The OpenStack Blog

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 25 – May 2)

DefCore Core Capabilities Selection Criteria SIMPLIFIED -> how we are picking Core

Rob Hirschfeld summarizes the status of discussions within OpenStack community of what is ‘Openstack’. The effort is now summarized in a diagram showing the 12 criterias grouped in 4 main categories. Better go read Rob’s post, it’ll all make sense.

Announcing the O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide

O’Reilly has completed the production of the OpenStack Operations Guide: Set Up and Manage Your OpenStack Cloud. You can get your bits-n-bytes copy at http://docs.openstack.org/ops/ or order a dead-tree version on the O’Reilly site.

What It Means To Be In The OpenStack Community (One Member’s Take)

What is Kenneth Hui, Rackspace Technology Evangelist, deeply committed member of OpenStack, doing at a CloudStack conference? Read his blog post to find out what it means to be a good citizen of a community.

Results of the TC Election

Please join me in congratulating the 7 newly elected members of the TC: Thierry Carrez, Jay Pipes, Vishvananda Ishaya, Michael Still, Jim Blair, Mark McClain, Devananda van der Veen. Full results: Full results.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Christina Darretta Abhinav Agrawal
Sam Hague Gabriel Assis Bezerra
Obulapathi Michael Tupitsyn
yummy.bian Laurel Michaels
Tushar Gohad Karin Levenstein
Karin Levenstein Baohua Yang
Andrew James
Tushar Gohad

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

1396717999811

When doing a recheck and falling on an another bug

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Lucas Gomes

lucasgomes_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Lucas works for Red Hat on the OpenStack Ironic project as a core developer. He was born in Brazil, but currently lives in Dublin, Ireland. When not playing with computers he likes traveling, hiking and reading fantasy books.

1. How would you explain your job to your grandmother?

Well… I can definitely try.

Grandma, let’s think for a moment that you’re a computer, a special type of computer… you’re a computer that make cakes and today you’re going to try a new cake recipe written by me.

My job is to write that cake recipe, and for that I start by listing out all the ingredients that my cake needs. Then, below that, I write a step-by-step guide that tells you what to do with those ingredients: mix, mash, stir, bake, etc…when I’m finished, I’m going to hand my new recipe to you (the computer) and you’re going to follow the instructions to make me a cake.

I think that might work.

2. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

I would say TripleO. In my opinion, one of the biggest hurdles to OpenStack adoption is how difficult it is to install and configure it. TripleO is here to solve that problem, but it goes beyond. It’s also about upgrades, continuous integration, deployment and a reference architecture. I think that having a fully integrated, upstream way to install, upgrade and operate OpenStack will make a big impact.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

For me, open source is the right thing to do. It gives you access to a community that is working towards a common goal and not wasting time reinventing the wheel. So, the open source methodology just works, and works better.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I quite enjoy working from home and I think I’m more productive because of the lack of interruptions. But I also like the fact that once per week I can get to meet with other Red Hat folks in the Dublin office to socialize and to learn a tad more about what everyone is currently working on.

5. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

The openstack-dev mail-list. For the rest I mostly use Google Plus. It’s nicely integrated with my email interface, so I pretty much rely on following the right people that are relevant to the areas I care about.

Category: Open Mic

Announcing the O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide

Er, what’s this? An O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide offered side-by-side with the continuously-published OpenStack Operations Guide? Yes, your eyes do not deceive you, O’Reilly has completed the production of the OpenStack Operations Guide: Set Up and Manage Your OpenStack Cloud. You can get your bits-n-bytes copy at http://docs.openstack.org/ops/ or order a dead-tree version on the O’Reilly site.

oreilly-openstack-ops-guide

This book was a complete community effort with a bit of a twist: we held a five-day book sprint back in February 2013 with the seven original authors and one book sprint facilitator, Adam Hyde. We wrote and wrote and wrote some more, then edited and glued it all together so that we had a 240 page book by Friday afternoon. The book got quite a bit of love and attention for the next year or so, and in February 2014 we held a mini-sprint with the original authors to update the book for the Havana release and to address developmental edits from our O’Reilly editors, led by Brian Anderson and first introduced by Andy Oram. In the developmental edit, we added a new architecture with RedHat using OpenStack Networking (neutron) as an alternative to Ubuntu with legacy networking, nova-network. We tested a process for upgrading from Grizzly to Havana in a new upgrades chapter. We also added a lot of network troubleshooting information. There’s a new “Havana Haunted by the Dead” tale from the crypt/cloud. We included an expanded glossary as well. Also an exciting addition to a book nerd like myself is the index.

As mentioned in the book itself, we appreciate the 50-plus contributors who support this book and the tool chains around it. Reviews, continuous builds, output, and translations are all an important part of this book’s surrounding systems.

The following people are contributors in the many methods it takes to create a book in the community: Akihiro Motoki, Alejandro Avella, Alexandra Settle, Andreas Jaeger, Andy McCallum, Benjamin Stassart, Beth Cohen, Chandan Kumar, Chris Ricker, David Cramer, David Wittman, Denny Zhang, Emilien Macchi, Gauvain Pocentek, Ignacio Barrio, James E. Blair, Jay Clark, Jeff White, Jeremy Stanley, K Jonathan Harker, KATO Tomoyuki, Lana Brindley, Laura Alves, Lee Li, Lukasz Jernas, Mario B. Codeniera, Matthew Kassawara, Michael Still, Monty Taylor, Nermina Miller, Nigel Williams, Phil Hopkins, Russell Bryant, Sahid Orentino Ferdjaoui, Sandy Walsh, Sascha Peilicke, Sean M. Collins, Sergey Lukjanov, Shilla Saebi, Stephen Gordon, Steven Deaton, Summer Long, Uwe Stuehler, Vaibhav Bhatkar, Veronica Musso, Ying Chun “Daisy” Guo, Zhengguang Ou, and ZhiQiang Fan.

We want to be sure you read this book and log bugs and perhaps even fix some yourself if you’re so inclined! You can read how to on the OpenStack wiki. We also have the OpenStack Security Guide, written in a five day book sprint in June 2013. And we won’t stop there! Plans are underway for a third book to be written with a five day book sprint to help people design OpenStack clouds for many use cases.

We’ll continue to update these books using our community tool chain. We greatly appreciate the support from the OpenStack Foundation and O’Reilly to give the OpenStack Operations Guide that professional polish it deserves.

Category: Communication, OpenStack Update, Uncategorized

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 18 – 25)

Gerrit downtime and upgrade on 2014-04-28

The OpenStack infra team has been working to put everything in place so that we can upgrade review.o.o from Gerrit version 2.4.4 to version 2.8.4 We are happy to announce that we are finally ready to make it happen! We will begin the upgrade on Monday, April 28th at 1600 UTC (the OpenStack recommended ‘off’ week).

OpenStack gets lots of students this summer

The selection’s results are in and OpenStack is adding 10 new people working on our awesome project. Please join me and welcome students from Google Summer of Code and Outreach Program for Women.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Karin Levenstein William C. Arnold
Aleksandra Fedorova Rajeev Grover
Rajeev Grover Graham Hayes
Megan Rossetti Erik Colnick
Robert Nettleton
Megan Rossetti

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

It's magick

When looking over sqlalchemy migration code to see how it works

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication

OpenStack gets lots of students this summer

The selection’s results are in and OpenStack is adding 10 new people working on our awesome project. Please join me and welcome students from Google Summer of Code and Outreach Program for Women:

  • Artem Shepelev
  • Kumar Rishabh
  • Manishanker Talusani
  • Masaru Nomura
  • Prashanth Raghu
  • Tzanetos Balitsaris
  • Victoria Martínez de la Cruz
  • Virginia Gresham
  • Ana Malagon
  • Nataliia Uvarova

and their awesome mentors Debojyoti Dutta, Yathiraj Udupi, Boris Pavlovic, Hugh Saunders, Sriram, Joshua Hesketh, Arnaud Legendre, Fei Long Wang, Alejandro Cabrera, Mikhail Dubov, Flavio Percoco, Liz Blanchard, Ju Lim, Eoghan Glynn. Mentors do an important job for the community: if you recognize any of their names in Atlanta, show them your appreciation for helping young students get accustomed to the “OpenStack way”.

Category: Communication, community

Open Mic Spotlight: Simon Pasquier

simonpasquier_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Simon has been an OpenStack Active Technical Contributor since early 2013 when I joined the XLcloud project. XLcloud is a collaborative project (funded by the French government) that involves academics and companies. It aims at demonstrating the feasibility of High Performance Cloud Computing platform based on OpenStack. More specifically, we’re looking at remote rendering, autoscaling, capacity planning and plenty of other cool stuff. Prior to this, my background was with Linux systems and networking. It proved to be a perfect fit for OpenStack where, sometimes you have to get your hands dirty to make it work. :-) 

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

For me, Heat is going to get a lot of attention because orchestration is a no-brainer when you deploy complex infrastructures in the cloud (like XLcloud does for virtual clusters). The Heat team is definitely committed to building a great service, and also very careful to integrate with other initiatives such as TOSCA.

Most of all, the guys are very responsive and friendly with newcomers.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I studied mostly C and C++ in college but I’ve learned much more during my professional life. I’ve used different languages before Python (Ruby, Perl, Javascript) and I find it very helpful. To be a good developer, you don’t need to know a language at your fingertips, but rather take out the best of every community.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

For me, it is all about collaboration and not simply sharing the code. What is important is to recognize any contribution: coding (of course) as well as testing, bug reporting and documentation. Making decisions in the open is also a key component.

Even though there’s a lot of space for improvement, OpenStack encompasses this vision and pushed the “open source” paradigm one step further (see how it has inspired other projects such as OpenDaylight). Finally working on open source projects is a great way to improve your technical and human skills.

4. What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

At the first OpenStack Rhone-Alpes meetup, Gavin Brebner from HP Cloud did a great presentation explaining how the Q&A team was testing, qualifying and stressing their infrastructure. The talk was really enlightening as he listed all the challenges you have to tackle for keeping a large cloud up and running.

5. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

Planet OpenStack and the openstack-dev list, of course. :-)

But I’ve got plenty of other blogs in my reader:

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 11 – 18)

OpenStack Icehouse is here

OpenStack Icehouse, the ninth release of the open source software for building public, private, and hybrid clouds, has nearly 350 new features to support software development, managing data and application infrastructure at scale. The OpenStack community continues to attract the best developers and experts in their disciplines with 1,202 individuals employed by more than 120 organizations contributing to the Icehouse release.

Running with scissors > DefCore “must-pass” Road Show Starts [VIDEOS]

The OpenStack DefCore committee has been very active during this cycle turning the core definition principles into an actual list of “must-pass” capabilities (working page).  This in turn gives the community something tangible enough to review and evaluate.

PTL Election Conclusion and Results

Thank you to the electorate, to all those who voted and to all candidates who put their name forward for PTL for this election. A healthy, open process breeds trust in our decision making capability – thank you to all those who make this process possible.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Mohammed Naser Roger Luethi
Shweta Patil Trump.Zhang
Shiori Toyoshima Sagar Ratnakara Nikam
Florian Robert Mizielski
Sandhya Balakrishnan Ray Chen
Jeff Shantz Adambuntu
Paul Ward Nayna Patel
AlexConrad Dwight Hubbard
Roger Luethi Vladimir Kuklin
Rajdeep Vitaly Kramskikh
Cristian Tomoiaga Swaminathan Vasudevan
john brooker Ryan McNair
bruceSz Mohammed Naser
Mike Scherbakov Evgeniy L
Dougal Matthews Dmitry Pyzhov
Chad Roberts Aleksey Kasatkin
Vitalii Éric Araujo
Jay Dobies Don Domingo
Coleman Corrigan Chinmaya Bharadwaj
Jonathan LaCour
Pranesh
Anastasia Kuznetsova

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

when it’s the release day

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Joshua Hesketh

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Joshua Hesketh is a software developer for Rackspace Australia working on upstream OpenStack. He works from his home in Hobart, Tasmania. Joshua is currently President of Linux Australia, previously the co-chair for PyCon Australia and a key organizer for linux.conf.au. He has an interest in robotics having recently completed a degree in mechatronic engineering. Check out his blog here

1. Finish the sentences. OpenStack is great for _______. OpenStack is bad for ______.

OpenStack is great for freedom. OpenStack is bad for proprietary competitors.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I’m self-taught – which might explain some of my bad habits! I learned a bit during university while picking up most of my knowledge from being involved in open source projects.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

To me, open source is a superior development model in which everybody wins – from the users, to the developers and businesses involved. Much more value can be gained from using open source where you can build on the shoulders of giants, collaborate on complicated problems and avoid vendor lock-ins. As users you have the flexibility to use a product to its fullest potential whilst, as developers, having the ability to modify and customize it as needed.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I love working from home. I get to wake up to this view every morning. When I’m not at my home office I spend hours at my favourite cafe, Villino, working while enjoying a flat white.

joshview

5What drew you to OpenStack?

One of the big drawcards for me is the community within OpenStack which is really special. It’s such a large and active project, with hundreds of developers all working in unison. The sense of community is reflected in everyone being nice, approachable and willing to go out of their way to help solve your problem. Everybody is working towards the same goal – to better OpenStack.

This is one of the great success stories of the project – being able to scale its developer base so well. Granted, there are still issues in the getting started pipeline as a consequence of size, but overall the project is very well managed. I am a very big fan of the structure and operation of the OpenStack Foundation. The membership models and egalitarianism are very well set out.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Apr 4 – 11)

Take the OpenStack User Survey and Change the (OpenStack) World

Still a few more hours to fill in the OpenStack User Survey.

Heartbleed

The bug discovered affecting OpenSSL and “breaking” internet doesn’t directly touch OpenStack but can lead to OpenStack compromise. The width of the problem discovered this week is extremely wide though and I think it’s worth spending some more time learning about it. Mark McLoughlin has collected an impressive amount of links where you can learn more.

Security auditing of OpenStack releases

Nathan Kinder started a conversation about how to deal with high-level security related questions about OpenStack.

How to govern a project on the scale of OpenStack

How an open source project is governed can matter just as much as the features it supports, the speed at which it runs, or the code that underlies it. Some open source projects have what I call a “benevolent dictator for life.” Others are outgrowths of corporate projects that, while open, still have their goals and code led by the company that manages it. And of course, there are thousands of projects out there that are written and managed by a single person or a small group of people for whom governance is less of an issue than insuring project sustainability.

Introducing the OpenStack SDK for PHP

Marrying OpenStack with one of the most popular programming languages on the planet. Write applications to interact with OpenStack public and private clouds, using the APIs. The OpenStack SDK for PHP is meant to be by the community and for the community. It will be able to work with clouds from a variety of vendors or vanilla OpenStack setups.

Tearing down obstacles to OpenStack documentation contributions

Rip. Shred. Tear. Let’s gather up the obstacles to documentation contribution and tear them down one by one. I’ve designed a survey with the help of the OpenStack docs team to determine blockers for docs contributions. If you’ve contributed to OpenStack, please fill it out.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Jason Kincl Manish Godara
Choe, Cheng-Dae Jason Ni
Juan Antonio Osorio Robles vishal yadav
Peter Jönsson Amrith
vaibhav Doug Shelley
Victor Boivie Aimon Bustardo
Marc Abramowitz Igor Duarte Cardoso

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack 2014 T-Shirt Design Winner

The colorful design will debut on T-Shirts at PyCon in Montreal this week, and will be distributed at upcoming events worldwide.

‘Glowing stack’ by Jaewin Ong

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

 

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Steve Martinelli

steve_martinelliThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Steve Martinelli is an OpenStack Active Technical Contributor and a Keystone Core Developer located at the IBM Canada Lab. He primarily focuses on enabling Keystone to better integrate into enterprise environments. Steve was responsible for adding OAuth support to Keystone and is currently adding Federated Identity support to Keystone. In his spare time he also contributes to OpenStackClient as a Core Developer. Though usually swamped with code reviews, his summer Wednesday nights are reserved for playing in the IBM softball league. You can follow him on Twitter @stevebot

1. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku!

Here’s a haiku:

Code, test, submit patch.
Oh no, forgot to rebase.
Jenkins, I failed you.

If we’re talking gifs, I can’t compete with: http://openstackreactions.enovance.com/.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

I learned to code at school, but I’ve learned how to support, test, and build projects while working. When learning a new language, I avoid using books. I generally use an online tutorial to get a development environment up and running, then have the API handy while I poke around. When getting ramped up on an existing project, like Keystone, I find that going through the code, documentation, and running the test suite with a debugger enabled is enormously helpful.

3. What does “open source” mean to you?

My inner developer wants to say … ‘Free as in Beer, Speech and Love’: http://www.flickr.com/photos/joshuamckenty/6747269389/

But, I’ve learned that it’s much more than that. ‘Open source’ software can drive and accelerate an industry. It can ensure many companies agree upon a standard, and move on to the more interesting aspects of what the technology can do.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

It depends on what I’m doing that day. If it’s something that requires a lot of thinking, then I like to work from my desk at home, where it’s relatively free of distractions, and very quiet. If I’m just dabbling in code, or working on something more ‘mechanical’, then I’m good as long as I have a place to sit.

 5What is your favorite example of OpenStack in production (besides yours, of course!) 

I really like what the folks at CERN are doing. They are really pushing for Keystone to have Federated Identity support. Plus, who doesn’t like smashing subatomic particles together at nearly the speed of light?!

Category: Open Mic

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