Tag: community


OpenStack Governance Elections Spring 2012

February 13th, 2012 — 1:00am

The time is once again upon us for our OpenStack Governance Elections. The OpenStack community is called to elect the Project Technical Leads and two seats of the Project Policy Board. The election committee is made of Stefano Maffulli, Lloyd Dewolf and Dave Nielsen.

  • February 16 – 26 11:59 PST: Nominations open.
  • February 28 – March 3 11:59 PST: Online voting open.
  • March 3 11:59 PST: Voting closed.

Final results will be posted immediately upon election close.

What seats are up for election

  • NOVA Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • SWIFT Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • GLANCE Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • HORIZON Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • KEYSTONE Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • Project Policy Board (2 Open Positions)

How to nominate yourself or others as Project Technical Lead

Only OpenStack community members who have code in the respective OpenStack subproject are eligible to be elected as that subproject’s Project Team Lead. Please nominate someone from the developer community or yourself at http://etherpad.openstack.org/Spring2012-Nominees under the Nominees heading.  Please provide the name and email address of the nominee. The election committee will then confirm with the nominee that they are willing to run for the position.The list of Approved Candidates will be announced with a new blog post on openstack.org/blog when online voting opens (Feb 28).

How to nominate yourself or others as member of the Project Policy Board

Any registered member of the OpenStack Launchpad group is eligible to run or be nominated for a position on the Project Policy Board. If you want to vote and/or run for a seat you need to register on Launchpad and add yourself to the public OpenStack group on https://launchpad.net/~openstack. Please nominate someone from the community or yourself at http://etherpad.openstack.org/Spring2012-Nominees under the Nominees heading. Please give the name and email address of the nominee. The election committee will then confirm with the nominee that they are willing to run for the position. The list of Approved Candidates will be announced with a new blog post on openstack.org/blog right before the election starts.

How to register to vote for PTL

Only OpenStack community members who have code in the respective OpenStack subproject are eligible to vote for that subproject’s Project Team Lead.  The authoritative list of eligible voters and nominees is the Authors file in each repository. For example, the list of Nova authors is https://github.com/openstack/nova/blob/master/Authors.
Make sure your name and correct email address is there or you won’t be able to vote.

How to register to vote for Project Policy Board

Any registered member of the OpenStack Launchpad group is eligible to vote for the Project Policy Board. If you want to vote you need to register to Launchpad and add yourself to the public OpenStack group on https://launchpad.net/~openstack before registering as a voter using the form at http://ppbelectionsregistration.openstack.org/. Company affiliation is only collected as an interesting statistic; it has no effect on the outcome of the election.

Voting process

Like previous OpenStack Governance Elections, we will use the Condorcet Internet Voting Service from Cornell University, http://www.cs.cornell.edu/andru/civs.html. This tool uses the Condorcet method of voting which invokes ranking the nominees instead of just selecting one choice. More information on this methodology is at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/w8/~andru/civs/rp.html.

All registered voters will receive an email with a unique link allowing them to privately vote.

Please note that the voting system is run using private polls with restricted access to ensure voter authenticity; however all results will be made public once the election ends. Voter anonymity is guaranteed. The result’s ranking will be evaluated using Schulze (also known as Beatpath or CSSD) completion rule.

Thanks for participating in this essential process. Please remind your friends and colleagues to get involved, register and vote!

Comment » | Communication, community, Governance

OpenStack Talk hosted by the Computer Society of India Pune Chapter

February 7th, 2012 — 9:49am

This is a guest post from Devdatta Kulkarni. Thanks Dev for sharing!

The Computer Society of India (CSI) Pune chapter organized an OpenStack talk with me, Racker Devdatta Kulkarni, on Saturday January 21, 2012 from 5.00 pm – 6.30 pm.

Sunset in Pune by flickr:yogendra174Approximately 35 people attended. The audience primarily consisted of people with a technical background. Technology professionals were the most represented category followed by college students, followed by researchers.

I divided my talk into two parts. In the first part, I touched upon the need for OpenStack, the project’s history and mission, and the current projects. In the second part I delved deeper into design and architectures of Nova, Swift, Glance, and Keystone, and concluded with information about how to participate in the community.

At the end of the talk I did a quick show of hands to find out how many attendees knew about OpenStack prior to the talk. Given that I saw only three hands in response, I think the talk certainly helped in raising the awareness of OpenStack within the technical community in Pune.

Here are some of the questions that came up at the talk. Anne Gentle wrote the answers for the questions and I want to share with the attendees as well as OpenStack blog readers.
Question 1) Performance benchmarks of OpenStack deployments. They have experimented with deployment of about 200 VMs and were seeing average VM creation time of about 20 minutes. They wanted to know if this was something expected. Also, they were wondering if there are any OpenStack performance benchmark results that can be shared with the community.
Anne: A 20 minute wait sounds like a long time to me for a single VM but a short time for 200 Vms. We haven’t found a good way to share performance benchmarks yet but a post to the mailing list would probably elicit responses. I’ve also seen John Dickinson talk to folks on IRC about their Object Storage benchmarks.

Question 2) Guidelines on topology. They wanted to know if there are any published guidelines regarding the optimal topology, such as number of glance servers, number of compute, volume, and network nodes in Nova deployments?
Anne: I’d recommend they take a look at http://referencearchitecture.org for both physical and logical architecture diagrams that show the number of servers and how to scale out a deployment.

Question 3) Active Directory support in Keystone. Is this being discussed within the Keystone working group?
Anne: It’s often discussed but no one has stepped up to write an AD plugin for Keystone yet that I know of.

Question 4) Is there a QEMU-based development environment for OpenStack?
Anne: Try out http://devstack.org and if you run it in a VM, it’ll use QEMU.

Question 5) Can you give pointers to learning material?
Anne: Each of the projects has a development docs site (nova.openstack.org, glance.openstack.org, swift.openstack.org, and so on). You’ll find API and admin docs at docs.openstack.org.

Comment » | community, Event, Meetup

Presenting OpenStack Foundation mission and roadmap [webinar]

January 10th, 2012 — 12:39pm

Jonathan Bryce and Mark Collier will host two webinars to illustrate the draft mission for the future OpenStack Foundation. The draft was published on http://wiki.openstack.org/Governance/Foundation/ and it’s the fist building block of the organisation that was announced in Boston. They will be available to answer questions about the roadmap and deadlines proposed for the project.  We believe a live conversation will complement the online discussion on the foundation mailing list. We picked the times of the webinars to accommodate the needs of people living across the world and we picked the technology that is most accessible. You can use your favourite operating system or dial in using toll free numbers for virtually anywhere in the world. If you encounter problems please let us know.

The first webinar will be held on Thursday Jan 12, 2012 at 06:00 PM CST (register here https://cc.readytalk.com/r/ogxx717wjy06) and the following day on Friday, Jan 13, 2012 at 9:00 AM CST (register here https://cc.readytalk.com/r/9o9bdh6hb3vn).

You may find the converter useful http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html to find your local time.

2 comments » | community, Governance, Webinar

More details about seminar “Open and safe in the cloud” in Ljubljana, Slovenia

December 20th, 2011 — 4:01pm

On December 14th company CHS d.o.o. hosted seminar on Open and Secure Cloud Computing, which was held in Tehnološki park in Ljubljana. This unique occasion assembled 49 attendants from academic and government representatives to small businesses and additional 17 students. Participants were eager to get to know leading IT trends in building own cloud environments with emphasis on open-source IaaS solution OpenStack. Crowd of participants started to gather from 9.30. a.m. and we began shortly after.

We were very honored to host our distinguished guest and OpenStack Community Manager, Stefano Maffulli, who gave an opening lecture about OpenStack. The lecture was a great hit and excited participents gave mister Maffulli numerous questions on the topic. Next up was Robert Dukarić, a member of first Slovenian Center for Cloud Computing, who presented Open Source IaaS solutions and gave a practical demonstration of OpenStack framework. Andrej Pančur, member of Laboratory for Computer Communications at the Ljubljana Faculty of Computer and Information Science talked in depth about security in the cloud and about new paradigm called “Security as a Service”, following Primož Cigoj, representative of Laboratory for Open Systems and Networks (E5) at Institut “Jožef Štefan“, who gave an overview of security in OpenStack.

After the first part of the seminar we had a break and the opportunity for participants to continue conversation regarding OpenStack experience aroused by itself. The vivid and pleasant talk was done while enjoying coffee and delicious croissants and after the short break the seminar continued.

Dalibor Baškovč was next, talking about KC Class and eurocloud.si. Ivan Tomašič and Aleksandra Rashkovska, colleges from the Institute Jožef Štefan, from department of Communication Systems, gave an insight of storing data in OpenStack. Next was once again Andrej Pančur, who talked together with his college Andrej Krevl about affordable and available tools for building high-performance data storage systems, based on ZFS and Nexenta solutions. Last up was Aleš Justin of RedHat, who gave his experience with developing clouds with application server Jboss.

Event came to an end but there was one more surprise for the participants who seemed to have really great time talking with lecturers at the end of seminar. In the spirit of upcoming holidays we offered warm buffet for everyone and the unofficial part of the seminar continued by the delicious wine. Experiences were shared and we concluded the event with the promise of future meetings to come, where gained knowledge from the seminar will be continued.

Comment » | Communication, community, Event

Results Of Survey After OpenStack Design Summit And Conference

December 14th, 2011 — 7:35am

In preparation for the next OpenStack Design Summit and Conference, I gave a look at the survey results of past edition. The events are a considerable investment for our team that is widely paid off by the good reviews we received from all participants. Looking into the answers it’s quite clear that the format and length were good and we should try to stick to it. We agreed that the attendance on Friday afternoon was not optimal and we’re thinking of ways to improve this aspect.  I’m very happy to see that participants to the Design Summit felt welcomed, included and encouraged to speak all the time (see table below).

Speaking of areas of improvement,  a key criteria for selecting the next venue will be high quality access to Internet or we’ll bring our own equipment (like Canonical does for the Ubuntu Design Summit). We’re also looking for more choice regarding hotel rates.

Both the unconference and lightning talks should be advertised better in order to improve attendance. Probably it’s because both were hard to find, being on a different floor. We should probably discuss how to improve them once we have fixed the venue.

On the Conference side we see a request to increase the presentation of case studies and have more sessions and choices (see table below). We’ll see how to balance this while keeping the format of the event.

Overall the responses were extremely positive and we’re very proud of what we’ve achieved so far. For the next Summit and Conference, we’re targeting the week of April 16 in New Orleans. We will post more information as soon as it is confirmed: keep watching this space for announcements.

14. Please rate how you felt the Design Summit sessions were managed:
Not at all Rarely Sometimes All the time N/A Rating
Average
Response
Count
Did you feel welcomed, included, and encouraged to speak for yourself? 0.0% (0) 2.3% (1) 22.7% (10) 72.7% (32) 2.3% (1) 3.72 44
Were the sessions well-moderated, focused and productive? 4.5% (2) 4.5% (2) 56.8% (25) 34.1% (15) 0.0% (0) 3.20 44
Did session leaders go out of their way to solicit your personal feedback? 4.5% (2) 9.1% (4) 65.9% (29) 18.2% (8) 2.3% (1) 3.00 44

 

15. How would you rate the sessions during the Conference (1-4):
poor (1) fair (2) good (3) great (4) N/A Rating
Average
Response
Count
Morning keynotes 0.0% (0) 8.9% (5) 50.0% (28) 32.1% (18) 8.9% (5) 3.25 56
Technical sessions 1.8% (1) 7.1% (4) 44.6% (25) 41.1% (23) 5.4% (3) 3.32 56
Panel sessions 1.8% (1) 21.4% (12) 46.4% (26) 21.4% (12) 8.9% (5) 2.96 56
User stories 0.0% (0) 8.9% (5) 44.6% (25) 35.7% (20) 10.7% (6) 3.30 56

Read the full results of the survey.

Comment » | community

Community Weekly Review (Nov 11-18)

November 18th, 2011 — 12:58pm

OpenStack Community Newsletter – November 11, 2011

HIGHLIGHTS

EVENTS

GENERAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY STATISTICS

  • A new format for the community statistics: the gallery below shows the activity on some of the OpenStack repositories, lines of code added and removed by the developers during the past week. Let us know what else you would like to see on a weekly basis.
This weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Comment » | community, Newsletter

Community Weekly Review (Nov 4-11)

November 11th, 2011 — 5:34pm

OpenStack Community Newsletter – November 11, 2011

HIGHLIGHTS

  • New weekly graphs of commit activities on OpenStack main repositories
  • The OpenStack wiki now accepts Launchpad ID for login (thank you, Chmouel)
  • OpenStack packaging coordination effort hangs out on irc.freenode.net #openstack-packaging
  • The OpenStack devroom was accepted at FOSDEM 2012: shine your passport, meet developers in Bruxelles, Feb 4-5

EVENTS

DEVELOPER COMMUNITY

GENERAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY STATISTICS

  • A new format for the community statistics: the gallery below shows the activity on some of the OpenStack repositories, lines of code added and removed by the developers during the past week. Let us know what else you would like to see on a weekly basis.

 

This weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Comment » | community, Newsletter

Community Weekly Review (Oct 28-Nov 4)

November 4th, 2011 — 4:04pm

OpenStack Community Newsletter – November 4, 2011

HIGHLIGHTS

EVENTS

DEVELOPER COMMUNITY

GENERAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY STATISTICS

This weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Comment » | community, Newsletter

A team for the OpenStack International Community

October 27th, 2011 — 11:10am

With so many people interested in OpenStack that new user groups start regularly. A list on the community page mentions groups in Egypt, Japan, China, and more but we know it’s partial. There are more OpenStack groups and more people are interested in forming one. We’ve established a new OpenStack team, the International Community team on Launchpad with the objective: To help user groups around the world to advertise their existence, to share best practices, announce local events and coordinate activities. And have fun meanwhile.

If you run an OpenStack user group, a meetup, want to host an hackaton join the OpenStack International Community team and subscribe to the mailing list.

Comment » | Communication, community

Happy Ada Lovelace Day

October 7th, 2011 — 7:25am

Ada Lovelace day, October 7th, is a day for bloggers to write a story about an inspirational influence in their life in technology.

For me, there were two influential woman in my life as an undergraduate chemistry student in the early 90s at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana. One was my first college chemistry professor, Anne McCowan, and the other was Butler’s scientific librarian, Mrs. Howes. Both influenced me through words, and bringing the importance of words to my attention. Professor McCowan stated on the first day of class:

“Chemistry is a study of nomenclature. Once you understand the naming and vocabulary, the world of chemistry is opened to you.”

It was such a simplification of an intimidating subject that it crystallized the learning process for me. If I studied the vocabulary, the rest would follow. And here I am, combining the wonder of worlds and technology every day.

So on today, Ada Lovelace day, I want to ask, how can OpenStack be a welcoming community for women in technology? I have ideas and want to share them with the community. These are both small ideas and large ideas.

  • Inspire girls when they’re young. I have volunteered with an organization called GirlStart here in Austin, Texas, and I think they’ve got the right idea, influence girls to enter technology in middle school and elementary and encourage them to go to college. A few years ago I went to lunch once a month with middle school girls where we talked about simple ideas such as “what does it mean to be smart?” That group of girls will be in high school now, and I hope they find technology a good path for them.
  • Invite women specifically. I spoke with Noirin Plunkett at OSCon this summer, and she said that women don’t necessarily have the confidence (or is it ego) to understand they are being specifically invited to participate in a tech initiative or open source project. You can specifically say to a group of female collage students for example, by saying “our project needs you specifically, not just your male colleagues.”
  • Start in your neighborhood, at your company. Since Rackspace is a huge supporter and founder of OpenStack, we want to ensure that we bring our women to the project and make them feel like Stackers are their kind of people. Stackers are professional, mature, and respectful of each other. We certainly have heated discussions but all input is valuable. I want to start locally by inviting women to Austin Cloud User Group meetings, by recruiting women for Rackspace jobs, and putting myself out there constantly, which is not always comfortable but it is rewarding.

How about your perspective here? Where will you start and when? Let’s take these first steps towards inviting more women to join our open source cloud computing efforts.

1 comment » | Communication, community, Development, Documentation

Back to top