OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Mar 13 – 20)

Feature freeze + Kilo-3 development milestone available

We just hit Feature Freeze, so please do not approve changes that add features or new configuration options unless those have been granted a feature freeze exception. This is also String Freeze, so you should avoid changing translatable strings. If you have to modify a translatable string, you should give a heads-up to the I18N team. Finally, this is also DepFreeze so you should avoid adding new dependencies (bumping oslo or openstack client libraries is OK until RC1). If you have a new dependency to add, raise a thread on openstack-dev about it.

The kilo-3 development milestone was tagged, it contains more than 200 features and 825 bugfixes added since the kilo-2 milestone 6 weeks ago. More details on the full announcement.

The joy of contributing to OpenStack

Contributing to OpenStack doesn’t have to be painful. To ease these pain points, OpenStack developed free upstream training.. You can sign up for the next one by May 2.

Another nice reading on the topic is Why your first OpenStack commit will always be the hardest, the interview with Susanne Balle, distinguished technologist with HP Cloud working on platform services.

Leveraging OpenStackClient as your unified command line interface

OpenStackClient v1.0.3 was released last week and this release includes a large number of feature requests and bug fixes. But the even more exciting news is that the OpenStack Technical Committee voted in favor to include OpenStackClient as part of it’s list of official projects! The newly integrated OpenStackClient project will include python-openstackclient, cliff and os-client-config.

Handling High Email Volume with sup

Over the last year, the openstack-dev mailing list has averaged 2500 messages every month. Staying on top of that much email can be challenging, especially with some of the consumer-grade email clients available today. Doug Hellmann recently upgraded his email setup to use sup, a terminal-based mail client. He says the switch helped him process the mailing list, and even keep up with gerrit at the same time. Sounds too good to be true to me. What do you think?

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

  • None

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

OpenStack @ PyCon 2015: Booth info, looking for volunteers, posting of jobs, OpenStack presentations

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

Weird ping pong shot shocks opponent

And ready to commit… oh, when was Feature Freeze again?

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

 

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Mar 6 – 13)

Five years in: Charting the OpenStack galaxy

The Starship Enterprise had a five year mission, to “explore strange new worlds,” among other things, and as we approach the five year mark in our own mission, it’s fun to think about the worlds we’ve seen and contemplate where to go next. Did anyone think we’d have a non-profit foundation in year three, with VMware joining right after we started it? Strange new worlds, indeed.

Check out what’s under the hood at TryStack

Billed as the easiest way to try out OpenStack, this free service lets you test what the cloud can do for you, offering networking, storage, and compute instances, without having to go all in with your own hardware. Dan Radez, whose day job is at Red Hat, unveiled TryStack’s new gear in a lightning show-and-tell talk at the recent Mid-Cycle Ops Meetup.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

Reports from Previous Events

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

OpenStack @ PyCon 2015: Booth info, looking for volunteers, posting of jobs, OpenStack presentations

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

http://lh3.ggpht.com/-6xFloLYcJD8/TpN0_8eMnEI/AAAAAAAABcg/t7VTmbfYEUQ/nickshock_thumb.gif

After taking one day off the mailing list …

 

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

 

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 27 – Mar 6)

OpenStack User Groups get a new home

It’s easy to stay in touch with OpenStack birds-of-a-feather wherever you are, from India to Italy, with the new OpenStack User Groups portal. Even with events all over the globe, it’s super simple to stay current — join a group, and you’ll be notified of new events when they’re created.

The facets of the OpenStack integrated release

Thierry Carrez looks into the various meanings the “integrated release” ended up having in our history, and see how we can better convey that information through separate tags.

DefCore Process 9 Point Graphic balances Community, Vendor, Goverance

Rob Hirschfeld has been working on the OpenStack DefCore process for nearly 3 years and he recognizes that the number #1 challenge of the effort remains how to explain it simply. The DefCore team has nevertheless managed to boil it down into nine key points.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

killingbug

Killing all bugs before a new release

 

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 20 – 27)

OpenStack DefCore Accelerates & Simplifies with Clear and Timely Guidelines [Feedback?]

Last week, the OpenStack DefCore committee rolled up our collective sleeves and got to work in a serious way. We had a in-person meeting with great turn out with 5 board members, Foundation executives/staff and good community engagement. TL;DR > We think DefCore deliverables should be dated milestone guidelines instead tightly coupled to release events (see graphic on Rob Hirschfeld‘s blog).

Scaling OpenStack Neutron Development

During Kilo cycle, Neutron’s team has made an effort to expand and scale the Neutron development community. Plugin Decomposition and Advanced Services Split were designed to enable a more scalable development environment which will allow for fast code iteration in all the areas affected. How have we done with these?

OpenStack + Kubernetes = More choice and flexibility for developers

Sometimes a demo can go almost too well. By the time Craig Peters and Georgy Okrokvertskhov took the mic to show how OpenStack support for Kubernetes makes managing Docker containers pretty much a point-and-click operation, the crowd at the Kubernetes San Francisco meetup was almost hoping for a glitch. Instead, in just under 10 minutes, the pair did a seamless walk-through of how to set up a Kubernetes cluster using OpenStack in the final demo of the night.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports From Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

callingthebatman

Pinging a core reviewer for a quick review to fix the gate

 

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

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Sign up for OpenStack Upstream Training in Vancouver

It’s becoming a habit: the OpenStack Foundation will repeat in Vancouver the Upstream Training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack contributors are successful at integrating their contributions into OpenStack.  If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Vancouver, May 16-17. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit. We’ve done it before the Summits in Atlanta and Paris and participants loved it.

With over 2000 developers from 80 different companies worldwide, OpenStack is one of the largest collaborative software-development projects. Because of its size, it is characterized by a huge diversity in social norms and technical conventions. These can significantly slow down the speed at which changes by newcomers are integrated in the OpenStack project.

OpenStack Foundation is training new OpenStack developers and documentation writers to ensure bug fixes or features are accepted in the OpenStack project in a minimum amount of time and as little struggle as possible. Students are required to work on real-life bug fixes or new features during two days of real-life classes and online mentoring, until the work is accepted by OpenStack.

The live two-day class teaches developers to navigate the intricacies of the project’s technical tools and social interactions. In followup sessions, the students benefit from individual online sessions to help them resolve any remaining problems they might have. Get all the details on the wiki.

Enrolment for the training session in Vancouver is open: register and reserve your seat for OpenStack Upstream Training in Vancouver, May 16-17.

Tags:

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 13 – 20)

OpenStack Technical Committee Update: Project Reform Progress

Over the last few months, the Technical Committee has been discussing plans to dissolve the binary concept of the integrated release and adapt our projects structure to the future needs of collaborative development in the OpenStack community. A specification was written to describe the rationale for the reform and its goals. In the past weeks, the OpenStack Technical Committee approved a first set of changes, affecting how OpenStack upstream teams and projects developed by our community are organized.

Contributing to open cloud projects without losing your mind

If you’re interested in contributing to OPNFV, OpenDaylight or OpenStack, there are a few things to keep in mind to make the process easier.

Welcome to the wild west of networking and cloud infrastructure

It may look like the wild west now, but the future of open networking and cloud infrastructure is bright. That’s the main takeaway from a panel featuring speakers from Red Hat, Ericsson, Cumulus Networks and the OpenStack Foundation moderated by Neela Jacques at the Linux Collaboration Summit.

Nice APIs: Limits in OpenStack SDK

Brian Curtin has been working with a team on the OpenStack SDK, a project aimed at providing a great experience for Python developers who use OpenStack. He and his colleagues want to enable people to build great things on top of OpenStack and are looking for feedback.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports From Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

  • None

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

The effect to the gate when introducing a bad commit in a client release

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Technical Committee Update: Project Reform Progress

Over the last few months, the Technical Committee has been discussing plans to dissolve the binary concept of the integrated release and adapt our projects structure to the future needs of collaborative development in the OpenStack community. A specification was written to describe the rationale for the reform and its goals. In the past weeks, the OpenStack Technical Committee approved a first set of changes, affecting how OpenStack upstream teams and projects developed by our community are organized.

Project teams

The first of those changes is the transition from “programs” to “project teams”. We previously organized the work in OpenStack around thematic programs, like “Compute”, “Infrastructure”, or “Deployment”. This created several issues, including terminology collision with “trademark programs”, or naming confusion (“Compute” was used both as the official name for Nova and the name of the development team that was producing it). But the most important issue was that it was exclusive: there could only be one “deployment” program. No alternative solution could grow and prove itself without being somehow adopted by the incumbent team. That was stifling innovation and keeping valuable projects, arguably developed within the OpenStack community, forever out of “OpenStack”.

By calling them project teams instead, and naming them after the code name of their main product (“the Nova team”, “the TripleO team”), we avoid that exclusion. We also get real and call teams the way everyone calls them upstream. That doesn’t mean we’ll have alternative project teams to every existing project team: obviously competition doesn’t make sense for teams like the Infrastructure team, where there can only be one used anyway.  But allowing some competition to happen lets us foster innovation where it bring value to our users.

New requirements for project teams

The second change is in the requirements for new work groups to be officially accepted as an OpenStack project team. New programs used to have complex and very subjective requirements, including avoiding overlap in scope with existing programs. For programs working on a software deliverable, we would assess the maturity of the deliverables and judge their potential fit with the rest of the “integrated release”. That created a number of issues (detailed in the spec for those interested), ultimately resulting in our complete inability to accept new groups during the Juno cycle.

The new requirements are more social than technical. The goal is to determine if a project team is “one of us”: do they help fulfill the OpenStack mission ? Do they follow the OpenStack Way (the four opens) ? Do they run their daily development as the other OpenStack projects ? Do they follow our development cycles ? Do they use the openstack-dev mailing-list and participate to our Design Summits ? Then they are obviously a part of the OpenStack community and the software they produce should be recognized as “an OpenStack project”.

We will accept new project teams applications starting now, although the Technical Committee expects to process them serially and slowly at first, since we are still fine-tuning the requirements and the application process. We still expect a number of new project teams to be added before the Liberty Design Summit in Vancouver.

Some people are worried about the sudden influx of new project teams disrupting the Design Summit. My answer to this is that we actually already had more than just official programs at the Design Summit, we already gave time and space to projects that were obviously a part of our community. This is just making things clearer. Together with proposed changes on the Design Summit format, we are confident that the event can survive this change.

No more incubation ladder to the integrated release

The third change is that we started to deconstruct the “integrated release” concept into a set of more clearly-defined tags. As explained in the spec, the binary “integrated release” attribute ended up meaning different things to different people. It was originally just meaning “released together on the same date”. But since that was the only attribute around, people inferred stability, maturity or being a necessary block where there was just adoption of common development processes. That created a lot of confusion and also made it a very desirable badge rather than a technical attribute, resulting in an always-larger mix of projects, projects that were not consumed in the same way by our users. Time had come for that single and binary concept to die and be replaced by a series of more precisely-defined attributes that will ultimately provide a richer description of the projects in our ecosystem.

We created the framework for defining such tags. As a first step and to ensure a seamless transition, we created an “integrated-release” tag to describe the list of projects that will be released together at the end of the Kilo cycle. And in the coming months, we’ll start defining tags for the various facets of the “integrated release” concept and apply them to the projects that match their requirements. Those tags will help users make more informed decisions.

Since that will ultimately make the integrated release an obsolete concept, we also got rid of the “incubation” period. Incubation was the period during which projects were learning processes and lining up a series of requirements before we would feel confident they would be able to release at the same date as other “integrated projects” without jeopardizing the existing ones. Since we are getting rid of “integrated release” as a single objective, we are also getting rid of the incubation ladder that was slowly leading to it. The work to define rigorous standards of quality goes on, however, through the definition of specific QA-related tags and more direct mentoring of project teams.

What does that mean for existing incubated projects ? Well, they remain full-fledged OpenStack projects, produced by official OpenStack project teams. They will get tags applied to them (or not) as we define and introduce them.

What about core ?

OpenStack “core” is a set of rules, defined by the OpenStack Foundation board of directors (more precisely, its Defcore subcommittee), associated with specific trademark programs (think: what you need to implement in order to brand your solution asOpenStack Powered“). Defcore used to build their “core” rules out of the “Integrated release” list of projects, so how is it affected by those changes ?

First, Defcore already moved away from a simple list of core projects to an approach based on capabilities and required sections of code, which may then apply to multiple different trademark programs. The recently-adopted new bylaws wording still requires Defcore to pick required sections of code from a Technical Committee approved list of projects, so the Technical Committee still expects to have to provide lists of projects for Defcore to pick from. We’ll likely express our answers as specific tags, so that it’s disconnected from other attributes and can have specific deprecation rules that are aligned with the trademark programs specific needs.

What about focus ?

With the likely increase in the number of OpenStack project teams and delivered software, there is a natural fear that this will dilute attention away from the essential projects. We don’t expect that to be the case. First, this is not a zero-sum game: recognizing more project teams as being a part of our community will bring new blood inside our community, rather than keeping them artificially outside. Second, critical sets of projects will emerge as being the base sets the other projects all have to rely on. Those base sets will be much smaller than the current integrated release, so it will be easier for us to focus our efforts. The overloaded and ever-increasing “integrated release” forced us to increasingly dilute our focus, and this evolution will enable us to put greater focus on the foundational pieces.

What’s next ?

The next step in the reform is to start defining the tags that will replace the “integrated-release” single concept. For example, I plan to introduce a series of tags to describe the release model of each project. Are they coordinated by the release management team to ensure they release on time ? Are they just adopting the common release schedule and doing their best to hit the date ? Are they following their own feature-based schedule, trying to do a release to match the Kilo release date ? Or are they just releasing whenever they please ? Those tags will provide a much richer information to our downstream users than what we currently provide.

But that is just an example. The goal is for our community to step up and define the tags that will be useful to them, with documented criteria. The Technical Committee shouldn’t have the exclusivity in tag definition. I expect our operators, our distros, our end users to discuss the attributes that would be useful to them, and propose the corresponding tags. The Technical Committee shouldn’t have exclusivity in associating tags to projects either: tags should be applied by those who know best (and who applies them is actually part of each tag definition). The Technical Committee is just overseeing the tag framework — it’s up to us all to make it as useful as possible to navigate our ever-growing ecosystem.

 

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 6 – 13)

OpenStack crowns “Liberty” its next release name

OpenStack’s next release will be called Liberty. While you might be thinking of the word liberty in terms of “freedom” (as in free beer or other things), the name comes from a village in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.

Introducing PoshStack, the PowerShell client for OpenStack

OpenStack SDKs exist for several programming languages, including Python, Go, Ruby, and many more. For those who don’t wish to write code, users in the *nix world can use Curl at the command line to perform operations. What about Microsoft Windows administrators? Windows admins can use PowerShell and PoshStack”.

How you can help refresh OpenStack’s Documentation site

If you’ve checked out the OpenStack Documentation site recently, you may have noticed a new look. The refreshed design of the landing page is the beginning of an ongoing overhaul. The site is, however, open under construction and people are already applauding the refresh. The move to a simpler markup language will go a long way to helping OpenStack contributors work on the documentation that matters to them.

GSoC2015: Its time for potential mentors and participants!

It is time for us to apply for slots for the annual Google Summer of Code event. Last year, we got a bunch of slots and had awesome projects. We are hoping this year we will get even more slots, uber cool projects etc. If you are interested – either as a mentor or as a participant, please feel free to add your name, project ideas to the wiki page.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports From Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

  • None

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Supercomputing 2015 Call for Presentations Deadlines Coming Up

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

learnt

When I heard that there was some private OpenStack channels

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 30 – Feb 6)

OpenStack “L” naming poll

We’d like your help again in selecting the right name for the development cycle and release coming after “Kilo”. Our next summit will happen in Vancouver, BC (Canada) in May. L candidate names were proposed, selected and checked for various issues… leaving 4 candidates on the final public poll. Please take a moment to participate to our poll: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/openstack-l-naming

Take these OpenStack Infrastructure tools and run!

When you’ve got thousands of proposed patchsets, comments and test environments flooding in every day, you need the right tools to handle them. OpenStack created these free software tools to handle its burgeoning scale – here’s what they can do for you.

How to craft a successful OpenStack Summit proposal

The community has plenty to say: there were over 1,000 proposals for less than 200 talks at the Paris Summit in November 2014. For the upcoming Summit in Vancouver, there are 17 Summit tracks, from community building and security to hands-on labs. The deadline for proposals is February 9.

Musings and Predictions from Superuser’s Editorial Advisors

We spoke to Superuser’s editorial advisory board to hear their perspectives on the Kilo release and what they’re looking forward to as the Vancouver Summit approaches in May.

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports From Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

heat-autoscale

Heat autoscale

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 23 – 30)

Working to bridge the developer/end-user divide in OpenStack

The Product Working Group will embark on a listening campaign to improve dialogue between developers and their managers.

How to craft a successful OpenStack Summit proposal

Inspiration, tips and a kick in the pants for the Feb. 9 deadline.

An atomic upgrade process for OpenStack compute nodes

Steve Dake has been involved with the Kolla project, a project to containerize OpenStack as well as Magnum, a project to provide containers as a service. In his blog post he talks about containers, how they are are super useful as an upgrade tool for OpenStack.

Building a cloud career with OpenStack

What can OpenStack do for you? How about helping you along your career? OpenStack is a growing space and there are more than enough jobs still to go around for qualified seekers. So how do you go about getting one of those jobs?

The Road to Vancouver

Relevant Conversations

Deadlines and Development Priorities

Reports From Previous Events

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

The 2015 events plan is now available on the Global Events Calendar wiki.

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

OpenStack Reactions

investigating

Starting to look over migrating a large cloud from nova-network to neutron

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.