The OpenStack Blog

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Taking Stock of OpenStack’s Rapid Growth

With another successful OpenStack Summit in the books, I wanted to take a minute to reflect on three big areas of maturity that are rapidly emerging for the project: user maturity, software maturity and a focus on cloud operations.

Users Take Center Stage

First, it has become increasingly clear that the number of new users and the growth of existing ones marks a turning point for OpenStack. New users like Disney and Wells Fargo are stepping up to talk about how OpenStack figures into their agile infrastructure plans, advocating for the project and encouraging their vendors to come along for the ride.

ATT

At the same time, existing users like AT&T, Comcast and Bloomberg are expanding their footprints. Comcast’s is footprint now 5x larger than what they talked about in Portland just one year ago. Bloomberg is now in production. They’re all participating actively in the community, both as upstream contributors (Comcast was a top 20 contributor to the Icehouse release) and as operators.

On the other end of the spectrum, smaller organizations like Budd Van Lines, DigitalFilm Tree, BioIQ, and government agencies like the USDA have stepped onto the Summit stage to talk about their use of OpenStack and the workloads they’re running. Check out the playlist of user presentations on YouTube.

Users are important. Critical, in fact. To that point, some observers obsess over how many OpenStack users are visible. In 2012, they asked, “Where are the big companies?” Then, AT&T, Comcast and eBay raised their hands. Last year, they asked, “But, where are the enterprises?” Then, companies like Disney, Sony, Wells Fargo, Bloomberg and Fidelity raised their hands.

Now, the question they ask is, “But where are the companies of all sizes and industries, running OpenStack at scale, for all workloads, in production, with specifics and details?” And as more users start raising their hands, they’ll find something else to chirp about.

Where are the users? They were in Atlanta last week, and the people who were there saw them. The summit in Atlanta attracted more than 4,500 attendees from 55 countries:

  • Two of the top three entertainment companies were there and spoke about using OpenStack (Disney and Time Warner).
  • Five of the seven largest telcos were in Atlanta and the top three (AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast) talked about their deployments.
  • About a third of the Fortune 100 was represented in Atlanta, as users, devs, operators, vendors or participants.
  • 39% of commercial banks in the Fortune 500 were present in Atlanta, including the top three. Six of the top eight were present.
  • More than two dozen users spoke at the Summit, in keynotes, solo presentations, panels, and vendor sessions.

When we talk about users, it’s not just about trotting out a list of names. It’s about what these users are doing with the software. Some, like Wells Fargo, are just getting started. Others, like AT&T, are well along the learning curve. But the bottom line is that we’re interested in how they are using OpenStack to grow, compete and do new things. These users are leaders in our community, and they’re making their voices heard.

Superuser Art

We don’t just have users. We have advocates. They’re users, developers, operators and vendors. We have community members. They’re engaged. And they’re changing how IT is done.

A new tool we launched last week to share stories about how users are engaged and using OpenStack to transform their organizations is the Superuser publication. Superusers are not large companies or even large deployments, necessarily. Rather, they’re the individuals who are taking the lead in their organizations to stay competitive in an economy that moves more rapidly every day.

As we move toward the next Summit in Paris this fall, our community will continue to focus on what users care about: a community to continuously improve the software and share best operational practices, a publication to merchandise use cases, and a marketplace of products and services they can tap into when they’re ready.

Honing the Code in Response to the User

Even with all the momentum and engagement around users, there’s a factor driving OpenStack’s adoption that’s equal in value. It’s the focus that our community has embraced with regard to hardening the code and on operations excellence.

Sony user story

An obvious case in point here is OpenStack Networking (Neutron). Sony is an active user who made clear last week several specific steps that need to be taken to harden Neutron. They weren’t the only user/operator with specific points of improvement to include in the upcoming Juno release.  As a result, look at the roadmap. User and operator feedback is now in the plan.

It’s a trend in the works since Hong Kong, when the plans were laid for such user and operator-focused features as rolling upgrades in Compute and federated identity management via the Identity Service.

Cloud Operators Engage With the Community

In Atlanta, we held our first operator working sessions during the day and a half Ops Meetup. More than 200 people who run OpenStack clouds showed up to share best practices and improve the practice of operating clouds built on OpenStack. Dozens of these operators have volunteered to organize working groups within the community to keep the feedback loop throughout the next development cycle.

Ops Meetup PTLs Intro

This new level of engagement is key to improving the OpenStack experience. Operators understand what it takes to make a cloud perform and meet the service levels users expect. Operators see how users actually use the cloud, and they have a view of application performance that can help improve the infrastructure in ways that devs and end users might not intuitively grasp.

The Software-Defined Economy, Delivered by OpenStack

We are now living in the software-defined economy.

No matter what size your organization is, it must move faster. Supply chain and IP advantages are fleeting and costly; organizations are realizing that continuous software innovation is critical in terms of building and preserving competitive advantage.

Companies are trying to figure out how to leverage their developers to make this happen. OpenStack is the infrastructure platform more and more of these companies are choosing to give their developers the tools they need to bring agility to a completely new paradigm of software development.

Software supported by agile infrastructure makes rapid innovation a reality, and the OpenStack community is making agile infrastructure a reality for a growing number of companies.

And the stakes couldn’t be higher. According to an analysis by Richard Foster, on average, an S&P 500 company is now being replaced about once every two weeks, either because of market cap decline or acquisition. And the churn rate of companies has been accelerating over time.

Corporations in the S&P 500 in 1958 lasted in the index for 61 years, on average. By 1980, the average tenure had shrunk to about 25 years. Today, it stands at just 18 years based on seven year rolling averages.

At the current churn rate, 75% of the S&P 500 will be replaced by 2027.

All this is at the heart of why every company either is a technology company or is becoming one. Users of OpenStack are putting software at the center of their strategies to do just that.

Upcoming OpenStack Day Events in May & June!

Did you miss the Atlanta Summit? Did you attend the Summit and now have new stories to tell?

There are several OpenStack events taking place near you over the next few weeks. Come join us to share outcomes of the Juno Design Summit, hear about new use cases and have direct conversations with industry and technical leaders. Space is limited, so register soon!

CEE Day 2014 FB graphic
OpenStack CEE Day in Budapest
Franz Meyer will kick off OpenStack CEE Day with Monday’s keynote, followed by several breakout sessions and workshop tracks offering hands on labs from OpenStack experts.
When: Monday, May 26, 8:30am – 5pm
Where: Urania National Movie Theatre
Tickets: €50.00
Featured Speakers:
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Franz Meyer, Red Hat
  • Alan Kavanagh, Ericsson
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • AND more!

openstackinaction5

Attendees will be provided with an overview of the OpenStack technology, project updates, challenges, best practices and see how the roadmap is tailored for its different audiences. Admission is free!
When: Wednesday, May 28, 8:30am – 7pm
Where: CAP 15
Featured Speakers:
  • Raphaël Ferreira, eNovance
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Bryan Che, Red Hat
  • Mark McClain, Yahoo
  • Patrick Hamon, Dell
  • AND more!

OpenStack_Italy

A one-day event to share the latest trends, news, services, use cases regarding the main open cloud software community.The morning session is focused on the OpenStack latest news and case histories; the afternoon is dedicated to technical workshops and use cases.
When: Friday, May 30, 9am – 6pm
Where: Via Privata Stefanardo de Vimercate
Featured Speakers:
  • Mariano Cunietti, Enter
  • Chris Jackson, Rackspace
  • Giuseppe Capaldo, HP Italia
  • Michael Kienle, IT-Novum
  • Vincenzo di Somma, Canonical
  • Salvatore Orlando, VMware
  • AND more!

OpenStack Israel

OpenStack Israel in Tel Aviv-Yafo
Hear about OpenStack’s Icehouse Release from industry thought leaders and local OpenStack users. Following the conference, you can attend a 3-day training course on the current OpenStack Icehouse Release.
When: Monday, June 2, 8:30am – 5pm
Where: Arts Hall HaBama Herzliya
Featured Speakers:
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • Thierry Carrez, OpenStack Foundation
  • Mark McLoughlin, Red Hat

OS Day - London

OpenStack UK Day in London
After keynotes from Canonical, SolidFire and vArmour, afternoon sessions will explore user case studies, industry best practices, and technical talks from OpenStack tech leads.
When: Wednesday, June 4, starting at 8:30am
Where: 155 Bishopsgate
Tickets: £50.00 + VAT when you use this discount code: OS14EB
Featured Speakers:

  • Mark Collier, OpenStack Foundation
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • Mark McClain, Yahoo
  • Chris Jackson, Rackspace
  • Boris Devouge, HP
  • AND more!

If you have any questions, please contact events@openstack.org.

Atlanta Summit, Day 4: New Skills, Bigger Goals

photo-4

In a room full of users, 4 trainers and and army of volunteers walked through, step by step, how to create, manage and delete an instance, as well as networking, user management, and how to use different storage services available in OpenStack.

“We want to get you playing around with Horizon. We aren’t making any assumptions. We want to start you from 0.”

Twenty minutes after the workshop began, the presenters asked, how many of you have an instance up and running? The entire room raised their hands and presenters applauded them.

Over the course of the ninety minute session, the trainers took the participants through exercises below to learn how to use the command line clients and the Horizon dashboard to set up identity, compute, creating containers, uploading and downloading objects, networking, block storage, image store.

photo-5

Getting Started with OpenStack

Two sessions on the fourth day of the summit provided a space for new users install OpenStack on their own, to spin up their own instances. In the session, “OpenStack from Zero to Nova: An Activity-Driven Workshop,” each participant was given their own self-contained all-in-one OpenStack cloud environment.

In another hands-on session, “Getting Started with OpenStack,” participants walked through each of the OpenStack components and were given suggestions and resources for learning OpenStack. In the session, participants set up a multi-node OpenStack cloud, on their laptops.

You Sir, Sir Vey

One of the most anticipated sessions of each summit is the discussion around the user survey results.

Reactions to the user survey:

@cote Looking through recent OpenStack user survey (http://slidesha.re/1mvlNv6 ). It’d be awesome to see this level of detail for other cloud platforms

@dmavrakis Telecoms accounts for 6% of OpenStack installations slideshare.net/ryan-lane/open… Perhaps sample was IT biased though.

@drzeydy My favorite part of #OpenStackSummit: OpenStack Atlanta User Survey

Don’t Miss

OpenStack Summit Keynote & Session Video Footage: Video content through has been uploaded to the OpenStack YouTube channel. Check out the footage here.

From Around The Web

How OpenStack Is Aiming to Win the Enterprise
VIDEO: Allan Clark, chairman of the board at the OpenStack Foundation, discusses new initiatives from the open-source cloud platform.

How to Use OpenStack in Your Small Business
The OpenStack cloud platform works well for companies that aim to deploy software or infrastructure as a service but remain wary of doing so using using public cloud services.

Embracing the user at OpenStack Summit Atlanta
There’s something different about OpenStack Summit Atlanta. Maybe it’s the attendance, the new arrivals, the latest projects, the announcements, the talks, or the community coming together.

Clarification re: Board Activity

Today the OpenStack Foundation is releasing the following statement:

“The OpenStack Foundation is aware of media reports that discuss the commercial activities of Red Hat and other OpenStack vendors. The Board has not met to discuss this issue, nor has the Board taken a formal position on the issue. Although certain Board members in their individual capacity have commented on the issue, they are not representing the views of the OpenStack Foundation, which would require Board action. The Board has not scheduled a meeting on the issue, but may discuss it at the next scheduled Board meeting. All questions should be directed to Jonathan Bryce, the Executive Director of the Foundation. “

As noted, you may direct questions to me:  Jonathan@openstack.org

OpenStack Superuser

Today, we’re announcing the beginning of something new and exciting for OpenStack.

Superuser is a new online publication dedicated to the experiences of individuals who are running OpenStack clouds of all sizes, across all industries.

Topics will range from very actionable how-tos, case studies and architecture profiles to tackling less-tangible, strategic initiatives such as culture change, dev/ops, cost and vendor management.

Why are we launching a new publication?

One of the biggest benefits of the OpenStack community is the opportunity for knowledge sharing and collaborative problem solving among peers. There is a growing community of systems administrators, engineers and cloud architects and who are now running OpenStack in production and are eager to share their stories, compare notes, and have frank conversations about the problems they’re encountering and how to solve them.

Because the community is so large, distributed and fast-moving, it’s easy to duplicate efforts, and valuable information doesn’t always make it from one user group meetup conversation to the next design summit session. Based on feedback from the user community, we think there’s an opportunity for the Foundation to help aggregate content and create a destination specifically for OpenStack operators.

Our goals are to:

1) engage and help create a forum for the operator community

2) aggregate the vast amount of content being created and shared in various locations

3) promote and recruit participation for our community resources like documentation, the operations and security guides, training, and ask.openstack.org.

How will the publication be delivered?

Superuser will be an online publication that lives at superuser.openstack.org.

We aim to produce approximately three unique pieces of content per week — including news stories, topical feature stories, case studies, video interviews, and Q&As with operators — supported by a breadth of curated content that will be syndicated from the blogs/channels and our user community, ecosystem and analyst community.

How can you get involved?

We’re seeking the involvement of community members like you to help us shape the editorial direction, identify leads, make connections and contribute content. Your job will be to help us listen, and to make sure we’re giving a platform to the right voices.

Send us an idea for a story, a link to something the community should know, provide feedback to editor@openstack.org.

Subscribe to our newsletter, where we’ll periodically send you a digest of the latest Superuser happenings.

We’ve enlisted the help of volunteers in the community who have experience running OpenStack clouds to serve as members of our Editorial Advisory Board.

If you’re interested in helping shape the content, please subscribe to our editorial team mailing list[link]. This is where we will discuss story ideas, review editorial calendars, and solicit feedback from our editorial advisors and the user community.

The road ahead

“This publication was built to chronicle the work of superusers, and their many accomplishments personally, professionally, and organizationally. Our goal is to amplify their impact. Over the coming weeks and months, we’ll bring superusers together to share their stories, and in so doing help shape this new economy in a way that benefits us all.”

Check out Jonathan’s inaugural Superuser post, where he talks more about why Superuser was started, and what’s in store for the community and the publication.

And above all, we’re proud to introduce Superuser!

Countdown to the May 2014 OpenStack Summit

The May 2014 OpenStack Summit in Atlanta Kicks Off in 3 Days!

Continue to check OpenStack.org/Summit for updated information.

Summit Schedule
The main conference will run Monday through Thursday, and the Design Summit (developer working sessions) will run Tuesday through Friday. Arrive early on Monday to make sure you don’t miss any of the keynote action!

Registration Check-In Information

Skip the lines & pick up your badge early – registration begins on Sunday, May 11th at 3pm on Level 4 of the Georgia World Congress Center. Registration check-in will also be available throughout the week during the following times:

  • Sunday, May 11, 3pm – 7pm
  • Monday, May 12, 7am – 8pm
  • Tuesday, May 13, 7am – 6:30pm
  • Wednesday, May 14,  7:15am – 6pm
Not yet Registered? It’s not too Late!
  • Online Registration is now CLOSED but you can still register to attend the Summit onsite in Atlanta during the above listed registration hours.
New Summit Mobile App!
Plan ahead & streamline your Summit experience by downloading the official mobile app! Within the app, you can:
  • View the main conference & design summit schedules
  • Navigate maps of the GWCC, including breakout sessions and the expo hall
  • Chat with other Summit attendees
  • Participate in our expo hall booth crawl gamification & more!
  • Apple users download here & Android users download here
Local Train Transportation from Airport (MARTA)
MARTA’s airport station is attached to the airport, right off baggage claim. One-way fares are only $2.50 and within 20 minutes, you can be downtown.

  • Arriving passengers should follow the Ground Transportation signs to MARTA. The entrance to MARTA’s Airport Station is located inside the western end of the airport’s main terminal. Faregates are just a few feet from the baggage claim areas, just follow the signs.
  • To travel to the Omni Hotel and the GWCC: Take the train north to the Five Points Station. Take a westbound train 1 stop to CNN/GWCC Station. Take the escalator or elevator up and walk through the CNN building to hotel entrance.
  • To travel to the Westin: Take the train north to the Peachtree Center Station. Follow the signs to the Harris Street exit. Once exiting the fare gate, follow the signs pointing to Peachtree Street West. This exit will put you on the same side of the street as the hotel.
  • To travel to the Hyatt: Take the train north to the Peachtree Center Station. Follow the signs to the Harris Street exit. After exiting the fare gate, follow the signs to the Peachtree Street East. At street level, turn right to walk along Peachtree Street and walk a block to reach the Hyatt.
Summit Venue & Walking Directions
The Summit will take place at the GWCC. You can find a helpful map to navigate the venue here.
  • It is a short walking distance from the Omni, Westin and Hyatt hotels in downtown Atlanta.
  • From the Omni: Head southeast on Marietta St and turn right on Andrew Young International Blvd. The GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 5 minutes)
  • From the Westin: Head west on Andrew Young International Blvd. Walk half a mile and the GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 10 minutes)
  • From the Hyatt: Head south on Peachtree St and turn right on Andrew Young International Blvd. Walk half a mile and the GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 15 minutes)
Play to Win in the New OpenStack Booth Crawl QR Code Challenge!
New this year, we are hosting a challenge during the Booth Crawl Happy Hour on Monday, May 12. The grand prize winner will receive a Full Access Pass to the next OpenStack Summit in Paris (Nov 3-8, 2014) and a complimentary hotel room in Paris for 4 nights during the Summit.

OpenStack Photo Booth
Come capture your OpenStack Summit moment at our new photo booth in the hallway on Level 2. Write a message, snap a photo, take a piece of the Summit, share it with your Twitter and Facebook communities and print a copy to display in the OpenStack Marketplace Expo Hall.

Blogger Lounge
Are You a Blogger?  New this year we’ve created a Blogger Lounge – a quiet space for bloggers and media to write and share posts covering the Summit.  Look for it on Level 2 (Room B208).

Evening Events
Round out your Summit Experience & Have Fun at the Official Evening Events!
Stay Connected
Follow @OpenStack on Twitter for more updates, and join the conversation by using #OpenStack

 

OpenStack Summit Code of Conduct
The OpenStack Foundation is dedicated to providing an inclusive and safe Summit experience for everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, nationality or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of Summit participants in any form.  Summit exhibitors in the expo hall, evening party hosts and organizers of related Summit activities should be aware they are also subject to the code of conduct. Please make sure you review the Code of Conduct, which provides contact information for Foundation staff should you have any questions or need to report an issue.

Announcing the O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide

Er, what’s this? An O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide offered side-by-side with the continuously-published OpenStack Operations Guide? Yes, your eyes do not deceive you, O’Reilly has completed the production of the OpenStack Operations Guide: Set Up and Manage Your OpenStack Cloud. You can get your bits-n-bytes copy at http://docs.openstack.org/ops/ or order a dead-tree version on the O’Reilly site.

oreilly-openstack-ops-guide

This book was a complete community effort with a bit of a twist: we held a five-day book sprint back in February 2013 with the seven original authors and one book sprint facilitator, Adam Hyde. We wrote and wrote and wrote some more, then edited and glued it all together so that we had a 240 page book by Friday afternoon. The book got quite a bit of love and attention for the next year or so, and in February 2014 we held a mini-sprint with the original authors to update the book for the Havana release and to address developmental edits from our O’Reilly editors, led by Brian Anderson and first introduced by Andy Oram. In the developmental edit, we added a new architecture with RedHat using OpenStack Networking (neutron) as an alternative to Ubuntu with legacy networking, nova-network. We tested a process for upgrading from Grizzly to Havana in a new upgrades chapter. We also added a lot of network troubleshooting information. There’s a new “Havana Haunted by the Dead” tale from the crypt/cloud. We included an expanded glossary as well. Also an exciting addition to a book nerd like myself is the index.

As mentioned in the book itself, we appreciate the 50-plus contributors who support this book and the tool chains around it. Reviews, continuous builds, output, and translations are all an important part of this book’s surrounding systems.

The following people are contributors in the many methods it takes to create a book in the community: Akihiro Motoki, Alejandro Avella, Alexandra Settle, Andreas Jaeger, Andy McCallum, Benjamin Stassart, Beth Cohen, Chandan Kumar, Chris Ricker, David Cramer, David Wittman, Denny Zhang, Emilien Macchi, Gauvain Pocentek, Ignacio Barrio, James E. Blair, Jay Clark, Jeff White, Jeremy Stanley, K Jonathan Harker, KATO Tomoyuki, Lana Brindley, Laura Alves, Lee Li, Lukasz Jernas, Mario B. Codeniera, Matthew Kassawara, Michael Still, Monty Taylor, Nermina Miller, Nigel Williams, Phil Hopkins, Russell Bryant, Sahid Orentino Ferdjaoui, Sandy Walsh, Sascha Peilicke, Sean M. Collins, Sergey Lukjanov, Shilla Saebi, Stephen Gordon, Steven Deaton, Summer Long, Uwe Stuehler, Vaibhav Bhatkar, Veronica Musso, Ying Chun “Daisy” Guo, Zhengguang Ou, and ZhiQiang Fan.

We want to be sure you read this book and log bugs and perhaps even fix some yourself if you’re so inclined! You can read how to on the OpenStack wiki. We also have the OpenStack Security Guide, written in a five day book sprint in June 2013. And we won’t stop there! Plans are underway for a third book to be written with a five day book sprint to help people design OpenStack clouds for many use cases.

We’ll continue to update these books using our community tool chain. We greatly appreciate the support from the OpenStack Foundation and O’Reilly to give the OpenStack Operations Guide that professional polish it deserves.

OpenStack 2014 T-Shirt Design Winner

The 2014 T-shirt design contest is a wrap! Thank you to everyone who shared their creativity and original designs with us this year.
We are excited to reveal our winner, Jaewin Ong of Singapore! This colorful design will debut on T-Shirts at PyCon in Montreal this week, and will be distributed at upcoming events worldwide.
OpenStack T-Shirt Design
We wanted to learn more about the creative mind behind the design, so we asked Jaewin a few questions:
What was your inspiration for this design?
  • The inspiration was actually the OpenStack logo! Since the logo is already of significance, I thought it would be cool to manipulate it with bright colors and superimposing the outline with itself.
 How long have you been designing?
  • My first design was for a T-Shirt, incidentally, during my freshman year in university. The T-Shirts were printed and sold to raise funds for a committee I was involved in. And I started out with MS Paint! I’ve come a long way.
 Where are you currently working?
  • I’m currently a junior in university pursuing a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
 In what way are you involved in OpenStack?
  • I’m afraid to say that my involvement with OpenStack is minimal. Although, I had some experience with Python during my internship. Otherwise, I do find cloud computing to be rather complex and I admire people who do it.
 Do you publish any of your other work online?
  • I don’t publish my work because I’m doing this out of interest. I would be grateful when it comes to a point where I’m publishing my work for other purposes besides interest.
 Is there anything else you might like to share about yourself?
  • I constantly look for opportunities like this to improve myself. It might not be a big deal to some, but it’s a big deal to me!
Congratulations, Jaewin!
Want to see your design on a future OpenStack T-Shirt? Stay tuned on our blog as we announce upcoming design contests!

 

OpenStack Day Events April – May – June 2014

Several upcoming OpenStack Day events are taking place around the world. Please join us in spreading the word and register soon. We hope to see you there!
OpenStack Day Mexico in Mexico City – April 29
  • When: Tuesday, April 29, 2014
  • Where: World Trade Center Mexico
  • Tickets: Tickets are MXN $200.00, covering all meals, workshops and conferences. Register quickly! 
OpenStack CEE Day in Budapest – May 26
OpenStack in Action 5! in Paris – May 28
  • Attendees will be provided with the raw materials to engage with the community, become a consumer of the technology and take part in its evolution
  • When: Wednesday, May 28, 2014
  • Where: CAP 15
  • Admission is free, so register to get an overview of the OpenStack technology, projects updates, challenges, best practices and roadmap for all audiences
#1 OpenStack Day in Milan – May 30
  • When: Friday, May 30, 2014
  • Where: Via Privata Stefanardo de Vimercate
OpenStack Israel in Tel Aviv-Yafo - June 2
Hear about OpenStack’s Icehouse Release from industry thought leaders and local OpenStack users. Following the conference, attend a 3-day training course on the current OpenStack Havana Release
  • When: Monday, June 2, 2014
  • Where: Arts Hall HaBama Herzliya
  • Tickets: We’re expecting +300 OpenStack users, prospective users, ecosystem members and developers to attend, so register quickly!
With an anticipated 500+ attendees from all sectors of London’s wide and diverse tech community, an exciting line-up of speakers and exhibitors, this will be the UK’s largest OpenStack related event this year!
  • When: Wednesday, June 4, 2014
  • Where: 155 Bishopsgate
  • Tickets: The early bird rate expires on May 14th, so register quickly before prices increase!
If you are interested in organizing an OpenStack Day event in your area, please contact events@openstack.org.

 

OpenStack Summit – now with more Ops

I’m excited about what the upcoming Atlanta OpenStack Summit is going to bring, especially for those of us running clouds.

Once again, we’ve got an Operations track in the main conference. It’s bigger than ever, running Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday — and, the sessions were selected by individuals with some serious ops credentials (as opposed to say, our vendor friends).  “Training your cluster to take care of itself and let you eat dinner in peace“, “because AD != LDAP“, and “Cinder on Ceph War Stories” are some of the sessions I’m looking forward to.

Throughout the week, there’s also specific presentations on Security, Compute, Networking and Storage, but today we’re excited to highlight a brand new section: the Ops Meetup.

People who run clouds need to have a place to congregate at the Summit and swap best practices, architectures, ideas and give feedback – this is the Ops Meetup. Essentially, all of the sessions are designed to be full-room discussions: there will be no presenters and salient notes will be collaboratively recorded on Etherpads, just like in the Design Summit.

So, if you’re running a cloud and you want to actively engage in serious and not-so-serious discussion with like-minded folks, register for the summit, then turn up Monday and Friday to room B308 in Atlanta! You might even make OpenStack better in the process.

You can find the current schedule below. Further details can be found on the planning etherpad, and you are welcome to participation in the discussion on the openstack-operators mailing list.

Until then, may your MTUs match, expired tokens be few, and your message queues be clean. See you at the Summit!

Monday
1115 – 1155   Ask the devs: Meet the PTLs and TC, How to get the best out of the design summit
1205 – 1245  Reasonable Defaults

1400 – 1440  Upgrades and Deployment Approaches
1450 – 1530  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails
1540 – 1620  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails

1640 – 1720 Networking

1730 – 1810  Security

Friday
9:00 – 9:40   Enterprise Gaps
9:50 – 10:30  Database

10:50 – 11:30 Issues at Scale
11:40 – 12:20 Meta Discussion – ops communication and governance

1:20 – 2:00 Ansible
2:10 – 2:50 Chef
3:00 – 3:40 Puppet

4:00 – 4:40 Monitoring and Logging

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