The OpenStack Blog

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (June 13 – 20)

Summer Speaking Sessions and Call for Papers

Summer is in full swing and there are some great industry events coming up on the OpenStack Marketing calendar, as well as Call for Proposals deadlines!

Marconi to AMQP: See you later

In the last couple of weeks, Marconi’s team has been doing lots of research around AMQP and the possibility of supporting traditional queuing systems. Flavio Percoco, believed with others that this capability would be useful. However, after digging more into what’s needed and what supporting traditional brokers means for Marconi, the community changed its mind and now believes supporting such systems doesn’t make much sense anymore. This post explains why.

Tracking multiple OpenStack projects using StoryBoard

StoryBoard is a new task tracking system which is aimed at the systems where projects are closely related, and OpenStack is definitely a good example of that. In inter-related systems like OpenStack, a feature or a bug usually affects more than one project, so it should be tracked simultaneously across those projects. The proof-of-concept was presented in the Havana release cycle by OpenStack release manager Thierry Carrez, and active development started during the Icehouse development cycle. The project is now driven by three major contributor companies: the OpenStack Foundation, Mirantis, and HP.

Breaking news:OpenStack Object Storage ‘Storage policies’ merge today

The series of patches that will eventually lead to Swift 2.0 merged today. Many Swift contributors have been working on storage policies for quite some time now. It’s a huge feature and improvement to Swift that enables a ton of new use cases. Storage policies allow deployers to configure multiple object rings and expose them to end users on a per-container basis. Deployers can create policies based on hardware performance, regions, or other criteria and independently choose different replication factors on them. A policy is set on a Swift container at container creation time and cannot be changed. Full docs and more details about the roadmap in this message by John Dickinson.

Security Advisories and Notices

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

peng fei wang Renjie Sun
Doug Wiegley Vishal kumar mahajan
Stephen Jahl Nikunj Aggarwal
joanne Lennart Regebro
Richard Hagarty João Cravo
Flavio Fernandes Anna Eilering
yingjun Vivek Jain
Tom Cammann Susanne Balle
Julie Gravel Stephen Balukoff
Rikimaru Honjo Shayne Burgess
Diana Whitten Nathan Manville
Max Grishkin
German Eichberger
Dustin Lundquist
Doug Wiegley
Yi Sun
Przemyslaw Czesnowicz
FrazyLee
Ying Zuo
Julie Gravel
Jorge Chai
Bradley Klein

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

its-friday

When I see the OpenStack newsletter in my mailbox

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Summer Speaking Sessions and Call for Papers

Summer is in full swing and there are some great industry events coming up on the calendar, as well as Call for Proposals deadlines!

The Global Events Calendar is the primary resource to know what events are approaching. It is fully editable, so you can update the following criteria:

  • If your organization is attending, sponsoring or exhibiting (COLUMN G)
  • Provide feedback or ideas on events (COLUMN H)
  • Add vendor-independent industry events to the calendar (complete ALL criteria)

Here are the upcoming industry events planned for July:

OSCON: July 20 – 24, Portland OR

  • No charge Expo Plus registration using OPENSTACKEHO.  Or 25% discount on any other conference pass using OPENSTACK25.  Pass these on!
  • Open Cloud Day: July 21, featuring Chris Launey from The Walt Disney Company, OpenStack user, Thierry Carrez from the OpenStack Foundation, and Rob Hirschfeld, OpenStack Board Director.  Open to all registrants, including Expo Plus.
  • If you’re attending, be sure to attend the OpenStack birthday party Tuesday, July 22nd at Union/Pine. Details coming soon!

EuroPython: July 21 – 27, Berlin, Germany
PyCon AU: August 1 – 5, Brisbane Australia – There will be an OpenStack miniconf on Friday, August 1, a full day event with several community speakers
CloudOpen NA: August 20 – 22, Chicago  - Looking for a well-known speaker and community volunteers

Here are the approaching CFP deadlines:

DEVIEW 2014: June 30
LinuxCon/CloudOpen Europe: July 11
Software Defined Enterprise World Forum: No deadline listed
FSOSS: No deadline listed

If you have any questions, or you would like to plan a regional OpenStack Day, please contact events@openstack.org

Category: community, Event, Uncategorized

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (June 6 – 13)

Moving forward as a User Experience Team in the OpenStack Juno release cycle

The OpenStack Juno Summit in Atlanta was a major turning point for User Experience professionals working on OpenStack. There were 3 specific design sessions around UX work and 1 talk on the persona work, all with great attendance, and the whole team committed taking a number of actions to take over the course of the Juno development cycle. Liz Blanchard summarized them quite nicely.

OpenStack Technical Committee Update

The OpenStack Technical Committee (TC) meets weekly and recently decided to publish regular updates about the TC to the OpenStack blog. The first post has news about the graduation process, Glance and Designate.

Calling on Security Engineers / Developers / Architects – Time to share your toys

Lets work together and openly on security review and threat analysis for OpenStack. There are currently scores of security reviews taking place on OpenStack architecture, projects and implementations. Robert Clark sent a call for action to OpenStack developers: “All the big players in OpenStack are conducting their own security reviews, we are all finding things that should be addressed in the community and that we are all missing things that others have found too.” Robert’s call is for all the security people out there in the community to come together and share expertise on Threat Modelling/Analysis in OpenStack.

Reports from Past Events

Tips ‘n Tricks

Security Notes and Advisories

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Petersingh Anburaj mark collier
Ellen Hui Rey Aram Alcantara
Pierre Rognant Patrick Crews
ajay Angela Smith
Rui Zang Zu Qiang
Rahul Verma Vladimir Eremin
Christoph Arnold Praveen Yalagandula
Amit Prakash Pandey
Ton Ngo
Tom Cammann
Sam Leong
Paul Montgomery
James Chapman
Gal Sagie

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

tumblr_inline_n1h25lbMTa1raprkq

Giving +2 out of fear

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

PTL Webinars: Icehouse to Juno

It is time again for our PTL post-Summit webinar series. Come listen to the latest project updates from Icehouse to Juno. Each webinar includes 45 minutes of updates with 15 minutes of q&a.

These webinars were established to reduce the number of conflicts during the Summit and allow for broader participation. Our goal is to host a few webinars like this a week through early July. Please join us or listen to the replays on the OpenStack Foundation’s YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/OpenStackFoundation.

Completed Webinars
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
Anne Gentle (Docs)
Dolph Mathews (Identity)
Mark Washenberger (Image Service)
View the Slides
Replay

Tuesday, June 24, 2014
7 a.m. PT/10 a.m. ET
Eoghan Glynn (Telemetry)
John Griffith (Block Storage)
View the Slides
Replay

12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
John Dickinson (Object Storage)
Robert Collins (Provisioning)
View the Slides
Replay

Thursday, June 26, 2014
7 a.m. PT/10 a.m. ET
Sergey Lukjanov (Data Processing)
Doug Hellmann (Common Libraries)
Thierry Carrez (Release Management)
View the Slides
Replay

12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
David Lyle (Dashboard)
Kyle Mestery (Networking)
View the Slides
Replay

4pm PT / 7pm ET
Michael Still (Compute)
View the Slides
Replay

Tuesday, 7/1/2014
12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
Nikhil Manchanda (Database as a Service)
Zane Bitter (Orchestration)
View the Slides
Replay

If you have any questions on these events, please contact margie@openstack.org or allison@openstack.org.

Category: Uncategorized

Open Mic Spotlight: Ryan Hsu

RyanHsuThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Ryan is a longtime resident of Orange County who recently moved to Silicon Valley to work on Openstack at VMware. He has been mainly focused on testing and infra in Openstack (such as the VMware Minesweeper) but has squeezed in some small contributions in Nova and Horizon as well. Follow him on Twitter @serveshrimp

1. Finish the sentences. OpenStack is great for _______. OpenStack is bad for ______.

Openstack is great for choice. Openstack is bad for nobody. The great thing about OpenStack is that people have total control in selecting the best of breed components to build their cloud. Nobody ever got a nosebleed for choosing Openstack.

2. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku! 

Submit awesome patch
Instantly get minus one
Shout curse at the screen

3. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

My first bout into coding was in the 6th grade when my friends and I would create horrible websites on Geocities. And when we got bored in math class, we would create tiny games in TI-BASIC on our calculators. It wasn’t until college, though, when I actually started coding useful things.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

Anywhere that has little noise and visual distraction, preferably with a dog nearby. Currently the best place is home.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

OpenStack is extremely dynamic unlike any other projects I’ve worked on in the past. The sheer number of people working on the project, diversity of contributors, and level of enthusiasm never ceases to amaze me. Also, Python!

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Technical Committee Update

The OpenStack Technical Committee (TC) meets weekly. During the meeting on 2014-06-03, one of the topics we discussed was the relatively low turnout for the TC election as compared to the PTL elections. The most productive thing to come out of that discussion was that we needed to do a better job of communicating what the TC is working on and why it is important. As a result, we will be posting regular updates about the TC to the OpenStack blog. This first post will likely be a bit longer as it’s important to set up some of the context for the things we are currently discussing.

How the TC was formed is described in the history of OpenStack open source project governance  by the current chair of the TC, Thierry Carrez.

Openness

Open governance is an important value held by OpenStack and the TC wants to be as open as possible. In addition to these regular updates, you can find the details of everything we do in a few other places. The archives of the openstack-tc mailing list are open. Our weekly IRC meetings are public and logged.

All project governance work is managed in a git repository and changes are reviewed in gerrit in the same way that we review code. Everyone that is interested is invited to comment on proposed governance changes. You can find a list of changes under review here. You can find a list of previously approved changes and the discussions that happened on their reviews here.

Project Incubation and Graduation Requirements

One of the responsibilities of the TC is to manage the set of projects that are included in the OpenStack integrated release. New projects may apply to be incubated. Incubated projects will later be reviewed for graduation from incubation. A graduated project is a part of the integrated release.

As OpenStack has grown, it became clear that we needed to be much more clear around our expectations of projects for incubation and graduation. Over the last year we worked to formalize these expectations in a document in the governance repository. We approved the first version of this document on December 2, 2013. We have been updating it ever since as more issues need to be clarified. You can find the latest version of that document in the Governance git repository.

Toward the end of the Icehouse development cycle, we started a process of going through all projects already in the integrated release and evaluating them against this criteria. For any project that has gaps against these expectations, we require that the PTL present a plan for addressing these gaps during the Juno cycle.

Glance

The latest project review was for Glance, during the TC meeting on 2014-06-10. The only gap found for Glance was around tempest test coverage. Specifically, Tempest does not cover uploading a real binary image to Glance. The Glance PTL will now come up with a plan to address this gap and the TC will review progress against this plan throughout the Juno cycle.

We actually spent quite a bit of this meeting talking about Glance. The most controversial topic is around the proposal to increase its scope. Glance is currently focused on disk images. There is a proposal against the governance repository to expand its scope to cover a more general definition of artifacts. The particular use cases that inspired this direction for Glance is the desire to store things like Heat or Murano templates. In the end, there seems to be broad support for the general direction proposed. We still have some work to do to get the wording of the mission statement in a form that everyone is comfortable with.

Finally, the Glance project brought an important cross-project API consistency question to the TC. Specifically, they have an alternative method for how they would like to expose actions through their API which is different from how Nova does it currently, for example. There was support for the specific proposal. However, it raises the larger question about how we go about best working toward cross project API consistency. We would love to have someone lead an effort to create a cross-project API style guide for OpenStack, but it’s unclear who will do it and exactly who would review and approve the content. I expect this to be an ongoing discussion.

You can find the full mailing list thread that spawned this API discussion in the archives starting in May and continuing in June.

Designate

Another project that has received a lot of attention recently is Designate, which provides DNS as a Service for OpenStack. This is a sorely needed feature for OpenStack deployments so I’m very happy to see the progress made in this area.

The project recently applied for incubation. This is actually the second time that Designate has applied for incubation. The first time was one year ago, in June of 2013. After the first application, the TC concluded that it was a bit too early to incubate the project. There were various concerns, but the primary one was the level of involvement in the project, in terms of individuals and separate companies.

Designate has matured a good bit over the last year and I’m proud to announce that the application has been approved. Designate is now an incubated project!

The earliest Designate will be included in the integrated release would be the K release. Given that we’re already well into the Juno cycle, the L release seems more realistic. This is a topic that the TC would revisit at the end of the Juno development cycle.

Future Updates

We want to make these updates from the TC as useful as possible. If you have any comments or suggestions, please let us know!

Category: Communication, community, Governance

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 30 – June 6)

An Ideal OpenStack Developer

In a long piece, Mark McLoughlin thinks about the velocity OpenStack achieved and how it has managed to attract an unusual number of contributors and, for such a complex project, made it relatively easy for tThe way I feel when upgrading my OpenStack cloudhem to contribute. He attempts to define The Prototypical OpenStack Developer. The ideal that we should aspire to. The standard that all contributors should be held to. And asks questions at the end.

Analysis of April 2014 TC election

Thierry Carrez found time to analyze the results of the recent 2014 election to renew 7 of the 13 Technical Commitee’s members. It seems we have ‘currents’ among voters, from the foodie party to the French one.

Understanding OpenStack Designated Code Sections – Three critical questions

After nearly a year of discussion, the OpenStack board launched the DefCore process with 10 principles that set us on path towards a validated interoperability standard.   We created the concept of “designated sections” to address concerns that using API tests to determine core would undermine commercial and community investment in a working, shared upstream implementation. Designated sections provide the “you must include this” part of the core definition.  Having common code as part of core is a central part of how DefCore is driving OpenStack operability.

State of Application Developer Experience with OpenStack

When Matt Farina first started writing applications that ran in OpenStack clouds or worked against the APIs the experience was painful. Things are improving but his post reminds us that we have plenty of opportunities to improve.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Flint Calvin David J Hu
Fathi Boudra Syd Logan
JunichiMatayoshi Ryan Oshima
Talusani Mani Shanker Flint Calvin
Kaleb Pomeroy Ellen Hui
Lorcan Browne Michael Johnson
Jorge Chai Eyal Edri
Bob Thyne
Paul Kehrer
Nirmal Thacker
Alex Frolov
Nikita Gerasimov
Benedikt Trefzer
pk
Steve Heyman
Ryan Moats
Nanuk Krinner
John Vrbanac

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

The way I feel when upgrading my OpenStack cloud

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Mark Vanderwiel

This post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Mark Vanderwiel has been with IBM Systems & Technology Group for 27+ years. He has worked on development of many projects, most recently with energy management and OpenStack. Currently he’s working on the OpenStack Chef cookbooks in StackForge as a core contributor.

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

I have been most active in the StackForge OpenStack Chef cookbooks. This set of cookbooks is fairly new and growing at a fast pace.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I started with assembly on the 6502 (that’s old school Apple for you young guys), college with green terminals for nice pascal, then at IBM for 15 other languages. Now I focus on python and ruby for my Chef work.

3. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

In my office, looking out the window at the million dollar backup generator, life is good.

4. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

IRC #openstack-chef, #chef

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

The concept of handling cloud infrastructure with open source at first seemed like a wild idea. But after getting involved, it’s been a very interesting and encouraging experience. There are some great folks working on this.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 23 – 30)

MySQL Galera does *not* support SELECT … FOR UPDATE

It’s not as bad as it sounds but I think it’s worth mentioning here for two reasons: this conversation came as a result of putting developers and operators in the same room, again, in Atlanta. It proves that we’re on the right track to building cohesion among groups that have been perceived as separated (but never meant to be). The second reason is that on top of resolving real-life operational issues, this amazing OpenStack community finds ways to spark and quickly sedate an entertaing flame war on which SQL is better than yours. Worth reading the whole thread.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Past Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Security Notes and Advisories

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Marcelo Dieder Vern Hart
Kévin Bernard-Allies Sam Whyte
Rodrigo Duarte Pavel Kholkin
Kashyap Kopparam Manju Ramanathpura
Chris Dent Timothy R. Chavez
Andrey Pavlov Omri Gazitt
Martin Geisler Isabell Sippli
Benedikt Trefzer Alexey I. Froloff
Patrick Crews Mike May
Omri Gazitt John Schofield
chrisroberts Feodor Tersin
Nataliia Uvarova Ashwin Agate
Matthew Montgomery Michael Solberg
gdcabrera
Praveen Yalagandula
Feodor Tersin
Manuel Desbonnet

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

trying-to-fix-xml-api

Looking at the xml API implementation in nova

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 2 – 23)

Taking Stock of OpenStack’s Rapid Growth

With another successful OpenStack Summit in the books, Jonathan Bryce reflects on three big areas of maturity that are rapidly emerging for the project: user maturity, software maturity and a focus on cloud operations.

OpenStack Superuser

Superuser is a new online publication dedicated to the experiences of individuals who are running OpenStack clouds of all sizes, across all industries. The online publication lives at superuser.openstack.org.

How DefCore is going to change your world: three advisory cases

The first release of the DefCore Core Capabilities Matrix (DCCM) was revealed at the Atlanta summit. At the Summit, Joshua McKenty and Rob Hirschfeld had a session which examined what this means for the various members of the OpenStack community. A rather lengthy post reviews the same advisory material.

Community Office Hours

One of the requests in Atlanta was to setup carefully listening ears for developers and users alike so they can highlight roadblocks, vent frustration and hopefully also give kudos to people, suggest solutions, etc. The Community Managers have added two 1 hour slots to the OpenStack Meetings calendar

    • Tuesdays at 0800 UTC on #openstack-community (hosted by Tom)
    • Fridays at 1800 UTC on #openstack-community (hosted by Stefano)

so if you have anything you’d like the Foundation to be aware of please hop on the channel and talk to us. If you don’t/can’t use IRC, send us an email and we’ll use something else: just talk to us.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Other Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Security Notes and Advisories

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Zhou Yu Tim Pownall
Thanassis Parathyras Victor HU
Chuck Carlino Craig Jellick
Paul Kehrer Chris Dent
kedar kulkarni Nastya Urlapova
Radoslaw Smigielski Gaudenz Steinlin
Masco Kaliyamoorthy Ravi Vagadia
Srinivasa Acharya Federico Lucifredi
Gary W. Smith Susaant Kondapaneni
John Brogan Lorcan Browne
Lukas Bezdicka Hideaki Suzuki
Adam Harwell Kevin
Nikolay Makhotkin Masco Kaliyamoorthy
Federico Lucifredi Ethan Lynn
Ethan Lynn Dave Tucker
Jun Wu gangadhar singh
Sudheendra Murthy Vishal Thapar
Vasudev Kamath Rashmi P
Mark Sturdevant Zhou Yu
Shashank Gupta Swami Reddy
Gabriel Assis Bezerra Rodrigo Duarte
Phillip Toohill
Erik Moe
Chuck Carlino
Tim Potter
Esparta
Adam Harwell
Xiandong Meng
Robert Parker
Gal Sagie
Mitsuhiro Tanino
Kevin Mentzer
Henrique Truta
Gary W. Smith
Slawomir Bochenski

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

When having to review a long list of trivial spelling correction patches

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

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