The OpenStack Blog

Open Mic Spotlight: Jay Lau

JayThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Jay Lau (Guang Ya Liu) is an Advisory Software Engineer at IBM CSTL. He is the Technical Leader of the IBM Platform Resource Scheduler project. He has 5+ years of experience in large scale distributed system, SOA and Cloud Computing. He joined the OpenStack community in 2013. Now, he mainly focus on OpenStack compute, storage and application management. You can follow him on Twitter at @jaylau513.

 

1. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

I want to say it is interest and passion. OpenStack is really an amazing project and it makes me want to work for it anywhere, at any time, with any device that can access Gerrit ;-)

2. What is your favorite project that you’ve contributed code to?

Hmm, may I say I love all projects? ;-) To be honest, my current focus is nova, but also extending to cinder and heat.

3. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

If I want to lean code for a product, I will first get familiar with the key features of the product, and then think how the code will be written and then start to read and debug code. For OpenStack, you also need strong system technologies if you want to understand the code.

4. How did you first get involved in OpenStack?

When I first get involved in OpenStack for some research work in 2011, I set up a demo environment with StackOps and found that scheduler is very simple and weak in OpenStack. My company has a very good product named PRS (Platform Resource Scheduler) which is very good at resource scheduling. Hmm, you know how I start my journey on OpenStack then.

5. Define what “open source” means to you.

IMHO, “open source” means contribution and collaboration. Worldwide engineers from different companies collaborate together to contribute to create the best software. As a software engineer, “open source” can make us grow quickly in community.

Category: Open Mic

Atlanta Summit – Call for Speakers Open + Sponsor & Registration Info

The OpenStack Summit will be held in Atlanta, Georgia May 12-16, 2014. Continue to check http://openstack.org/summit for the latest announcements. If you have any questions regarding the Summit please contact events@openstack.org.

The Summit is a five-day conference for OpenStack contributors, enterprise users, service providers, application developers and ecosystem members.  Attendees can expect visionary keynote speakers, 200+ breakout sessions, hands-on workshops, collaborative design sessions and lots of networking. Keynote sessions will take place Monday and Tuesday, the main conference will run Monday – Thursday. The Design Summit, a special track for active technical contributors to plan the next software release, will run Tuesday – Friday. See below image for reference.

SPEAKERS
The call for speakers is now openhttp://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/call-for-speakers/

Hurry, the deadline for submissions is February 14!  All speaking proposals will be posted for public vote in late February, and speakers will be notified in March. If your session is selected you will be provided with a free code to register for the Summit.  If you plan to co-present a topic or panel, be sure to input all planned speakers into the system. Proposed speaking tracks: Operations, Getting Started, Hands-On Workshops (90 minutes), Related OSS Projects, Apps on OpenStack, Cloud Strategy & Business Value, Public & Hybrid Clouds, Ecosystem, Products & Services, Compute, Storage, Networking, Security, and Community Building.

SPONSORS
Sponsoring the OpenStack Summit is a great way to gain exposure and support the open source community. If you are interested in supporting the Summit and would like to have a presence in our expo hall – the executable Atlanta Summit sponsorship agreement will become available on January 21 at 17:00 UTC at this link - http://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/become-a-sponsor/.  If your company did not previously sponsor either the Portland or Hong Kong OpenStack Summits then you will first need to sign the Master Event Sponsorship Agreement.  Please fully read the Sponsorship Prospectus and process to become a sponsor before signing the sponsorship agreement. All sponsorship levels are limited and sold on a first-come, first-serve basis determined by the timestamp on your signed Echosign agreement. After signing the agreement please check your email to confirm submission via Echosign – the contract is not complete until you confirm by clicking the link emailed to you via Echosign.

*New* Headline sponsorship process - Headline contracts will be confirmed on a first-come, first-serve basis if there are 4 or less contracts submitted within the first hour of the executable agreement becoming available. In order to create a fair and level playing field, if more than four (4) companies submit signed contracts within the first hour (between 17:00 – 18:00 UTC) for a Headline sponrship level, the Foundation staff will conduct a lottery to draw the four (4) Headline sponsors. A link to watch a livestream of the lottery drawing will be posted on http://www.openstack.org/summit/openstack-summit-atlanta-2014/become-a-sponsor/ at approximately 18:00 UTC.  The remaining companies that do not secure the Headline sponsorship lottery will be given the opportunity to re-sign contracts and obtain Premier level sponsorship slots in the order they submitted Headline agreements. The lottery is only applicable to the Headline sponsorship level.  If you have any questions please contact events@openstack.org.  We appreciate your support!

Note – If your company has any past due balances owed to OpenStack Foundation, these invoices will need to be be paid in full in order to be eligible to sponsor the Summit.

REGISTRATION
Early Bird Registration will open on January 28 and run through March 21. Act quickly to register, as prices will increase starting March 22, 2014. The link to registration will be posted at http://openstack.org/summit.

We will again offer TWO types of passes. In addition to the “Full Access” pass, there will be a “Keynote + Expo” level pass to help introduce even more people to OpenStack. Restrictions apply to the lower priced pass, so please review the details before selecting a ticket.

Screen Shot 2014-01-14 at 10.49.50 AM

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 11.56.34 AM

Atlanta Summit Schedule

 

Category: Event, Summit, Uncategorized

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 3 – 10)

How are we picking the OpenStack DefCore “must pass” tests?

WARNING LABEL: THE FOLLOWING SELECTION CRITERIA ARE PRELIMINARY TO GET FEEDBACK AND HELP VALIDATE THE PROCESS.
As part of the DefCore work, we have the challenge of taking all the Tempest tests and figuring out which ones are the “must-pass” tests that will define core (our note pages).  We want to have a very transparent and objective process for picking the tests so we need to have well defined criteria and a selection process.

OpenStack @ FOSDEM ’14

Every year, free and open source developers from all over Europe and beyond converge in cold Brussels for a week-end of talks, hacking and beer. OpenStack will be present ! We have a number of devroom and lightning talks already scheduled.

Becoming a Core Contributor: the fast track

Anyone willing to become a better Free Software contributor is invited to attend the next session of Upstream University in advance of FOSDEM. The training starts January 30th, 2014 in the morning, at a walking distance from Grand Place in Brussels.

Organizing a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day – Mon Jan 27th

Developers may have noticed issues with our gate and in order to improve the situation Sean Dague proposed a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day on Jan 27th. All developers are encouraged to focus on fixing bugs on the OpenStack CI infrastructure.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Reports from previous events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Nassim Babaci Julien Leloup
Eugeniya Kudryashova Murali Allada
Daniel Kuffner Georgy Okrokvertskhov
Le Tian Ren David Pippenger
Ildiko Vancsa Pradeep Kilambi
Bo Tang Jon Snitow
Lee Li Viswa Vutharkar
Jia Dong Vahid Hashemian
Rafael Folco
Peter Balland
reachlin
Toshiyuki Hayashi
Le Tian Ren
Jerry Cai
Ihar Hrachyshka
Christoph Kassen
Maxim Kulkin
Simon Luo
lizheming
Tim Bell
Sebastien Badia
Nithya Ganesan

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Morning reviews for an OpenStack core

Morning reviews for an OpenStack core

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Morgan Fainberg

UnknownThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Morgan Fainberg is a Principal Software Engineer at Metacloud.  He has worked on a number of high-profile and large-scale properties across a number of industries (everything from Social Media, to Web Hosting, to Video Games).  He currently spends most of his time working on Keystone and is a member of the Keystone Core team. You can follow him on Twitter at @mdrnstm or read his blog here

1. What is your go-to beverage or snack while coding? 

Do you mean I must make a definitive choice between coffee, espresso, and tea (there is a big difference between espresso and coffee!)?  I guess it all depends on the type of code I’m writing.  If I happen to find myself writing new features, I think a pour-over of a dark, heavy, oily coffee (even better a French press) is the drink of the day.  When it comes to refactoring code (especially those refactors that seem to be made of edge cases upon edge cases and rabbit holes), a perfectly pulled shot of espresso followed by an Italian-style cappuccino.  For anything that is more research oriented, tea is the drink of choice.  Sometimes I can’t believe how much time I spend thinking about the consumption of caffeine.

2. Where’s your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop? In bed?

Based upon my “go-to” beverage answer, I am sure you can guess my favorite place to write code is the local coffee shop.  I definitely prefer the shops that roast their own beans, have specialty pastry items, and are generally more of the “local” scene than the big corporate shops.  A close second would be sitting in front of 12,556,800 pixels at my desk.

3. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

The coolest happening in OpenStack is the interest and adoption that has occurred.  There are few pieces of software (or any form engineering) that really meet the needs of such a varied audience.  It’s very cool to see the big players, the small players, the independents, the public cloud providers, the private cloud deployers, and everyone else involved come together in a friendly a professional way to develop something amazing.

4. Define what “open source” means to you.

Open Source is more than just a licensing view (like some people or companies would like to think).  It’s a philosophy of sharing and community.  The idea is to not only develop something fun and awesome, but to collaborate (especially in the case of OpenStack) across company lines and create a network of like-minded individuals.  It fascinates me to see what the Open Source communities (software developers, artists, even musicians) can accomplish together.  If the Open Source community members did not come from many different backgrounds much of the “ground breaking” work may not have surfaced as quickly (or at all).  Perhaps it is best to equate Open Source as a lifestyle above and beyond anything else.

5. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

I like to jump into projects at the deep-end.  I have, historically, stuck my nose into projects that no one else wanted to look at due to difficulty or complexity (especially in corporate environments).  This behavior has made it easier to dig into the core of any challenge and come up with solutions to interesting issues and problems.  At the very least I have been exposed to a wide variety of technologies and development philosophies.  It all boils down to wanting learn something new each time I sit down to write code.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 3 2014)

OpenStack Documentation Wrap Up for 2013

It’s that time of the new year to reflect and look for ways to keep improving the OpenStack docs. Here’s a list of major events from 2013 in OpenStack doc-land. Anne Gentle looks at the past year in review.

OpenStack strong at LinuxConfAustralia (LCA)

A full-day miniconf on Tuesday and a bunch of talks in the main conference track:

And there’s at least one talk on third-party testing in the CI miniconf on Monday (schedule still TBD), and maybe more surprises.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Reports from previous events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Gustavo Franklin Nobrega Gustavo Franklin Nobrega
shihanzhang shihanzhang
Igor A. Lukyanenkov Igor A. Lukyanenkov
Caleb Tennis Caleb Tennis
wanghong wanghong
Babitha Babitha
Yuanchao Sun

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

unflappable

Getting asked to fix a minor spelling mistake in my comment

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

OpenStack Documentation Wrap Up for 2013

It’s that time of the new year to reflect and look for ways to keep improving the OpenStack docs. Here’s a list of major events from 2013 in OpenStack doc-land. Let’s look at the year in review.

  • Operator Guide book sprint was in February 2013 and I still remember it fondly. The before post and the after post tell the tale, as does this video.
  • Diane Fleming added a sidebar for navigating the every growing API reference site at http://api.openstack.org/api-ref.html. I’d like to see more improvements to the design for that page with more responsiveness for different devices.
  • We have improved the DocImpact commit message flag, where developers can add DocImpact to a commit message, and some automation happens in the background to automatically log a doc bug, setting it to New until the patch actually merges, eliminating a lot of manual steps. Props to Tom Fifield and Steven Deaton for this accomplishment in 2013.
  • We also were able to simultaneously release the docs with the code for the Havana release in the fall for the first time. A large part of this accomplishment is thanks to automation of the Configuration Reference, where the auto doc tool scrapes the docstrings and collects them into meaningful tables per feature per project.
  • This year included a complete reorganization of the docs.openstack.org site landing page. We also added new titles to try to accommodate new audiences. We have a new user guide and admin user guide, which walk through both the Dashboard and command-line interface procedures to accomplish common tasks like launching an instance. As I mentioned above, we’re also maintaining a new Configuration Reference which lists all possible configuration options across multiple OpenStack projects.
  • This year after the Summit in Portland, I worked with Lew Tucker’s finely tuned organization at Cisco to hire a contract writer dedicated to the upstream vanilla OpenStack install guide. There were still hiccups and delays despite having a dedicated resource, but the resulting install guide has been well-received.
  • We held a mid-release OpenStack Docs Boot Camp in sunny California at the Mirantis office. We learned a lot from each other and got to know contributors we hadn’t met in person.
  • In July 2013, the OpenStack security team put together a fantastic OpenStack Security Guide with a book sprint in an undisclosed location in Maryland. At least I think that’s where it was.They’re security conscious.
  • The High Availability Guide got some refreshing as well, thanks to Emilien Macchi and Enovance test labs.
  • We have Japanese fonts now supported in our tool chain, with Japanese translations now available on docs.openstack.org/ja/. Much appreciation to the translation team, especially the Japanese team lead Masanori Itoh, I18N team lead Daisy Guo, and David Cramer for the doc tooling for the font support.
  • Also in 2013 we have been incubating the open source training manuals team within the OpenStack Documentation program. They’ve produced an Associate Training Guide, with outlines and schedules for an Operator Training Guide, a Developer Training Guide, and an Architect Training Guide. All guides and outlines are available at http://docs.openstack.org/training-guides/content/.
  • At the Summit in Hong Kong we announced that the OpenStack Operations Guide became an O’Reilly edition and we are working on the edits coming back from our developmental editor.
  • Most recently we had a Doc Bug Day on 12/20/13 squashing over 80 bugs, following the sun from Australia to the US west coast and then some.

This past year OpenStack Documentation became an official program with me, Anne Gentle, elected as the Program Technical Lead. I hope to continue to serve and promote the Documentation efforts as we go into the new year. Yes, I do read the feedback from the user survey and I know we have work ahead of us. But for the docs to be second-most complained about instead of first-most was a moment to be celebrated in 2013. Thanks to the many contributors who make these incremental improvements happen.

Category: community, Documentation

OpenMic Spotlight: Sergey Lukjanov

SergeyThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Sergey Lukjanov is a Senior Software Engineer at Mirantis. He’s the Project Technical Leader of Savanna project and he focuses on Savanna, Infra and Oslo initiatives. Sergey is experienced in Big Data projects and technologies (Hadoop, HDFS, Cassandra, Twitter Storm, etc.) and enterprise-grade solutions. He’s contributing to different open source projects now, including Twitter Storm and OpenStack. Follow him on Twitter at @lukjanovsv

1. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

I think that it’s an enormous growth of both community and adoption. You can now see folks from totally different companies contributing to and using OpenStack.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job? 

That’s my initiative — to start coding and take part in different programmer-specific things. :) Unfortunately, there were not very helpful lessons in college. There was some kind of real wish to understand what it’s all about — and this wish is still with me. It’s so amazing to find solutions for problems that you couldn’t even think about yesterday, and to imagine what interesting tasks you’ll face tomorrow.

3. Where’s your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop? In bed? 

It depends, really. I always do a lot in the office, but there are many activities not connected with programming there like meetings, Launchpad, Gerrit things and so on. So, if we’re speaking about coding itself, I love doing that at home — usually with some coffee and cookies.

4. How did you first get involved in OpenStack?

OpenStack is our company’s main vector of development and future, so even when I was not completely involved in OpenStack projects, I spent time learning and understanding how it works. At that time, I was taking part in different Big Data initiatives including Twitter Storm, and I continued working on it as a part of the OpenStack ecosystem. I started working on OpenStack during early 2012. Creating an OpenStack cloud future is a big challenge for me, and I really appreciate that I have this opportunity.

5. Be honest – are you more likely to know your project collaborators by their IRC nic or their actual name?

Of course, by their real names. IRC nics are better than nothing, sure, but I’d like to know all of the guys I’m working with by their actual names, and see them in real life — not only on IRC meetings and calls. I know almost every Savanna contributor personally, and I believe that these simple human relationship are still really important to do the most effective job. On the other side, IRC nics are very useful for setting up auto highlights. ;)

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Dec 20 – 27)

OpenStack “J” naming poll closed

Polls closed, the OpenStack community decided: Juno will be the name of the OpenStack development cycle starting in May 2014, after the Icehouse cycle completes.

Third party testing with Turbo-Hipster

Soon you are going to see a new robot barista leaving comments on Nova code reviews. He is obsessed with espresso, that band you haven’t heard of yet, and easing the life of OpenStack operators.  Doing a large OpenStack deployment has always been hard when it came to database migrations. Running a migration requires downtime, and when you have giant datasets that downtime could be hours. To help catch these issues a new zuul worker called Turbo-Hipster will run your patchset’s migrations against copies of real databases. This will give you valuable feedback on the success of the patch, and how long it might take to migrate.

How to Upgrade an OpenStack Swift Cluster with No Downtime

OpenStack Swift deployers can upgrade from one version of Swift to the next with zero downtime for end users. This has been supported since the initial release of OpenStack Swift back in 2010.

OpenStack Project Update Webinars

To allow for broader participation, we’ve scheduled post-Summit webinars with the Project Team Leads (PTLs) to provide the latest project updates rather than schedule these tracks during the Summit. Next scheduled events:

Tuesday, January 7, 2013
7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Mark Washenberger, Image Service (Glance); Julien Danjou, Telemetry (Ceilometer); John Griffith, Block Storage (Cinder)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/4BC36YZQ

Thursday, January 9, 2013
Noon Pacific/3 p.m. Eastern*
Project team leads: Steve Baker, Orchestration (Heat) and David Lyle, Dashboard (Horizon)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/AXQYKMP7

Recorded session

Russell Bryant, Compute (Nova) and John Dickinson, Object Storage (Swift)

The recording of the session by Mark McClain, Networking (Neutron) and Dolph Mathews, Identity (Keystone) will be published as soon as possible.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Pentheus Jia Dong
Lee Li Yuanchao Sun
Sergey Nikitin Michael Krotscheck
Taurus Cheung JiaHao Li
Vadim Rovachev Haojie Jia
Tim Bell Bob Callaway
Stanislav Kudriashev Sergey Nikitin
Ken Perkins Dmitry Kulishenko
shihanzhang
Navid Shaikh
Jaume Devesa
Igor A. Lukyanenkov
Cedric Brandily
Feng Ju
Yanis Guenane
Mikhail Durnosvistov

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Watching the zuul queue testing my change

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Dec 13 – 20)

What Is VMware Up To With OpenStack?

As a former vSphere and now OpenStack Architect, Kenneth Hui has been following with much interest the courtship ritual that VMware has been performing with the OpenStack project.  Dan Wendlandt and the entire OpenStack Team at VMware has been busy courting the OpenStack community at various venues, including the recent OpenStack Summit.  For the Grizzly release, VMware began contributing code to integrate vSphere with OpenStack; the code contribution has steadily increased both in quantity and in scope moving into Havana and continuing into the upcoming Icehouse release. His views are based on his experience working with VMware and their products and observing their involvement in the OpenStack community (he doesn’t work at Vmware nor has any special inside knowledge).

OpenStack Project Update Webinars

To allow for broader participation, we’ve scheduled post-Summit webinars with the Project Team Leads (PTLs) to provide the latest project updates rather than schedule these tracks during the Summit. Next scheduled events:

Tuesday, January 7, 2013
7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Mark Washenberger, Image Service (Glance); Julien Danjou, Telemetry (Ceilometer); John Griffith, Block Storage (Cinder)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/4BC36YZQ

Thursday, January 9, 2013
Noon Pacific/3 p.m. Eastern*
Project team leads: Steve Baker, Orchestration (Heat) and David Lyle, Dashboard (Horizon)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/AXQYKMP7

Recorded session

Russell Bryant, Compute (Nova) and John Dickinson, Object Storage (Swift)

The recording of the session by Mark McClain, Networking (Neutron) and Dolph Mathews, Identity (Keystone) will be published as soon as possible.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Reports from previous events

Security Advisories and Notes

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Kiyoung Jung Matthew Macdonald-Wallace
Rodney Beede Mellanox External Testing
Robert C. Barth Ildiko Vancsa
Liz Blanchard Du Yujie
anusha rayani Dave Cahill
Matthew Fischer Dan Genin
Matt Fischer Zhang Jinnan
Cindy Pallares Qiming Teng
Bruce R. Montague Neutron Ryu
Nathan Kinder Devdatta
Dmitry Borodaenko Alexander Chudnovets
Malini Kamalambal Tail-f NCS Jenkins
Bob Callaway Ioram Schechtman Sette
Dmitri Krasnenko
Thomas Bechtold
Matthew D. Wood
Daniel Gollub
Andy Dugas
Matt Kassawara
Vijay Kumar Venkatachalam
Vitaliy Kolosov
Jeremy Salsman

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

tumblr_inline_mxin10s5xm1raprkq

The release manager allowing a feature during feature freeze

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

 

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Wang Pan

WangpanThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Wang Pan is a Senior Software Engineer for the private cloud at NetEase.com, working primarily on Nova (including cpu qos, libvirt driver for kvm, cloud monitor similar to ceilometer, EBS similar to cinder, etc.). You can follow him on Twitter at @Aspirer2004.

1. What is your go-to beverage or snack while coding?

Boiled water is the best beverage when coding.

2. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

Copy and paste the experts’ codes as much as possible.

3. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

Supported qemu-guest-agent in Nova, because that is my code. :) Thanks to all reviewers!

4. Be honest – are you more likely to know your project collaborators by their IRC nic or their actual name?

I prefer their actual name.

5. How many OpenStack t-shirts do you own, and which is your favorite?

I own only two, and I need more to pick a favorite.

Category: Open Mic

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