy.

We watched Alex learn that American Mountain Dew is very different from the stuff they have in Australia, and we saw her transform from a nervous newcomer to a confident writer and editor (though I’m still going to use two spaces after a period, sorry).  Anthony Veiga and Sean Collins consistently impressed us with their knowledge of networking.  Sebastian Gutierrez showed how passionate he is about storage, and especially the wonders of Ceph. Vinny Valedez produced more great diagrams in two days than I did all of last year. Maish Saidel-Keesing and Kevin Jackson continuously inspired us to be better with their hard work and good humor. I’m still laughing at Steve Gordon’s deadpan humor.  (And I apologize to anyone who still has the music from Doctor Who stuck in their head.)

Our goal was to provide a resource for the OpenStack community, to help adoption of a tool we’re all passionate about. Did we joke about it?  Of course we did.  But at the end of the day, we wouldn’t have been there if we didn’t believe in the future of OpenStack, and what it can do, when it’s done right.

The OpenStack Architecture Design Guide will be available electronically free of charge as part of the OpenStack documentation, and like the Operations Guide and the Security Guide before it, it will be available for anyone to submit patches to, a living document that will only get better.  It will also be available for purchase in hard copy through Lulu.  Watch this space for a link!

DefCore Update: Input Request for Havana Capabilities

As part of our community’s commitment to interoperability, the OpenStack Board of Directors has been working to make sure that “downstream” OpenStack-branded commercial products offer the same baseline functionality and include the same upstream, community-developed code. The work to define these required core capabilities and code has been led by the DefCore Committee co-chaired by Rob Hirschfeld (his DefCore blog) and Joshua McKenty (his post).  You can read more about the committee history and rationale in Mark Collier’s blog post.

The DefCore Committee has introduced two key concepts that will be used to define the standard requirements across commercial products: Capabilities and Designated Sections. Capabilities represent the functionality that is exposed by an OpenStack-based cloud through APIs, which can be tested and reported on—for instance starting or stopping a virtual server. Designated sections are portions of upstream code from various OpenStack projects that are required in addition to the API-based capabilities. These requirements can change with each OpenStack release, and the DefCore committee has started with the Havana release to create an “advisory” set of requirements.  After community review on Havana, the Board will repeat the process for Icehouse requirements and then enforce those for the commercial trademark license programs.

Get Involved: Next week, the DefCore Committee will host two meetings for community input on the Capabilities they’ve scoped for the Havana release. The meetings will take place Wednesday, July 16, at 8 am PDT (1500 UTC) and 6 pm PDT (0100 UTC on July 17) to accommodate as many time zones as possible. You can reference the DefCore Committee’s current proposal, and join the meetings using the links on the following page:

After getting community input, the DefCore Committee plans to bring the proposed Havana Capabilities to the Board for approval at the next face-to-face meeting, taking place July 22nd in Portland, OR.  If approved, focus will then shift to the Designated Sections for Havana.

If you’d like to catch up on the work the Committee has been doing since the OpenStack Summit Atlanta, the following links contain the notes from their recent meetings:

https://etherpad.openstack.org/p/DefCoreLighthouse.1
https://etherpad.openstack.org/p/DefCoreLighthouse.2
https://etherpad.openstack.org/p/DefCoreLighthouse.F2F
https://etherpad.openstack.org/p/DefCoreLighthouse.3

 

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (July 4 – 11)

OpenStack Swift 2.0 Released and Storage Policies Have Arrived

OpenStack Swift 2.0.0. This release includes storage policies – the culmination of a year of work from many members of the Swift contributor community. Storage policies are the biggest thing to happen in Swift since it was open-sourced four years ago. Storage policies allow you to tailor your storage infrastructure to exactly match your use case. This release marks a significant milestone in the life of the project that will lead to further adoption and community growth. You can get Swift 2.0 from http://tarballs.openstack.org/swift/swift-2.0.0.tar.gz. As always, you can upgrade to this version without any client downtime.

Wrapping up the Travel Support Program – Juno

The OpenStack Foundation brought 21 people to Atlanta for the Summit in May, thanks to the grants offered by the Travel Support Program, sponsored by VMware. The Travel Support Program is based on the promise of Open Design and its aim is to facilitate participation of key contributors to the OpenStack Design Summit. The Travel Support Application for the November Summit in Paris is NOW OPEN! You can apply for the Travel Support Program, including costs for travel and accommodation.

Missing Building Blocks for Enterprise OpenStack: Part 1 – High Availability

In the long term debate of pets vs cattle OpenStack has always been on the side of cattles. Dmitriy Novakovskiy shared his thoughts on why pets are good and how far away OpenStack is from supporting the more ‘legacy’ applications (TL;DR: not too far away).

Third Party CI group formation and minutes

At Juno Summit in Atlanta, Kurt Taylor, Anita Kuno, and Jay Pipes agreed to form a group focused on the Third Party experience, including but not limited to continuous integration. Part of the mission of the group is to focus on the quality of Third Party testing for OpenStack through improving documentation, gathering requirements, and easing the deployment of third party testing systems. The group has been working to improve the consumability of the components and documentation. They’re inviting all people involved in CI testing to join and help make the Third Party experience easier for developers and administrators to understand and deploy. The group holds regular weekly meetings. This week they discussed timelines for Cinder and Neutron testing, requirements for documentation patches, a proposal for system terminology and helped openATTIC solve its issues starting up the CI system.

Kudos Corner

It’s a great pleasure to highlight good examples of first time contributors to OpenStack getting through their first changeset proposal. Jeegn Chen‘s first changeset is one of such cases. Kudos to him and the community helping him fixing bug #1327497.

The Road To Paris 2014 – Deadlines and Resources

Reports from Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Matthew Printz Slawomir Gonet
Fabio Massimo Di Nitto Prashanth Prahalad
azher ullah khan takehirokaneko
João Cravo azher ullah khan
Romain Soufflet Wayne
deven Vasiliy Artemev
Julia Kreger Dave Neary
Fabrizio Fresco Arnaldo Hernandez
Anant Patil Amit Kumar Das
Liyi Meng Shivakumar M
Richard Jones Richard Hagarty
Maurice Leeflang Michael Chase-Salerno
sh.huang
jizhilong
Rajesh Tailor
Chris Crownhart
Aleksandr Shaposhnikov
Matjaz Pancur
Alok Kumar Maurya
Jyoti
Andrey Epifanov
Abhishek L
Łukasz Oleś
Victor Chima
FeihuJiang
Mike King

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

wyfail

Elastic-recheck bot pointing us to which bug we need to recheck to

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

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