Tag: community


Bring on the Crazy: Zero to Book in Five Days

February 21st, 2013 — 4:29pm

Well, since my team mate Everett has outed me as crazy (yes, it’s true), I think I’ve got some ‘splaining to do! It’s true, we’re crazy, but we’ve got to write that operator’s guide — for operators by operators. And if you know ops folks like I do, you realize quickly that these guys have hardly any time to write down their notes! We’re going to pluck them from their day jobs, fuel them with coffee, BBQ, and TexMex, and get to writing.

I’ve run doc sprints for OpenStack at various times on different scales, but this one is highly focused. So highly focused in fact that I’ve turned down people who wanted to attend but hadn’t run clouds day-to-day. Sorry guys! Super hyper focus, blinders on.

I had originally put the proposal together for the Google Summer of Code Doc Summit, which I attended in 2011, but out of 30+ applying organizations, we weren’t selected. Undaunted, I revised the proposal for the OpenStack Foundation to consider, and they are funding it!
1-IMG_3304
We’re gathering in the Willie Nelson room at the Austin Rackspace office next week, and we’re going to try a tool called BookType, hosted by Source Fabric. It’s the same tool I’ve worked with for book sprints with FLOSS Manuals, and it’s made specifically for sprinting. We’re using a pre-installed instance of it at http://openstack.booktype.pro. If you look at it today, it’s empty except for a Test book sandbox. By next week it’ll be bursting with content! The outline we’re working with to start is at https://etherpad.openstack.org/EssexOperationsGuide. Thanks to everyone who has reviewed it and commented so far.

You all are welcome to watch our progress next week at at http://openstack.booktype.pro and offer editing and reviewing as we go. Please realize it’s a pressure cooker of a week, and a real challenge. I’m saying, be helpful and encouraging so we can be productive and accurate. Once we’re done, ship it! We’ll have copies of the book available (likely for a donation initially to cover costs) by the end of next week.

If you want to hear all the gory details, we have a few opportunities. Next week, if you’re in Austin, come see us at the Austin OpenStack Meetup on Wednesday night. Then, at the Summit, we want to bare our souls at a panel titled, On Writing the OpenStack Operations Manual in 5 Days. Come see if we are crazy, or driven there this week.

Comment » | Communication, Documentation

Summary and Review of the 2012 Openstack China Tour

January 13th, 2013 — 12:25pm

In August 2012, the OpenStack Asia Pacific Technology Conference was successfully held in Beijing, Shanghai and the city, setting off public’s interest in OpenStack. On this basis, China OpenStack User Group(COSUG)  continues to work together with CSDN to further promote OpenStack in China, thus, a series of activities of the 8-city speech tour came into being.

The OpenStack Tour, which lasted three months, successfully ended in Wuhan on December 22.  This tour, which was organized by OpenStack user group (COSUG) and CSDN company, covered 8 big cities in China (Beijing, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Xi’an, Shanghai, Nanjing, Tianjin, Wuhan) Over 700 people participated in the on-site lectures and more than 30 people gave speeches. The event includes fantastic keynotes, which attracted more than 700 people to participate on site. The event provided a good exchange and communication platform for domestic developers and users of OpenStack, expanded the influence of the OpenStack community, and enhanced the OpenStack domestic level.

For the convenience of those who want to know more about this series of activities and OpenStack, we hereby write down the review and summary of the OpenStack China Tour activities. Hope you can further exchanges and communications between each other, therefore promote the development of OpenStack in China.

Content Guide:

1. 2012 Openstack China Tour Stop Cities

2. Enrollment and the Number of Participants

3. Lecturers

4. Review of Exciting Contents at the 8 Stops and Speech Downloading

5. Summary of Activities and Sharing of Operations Experience

1.      2012 Openstack China Tour Stop Cities

Initiated by Hui Cheng, the lead manager of China OpenStack community, and co-organized by   OpenStack User Group (COSUG) and CSDN, the 2012 OpenStack China Tour activities began on September 16, 2012, and ended on December 22, 2012, respectively covering Beijing, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Xi’an, Shanghai, Nanjing, Tianjin and Wuhan.

2.       Enrollment and the Number of Participants

 The recruitment of participants took full advantage of CSDN, who has a huge amount of developer members. The participants of each activity are really interested in this technology. Venues were sponsored by the guests involved in the activities. Among the eight venues, only Shenzhen was under AA system, and the others were lent for free by local volunteers. The total enrollment of the 8 events is1060 and the actual number of participants is 710.

3.      Lectures

The theme of which is around OpenStack, this series of activities convened companies and institutions principally engaged. The lecturers were front-line OpenStack engineers, OpenStack code contributors, developers, experienced users, etc. The total number of lecturers is 31, 7 at Beijing stop, 6 at Shenzhen stop, 6 at Chengdu stop, 4 at Xi’an stop, 7 at Shanghai stop, 7 at Nanjing stop, 5 at Tianjin stop and 5 at Wuhan stop. As the initiator of the 2012 OpenStack Tour, Hui Cheng attended the events held in six cities. Rongze Zhu, Storage Engineer of Sina Cloud Computing, also gave speeches at multiple stops.

Introduction to lectures and their topics

 Introduction to lectures and their topics

4.      Review of Exciting Contents at the 8 Stops

1)      Beijing Stop

OpenStack China Tour (Beijing Stop) was held in workplace of Shanda Innovations. Core contribution engineers from Intel, Sina, IBM, Gamewave etc. made presentations. Over 150 engineers attended this activity on-site. And more than half a hundred of engineers watched the whole meeting live through WebEx.

As the most influential OpenStack senior engineer and early evangelist in China, Hui Cheng gave a deep insight about the open ecosystem of OpenStack, and why OpenStack becomes so successful. Hui shared the latest OpenStack events happened both at home and abroad.

“Sina, Intel, IBM, Baidu, Netease, HiSoft, China Standard Software, Gamewave Ltd., Shanghai Jiaotong University has become the first wave of OpenStack players in China” said Hui Cheng, “They have already deployed OpenStack to their production or testing environment, and some of them is also the active corporate contributor in OpenStack projects. For example, Sina has already contributed more than 100 patches in the OpenStack Folsom release, and definitely will have more in Grizzly.”

In addition, Hui Cheng said, “Sina will join hands with some companies, such as Intel, IBM, and other major Chinese corporate contributors, to unite the R & D resources, and jointly develop for some project blueprint, thereby to enlarge the contribution from China.

Topics:

Topic 1: OpenStack and OpenStack Foundation

Topic 2: Brief Introduction to OpenStack Virtualization Technology

Topic 3: Introduction to Quantum, its structure and practice

Topic 4: OpenStack block Device Storage Services

Topic 5: Deploy OpenStack with Chef

Topic 6: Explanation of Keystone

Topic 7: Thinking of Cloud Computing

Detailed Report on Beijing Stop

http://www.openstack.org/blog/2012/09/openstack-china-tour-beijing/

Speech materials of Beijing Stop Downloading:

http://download.csdn.net/download/baozi0/4574729

 Video Downloading:

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNDUxNTE1Nzc2.html

2)      Shenzhen Stop

The Shenzhen Stop Activity was held in 3Wcoffee. It was the first time that OpenStack came to Southern China. This event attracted over 80 on-site attendees. Most of them were Cloud specialists, IT engineers, as well as OpenStack users from Canton, Shenzhen, Hong Kong and Hangzhou etc.

Topics:

Topic 1: Development Practice of Building Public Cloud Platform Based on OpenStack

Topic 2: OpenStack in Hong Kong

Topic 3: Swift Architecture and Practice

Topic 4: OpenStack Block Device Storage Services Cinder

Topic 5: Juju – Make Your Life Easier in the Cloud

Issue 6: OpenStack – The Best Private Cloud Infrastructure for Enterprises

Detailed Report on Shenzhen Stop Activity:

http://www.openstack.org/blog/2012/09/openstack-china-tour-2-shenzhen/

Speech Materials of Shenzhen Stop Downloading:

http://www.csdn.net/article/2012-09-22/2810244-OpenStack_china_tour_Shenzhen

Video Downloading:

http://download.csdn.net/detail/baozi0/4588357

3)      Chengdu Stop

The Chengdu stop event was held at e Coffee in Tianfu Software Park in Chengdu. Hui Cheng, community manager of China OpenStack User Group (COSUG), led engineers from Redhat, Ubuntu, Sina and IBM to this event. All of them made wonderful presentations, which attracted about 100 stackers to participate in this activity.


Topics:

Topic 1: StackLab: An Open OpenStack Lab

Topic2: Introduction for libvirt architecture and APIs

Topic 3: Juju – Make Your Life Easier in the Cloud

Topic4: Adoption OpenStorage with Openstack

Topic 5: Swift Architecture and Practice

Topic 6: Introduction to Quantum, its structure and practice

Detailed Report on Chengdu Stop Activity:

http://freedomhui.com/2012/11/chian-openstack-tour-chengdu/

Speech Materials of Chengdu Stop Downloading:

http://download.csdn.net/detail/baozi0/4699418
http://download.csdn.net/detail/baozi0/4700507

4)      Xi’an Stop

The Xi’an stop event was held at Qing Feng Plaza, Software Park in Xi’an. Engineers from RedHat, Sina and Stackform attended this event. All of them made wonderful presentations, which attracted about 110 stackers to participate in this activity.

Topics:

Topic 1: Practice of OpenStack Public Cloud

Topic 2: The OpenSource OpenStack+OpenShift

Topic 3: OpenStack Block Device Storage Services Cinder

Topic 4: Incubation Cloud Management Platform Based on OpenStack

Detailed Report on Xi’an Stop Activity:

http://freedomhui.com/2012/11/china-openstack-tour-xian/

5)      Shanghai Stop

The Shanghai Stop event was held in an innovation workshop. Engineers from Sina, Intel, trystack.cn, and Dell gave wonderful speeches. Around 40 OpenStack enthusiasts attended this event on-site.

Topics:

Topic 1: Practice of OpenStack Public Cloud

Topic 2: Practice of OpenStack Public Cloud

Topic 3: Swift Infrastructure and its Key Technologies

Topic 4: Cinder Project Status and New Feature for Grizzly

Topic 5: Swift Performance Measurement and Tuning

Topic 6: Internal process of Quantum

Topic 7: Nova and Virtual Machine Management

Detailed Report on Shanghai Stop Activity:

http://adali.iteye.com/blog/1730445

Speech Materials of Shanghai Stop Downloading:

http://openstack.group.iteye.com/group/topic/35090

6)      Nanjing Stop

The Nanjing Stop event was held in Gulou Campus of Nanjing University. As one of the founders of China OpenStack User Group (COSUG), Yujie Du gave a speech at the event. Cloud computing architect from 360buy, Manager of NEC Development Department, OpenStack community developers, Ubuntu developers and technical pre-research engineer from ZTE the Openstack gave wonderful speeches. The number of on-site audience was more than 70.

Topics:

Topic 1: Introduction to OpenStack Foundation and the Community

Topic 2: Realization of 360buy ELB

Topic 3: Applicatios Based on OpenStack and Openflow/SDN

Topic 4: Internal Process of Quantum

Topic 5: OpenStack+OpenShift

Topic 6: Juju – Make Your Life Easier in the Cloud

Topic 7: OpenStack Operational Needs and Practice in Telecommunications Industry

Detailed Report on Nanjing Stop Activity:

http://www.csdn.net/article/2012-11-29/2812349-OpenStack_china_tour_nanjing

Speech Materials Downloading:

 http://download.csdn.net/detail/adela_09/4825545

7)      Tianjin Stop

The Tianjin Stop event was held in the Tianjin Economic and Technological Development Zone. Representatives from the four major open source platforms (OpenStack, CloudStack, Eucalyptus, OpenNebula) got together and explored the future development of OpenStack.

Topics:

Topic 1: Commercial Thinking on OpenStack

Topic 2: Experience Sharing of Developing Public Cloud Solutions Based on OpenStack

Topic 3: The development of CloudStack and its China Community

Topic 4: Experience Sharing of Developing and Infrastructure Analysis of OpenNebula

Topic 5: Introduction to Eucalyptus Components

Topic 6: Panel

In the panel forum, Hui Cheng (OpenStack user group (COSUG) Administrator), Xuehui Li (CloudStack Committer), Qingye Jiang (Eucalyptus Account Director), China cloud Junwei Liu (computing researcher of Academy of Telecommunications Research) launched a discussion. Each of them introduced their most successful open-source platform deployments.

Detailed Report on Tianjin Stop Activity:

http://www.csdn.net/article/2012-12-14/2812845-the_DNA_of_open_IaaS

Speech Materials Dowloading:

http://download.csdn.net/detail/baozi0/4868518 

http://www.youku.com/playlist_show/id_18680644.html

8)      Wuhan Stop

The Wuhan Stop event was held in Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Experts from Sina, Zhongda Huanyu, and OS-Easy gave speeches on the following topics.

Topic 1: The Road of Cloud Computing Adoption—OpenStack Open Source Cloud Platform

Topic 2: Deploy and Manage OpenStack on Crowbar

Topic 3: Practice of Build Server virtualization Based on OpenStack

 Topic 4: Integration Practice of OpenStack and Hadoop

Detailed Report on Wuhan Stop Activity:

http://adali.iteye.com/blog/1753943

  1. Summary of Activities and Sharing of Operations Experience

The activities of the the “OpenStack line” is a community collaboration Technical Tour of exploration. In the case of commercial sponsorship, community activities are often faced with three questions: Lecturer, venue and participants. The event lecturers are volunteers, travel expenses own burden, activities to attract so much lecturer to join, thanks to OpenStack have accumulated under the core members of the user group in China more than a year operations. Eight venues of the city, only Shenzhen is using the AA system, others are lent free of charge by local volunteers. Recruitment of participants take full advantage of the CSDN advantage of the huge amount of developers Member, participants of each event are really this crowd interested in technology.

The event has accumulated a lot of experience.

How to push offline activities to online. Offline activities have pros and cons. Interactivity is the advantage. Face-to-face communication is the most efficient. In the beginning of promoting technologies such communication is really needed. The disadvantage is that such communications are costy.  In order to make offline activities as fruitful and influential as possible, collecting materials accessible online is need as much as possible, such as speech scripts, photos, video, and reports.

On-site activities. Organizers were multitaskers, who were responsible for registering, contacting lectures, hosting meetings, reminding, taking photo, several roles to manage the conference attendance, Lecturer Contact presided over the meeting, reporting, etc. It would be better if some people are willing to take some tasks, if they don’t want, the tasks should be in order. Contacting lectures and controlling time are the most important, followed by collecting materials. Here is a tip. Here is a tip. You’d better collect speech materials as soon as the conference ends. Otherwise, you have to ask lectures email you their speech materials. If this is the case, you have to wait for a long time. So the priority after the activity is to post the materials collected online.

Meeting Application Control. To organize an offline activity, two extremes should be avoided. If few people, the scene looks empty. If too many people, it would be crowded. Attendees would feel uncomfortable. At the stage of releasing and promoting the activity,     organizers should know how to make full use of the accessible resources. Promote from the core to the periphery. When the number of applicants reaches the expected goal, you do not have to re-accumulate marketing resources. In accordance with the experience of organizing community activities, to have 50% applicants attend the activity is reasonable.

Location. Previous community activities helped bring some free venue, which can be reused .For the venue provider, supporting community activities is a good way to improve the company’s reputation. And if the activities are responding the company’s business, this is like requesting experts to deliver free trainings for employees. Software Parks and software base in some cities can also be sponsors. But in practice, free venues were gotten by using personal relationships, such as friendship, colleagueship, former colleagueship, and so on.

If you can’t find a suitable venue by using some existing resources, you can seek help in mail group. Such as sending requests in COSUG mail group. But be sure to write clearly all your needs in one email. Otherwise, your frequent emails would disturb others. Internet search  is also a good way. For instace, by googling keywords, “**community”, “community activities” to find related persons in charge. Generally, these people are active online. You can be linked to these people through various activities pages and microblogging. These people usually have some resources at the local, and are very kind.

After visiting so many venues looking down, we find they all have advantages and disadvantages. Offices in companies have good conditions, but they are usually not air-conditioned on weekends, sometimes, you may run into blackout. In addition, security measures are strict and you have to registration at the door. Cafes possess comfortable environment, but they charge and the space is limited. Big university classrooms are wonderful. But for foreign participants who are unfamiliar with the campus, they have to waste some seeking the specific classroom which is usually not identifed on a map. Software parks and software bases are extremely good, but you’d have to hold the activity there during the working day. Because on weekends, there are people in such work places far away from the downtown.

Like lectures, alternative venues are also needed. Lots of lectures and audience will gather at one specific place at the same time. If the activity is cancelled due to venue problems, many people will be sad and disappointed, what’s worse, once this kind of unreliability spreads out , it would be more difficult to gather people next time.

Concern about participants. Because community activities are frequently held on weekends, Participants are more enthusiastic than other people will be more enthusiasm. They are the resource of volunteers. Hosts and organizers should communicate with these potential volunteers at the scene. Reunions after the activity are a good way.

Volunteers. Lots of volunteers are needed community activities. Some organizers think the recruitment of volunteers is very simple, just listing tasks, and waiting for claim. However, some organizers don’t think this is easy. This is a matter of opinion. Actually, many volunteers claim voluntary work by themselves. So clearly write down organizers’ email addresses or phone number on the propaganda or in email. This allows those who are interested to easily find you. Another method is to collect. List stuffs and tasks that need volunteers’ assistance in email or microblog. Then people would apply. Most volunteers are students, some are those who are very active in community.

Chinese Version of this post: http://blog.csdn.net/ichbinwasser/article/details/8447542(Author: CSDN)

Comment » | community, Meetup

Vietnam OpenStack Community 2nd Meeting

January 8th, 2013 — 8:53am

Following the success of the first Vietnam OpenStack Community (VietOpenStack) meetup, the second meeting has been held at Marcel Dassault amphitheater, Francophone Institute for Informatics (IFI-VNU) on 4th January, 2013. There were approx. 50 people attending this event. We warmly welcomed:

  • Representatives from IT Business Management level: Mr. Nguyen Huc Quoc – Director of e-government center, Department of Information and Technology, Ministry of Information and Technology, Mr. Nguyen Hong Quang – Chairman of Vietnam Free and Open Source Software Association (VFOSSA), Mr. Nguyen The Trung – Managing Director of DTT Technology Group (DTT), Mr. Do Hoang Khanh – Former CTO of Citibank Global, a senior expert on IT of DTT, Mr. Tran Luong Son – Director of Vietsoftware, Mr. Le Phuoc Thanh – Managing Director of VidaGis…
  • Representatives from ICT companies: Vietsoftware, Netnam, iWay, VidaGis, Viami Software, DTT …
  • Members of VietOpenStack start-up team: Translation sub-team, Technical sub-team…
  • Teachers and students from technology university: Francophone Institute for Informatics (VNU-IFI), Hanoi University of Industry (HaIU), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST)…

The 2nd VietOpenStack meetup took place in a friendly, enthusiastic and full-of-energy atmosphere and the “Open” spirit was clearly shown in every presentation and discussion of the participants. Starting the show, Mr. Nguyen The Trung, Managing Director of DTT introduced the agenda of VietOpenStack Meetup 2 and special guests.

Mr. Nguyen The Trung, Managing Director of DTT, introduced VietOpenStack Meetup 2 agenda.

Main contents of 2nd Meeting include:

  1. OpenStack Demo
  2. Translation of OpenStack Documents
  3. OpenStack experience sharing of an IT expert
  4. Q&A and future plan

 1.  OpenStack Demo

Mr. Nguyen Thanh Hai from Netnam introduced his company as one of the Internet Service Provider (ISP) company providing internet and network services. He then conducted a demonstration on OpenStack installing model.

Mr. Nguyen Thanh Hai from Netnam demonstrated OpenStack installing model

2. Discussion on OpenStack Translation

Ms. Le Phuong Nga, member of OpenStack Translation team from DTT, started her presentation by introducing all members of the OpenStack translation and reviewing teams. She then briefed on recent team activities and translation progress in which Vietnam has completed 9% of the translation work. She also raised some translated related issues while her team doing the translation to the community, such as difficulty in getting the translated work reviewed by the reviewing team.

Ms. Lê Phương Nga, member of OpenStack Translation team from DTT, with her presentation on OpenStack translation.

3. OpenStack experience from a senior IT expert

Mr. Do Hoang Khanh, former CTO of CitiBank Global and a 30 year experience IT consultant of DTT Technology Group, is a person who is passionate about open source movement. He also attended the OpenStack Summit last October in San Diego. He shared with the participants his personal experiences and knowledge on OpenStack. What a touching presentation he has given for this meetup event!

Mr. Do Hoang Khanh, former CTO of CitiBank Global and a senior IT consultant of DTT Technology Group, sharing his experience on OpenStack.

4. Q&A and future plan

Although there were some questions and answers during the whole meeting, group discussion really started when beers and snacks, sponsored by DTT, were served to the attendants. People drank and shared more openly on OpenStack and opportunities it could bring to ICT companies in Vietnam. Everyone was eager for the next meetup, which is tentatively to be held in Ho Chi Minh city. And yes, discussion for Meeting 3 is on the mailing list now. It will be announced very soon :-)

We especially thank Mr. Nguyen Hong Quang, Chairman of VFOSSA and his team for being so supportive in organizing the meetup place. Great hospitalities has made to the success of VietOpenStack Meeting 2.

It’s time for meetup dinner

5. VietOpenStack contact details:

 

Comment » | community, Documentation, Event, Meetup

1st Swiss OpenStack User Group

December 5th, 2012 — 5:27pm

The first Swiss OpenStack user meeting  took place on 15th November 2012 at ETH in Zurich. The meeting was a combination of the Swiss OpenStack user group along with the zhgeeks regular meeting.

Around 90 people attended which provided for a lively atmosphere with a good opportunity for audience interaction and participation. Photos are here. Discussions continued well on into the night taking advantage of Zurich’s fine gastronomy and beverages.

ICCLab Introduction

Thomas M. Bohnert gave an overview of the ICCLab which covered the role of the InIT Cloud Computing Lab’s investigations in cloud technologies. Some of the lightning talks later covered some areas of ICCLab research.

CERN and OpenStack

Tim Bell gave a rapid overview of OpenStack architecture, news from the summit, the foundation structure and use of OpenStack at CERN.  The tools and procedures in use in the CERN computer centre are being adapted to be more sustainable and efficient by engaging and adapting open source solutions. Slides are available here.

He had a lot of ground to cover in 30 minutes! Given that the audience ranged from relative novices in OpenStack up to those deploying, it is also a wide range of details to cover in a single talk.

Amongst the questions were what is the impact of moving towards clouds on the current MONARC grid model as used by the WLCG. One of the common challenges for CERN is how to solve the “Changing the engine while the plane is flying” problem.  Even though there is an extended shutdown of the LHC during 2013/2014 in order to ugrade to higher energy, the physics analysis of the data taken in the first run from 2010 to 2012 will continue. Any major architecture changes on the grid must be performed in a staged fashion as there are over 130 sites and 200,000 servers to consider so big bang migrations are not realistic. Thus, the approach we are taking is one of running the grid services on top of the CERN private cloud. This allows us to gain improvements in efficiency via more dynamic workload placement and simplified operations procedures without needing to break compatibility. As the users of the service wish, resources can be moved between standard batch services on the grid and those available as VMs on the cloud.

Following up from this question was whether the other centres in the WLCG would be following the same approach. Each tier-1 is an independent organisation and can make its own choices within the framework of the WLCG. CERN is just one of the sites and each of the sites are able to make their own decisions based on individual requirements. Research into areas such as federated clouds is ongoing but no decisions for production federated clouds have been made.

Developing OpenStack APIs

Thijs Metsch from Intel gave a lightning talk on developing OpenStack APIs. Since OpenStack is a modular architecture, it is possible to plug in additional API functionality. This process is made more straightforward by the use of WSGI and python. Examples of this already implemented are the OCCI API and others such as CDMI are also coming along. Cloudscaling recently announced their implementation of the Google Compute Engine API for OpenStack. Thus, the choice of API can be made independently from the choice of IaaS technology.

Thijs demonstrated how this could be done by creating a simple python RESTful API and showed us the python code to implement it.


ICCLab Proof of Concept

Fabrice Manhart from the ICCLab presented the ICCLab proof of concept OpenStack cloud. ICCLab use Foreman and Puppet, as do CERN, and have good experiences with this combination. Being able to re-install their 15 hypervisors in 15 minutes is a typical case.

Swiss Academic Cloud Proof of Concept

Dean Flanders from Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research /SwiN presented their OpenStack based cloud which is testing out new computing models in a research environment. They selected OpenStack for its flexibility (and price :-). Their cloud allows researchers to provision their own machines rapidly. Amongst the areas they are investigating is the use of flash storage, aiming to reach 100TB SSD capacity. This approach follows work in the SDSC on Gordon which is a 16K cores 300TB flash based facility using OpenStack and ScaleMP.

While it is still early days for OpenStack, they are looking into new areas such as cloud bursting and workload balancing.

Software Defined Networking at ICCLab

Philipp Aeschlimann from ICCLab presented the current status of software-defined networking and their investigations as part of ICCLab. There is a lot of interest in the OpenStack community around these features and Quantum functionality covers many features. There was a live demonstration given showing OpenStack Folsom, Quantum and Floodlight.

OpenStack at SWITCH

SWITCH  provide facilities for the universities and academic organisations in Switzerland. Joel Casutt presented their early work to extend their existing services to include cloud services based on OpenStack. They are currently building up the hardware aiming to provide a free pilot service in April. During the summer, this experience will be reviewed along with the charging structure to be used going forward.

CloudBroker

Wibke Sudholt from Cloudbroker  presented their open source broker solution. Within the SCIentific gateway Based User Support (SCI-BUS) EU FP7 project, CloudBroker has extended its CloudBroker Platform so that it now also allows access to Amazon and IBM public clouds as well as to private cloud infrastructures based on OpenStack and Eucalyptus. While the initial aims were to use the EC2 API in OpenStack, there were some missing features and functionalities such as auto-deployment so it was necessary to use some of the OpenStack APIs to achieve full function. Using OpenStack clouds in universities allowed this porting to be done without having to set up their own OpenStack instance. The XML support was also not as good as JSON in some areas.

Thoughts

Even in a country with a small population such as Switzerland, there are many areas of OpenStack work. Per-capita, the Swiss user group attracted 5 times more people that the Chinese user group meeting (where 3,000 people attended). There was only time for 6 lightning sessions of 10 minutes but we are now planning the second meeting to allow those who could not show their work!

Many of the attendees were investigating/testing proof of concepts. The number of production deployments are small amongst those attending. As this is often the first investigations into cloud services, this is not too surprising. Many of the deployments were using Puppet as well. During the evening, we discussed the competition for talent. Given that many CERN people are on short term contracts, the interest in OpenStack and Puppet skills makes for a good skill on their CVs.

A recent blog  on comparing Google trends follows similar lines. The interactive report is here . Unfortunately, there is not enough data from Switzerland to determine the interest in different cloud products.

Overall, there was a lot of enthusiasm but this was balanced with caution that comes from uncovering some of the difficulities to understand clouds and how best to deploy OpenStack.

The most frequent question at the end was “When will we meet up again?”. Stay tuned for more CHOSUG!

Comment » | community, Meetup

Vietnam OpenStack Community launch 30/9/2012 – report by Hang Tran

November 30th, 2012 — 4:16pm

Good day, everyone!

Warmest greetings from Vietnam OpenStack Community.

We had a great meetup last night! This is all that we can say :-).

Hosted by Hanoi University of  Industry (HAUI), the Library Hall, where the meetup held, was full of people from different organizations, ICT companies and universities.  We especially welcomed Mr. Nguyen Hong Quang, Chairmain of Vietnam Free and Open Source Software Association (VFOSSA), other members of VFOSSA, people from ICT companies such as NetNam, iWay, EcoIT, DTT… and HAUI students. To our surprise, there are almost 100 people has attended this event.

The meetup was a bit formal in the beginning when VFOSSA and OpenStack were introduced. The students seemed a bit nervous (although we could still see the exciting expression on their face) as OpenStack is completely a new term to them. But the Library Hall was heating up slowly when the discussion started; beers and breads are brought up to the table to keep the day-end brains running :-). People were eating and speaking elatedly. The atmosphere was more and more relaxing then.

During the event, the attendants had a chance to listen to Mr. Nguyen Hoang’s OpenStack Summit notes sent back from the States. Mr. Hoang is a senior architect with 30 years of expertise in providing solution to software and big system architecture in America. He attended the OpenStack Fall Summit (held in San Diego, USA last mid October) and the notes were about his experiences to share with others. We could see that the words from the heart of such an experienced expert greatly inspired all the attendants that night.

Warmly welcomed at the meeting was the presence of Dr. Nguyen Tuan Hoa, a senior consultant on IT solution with 38 years of experience in the IT field. He was a member of the famous team who built the first computer of Vietnam (and one of the very first few of the world) – the VT83 in 1983. He especially shared his lifetime experience to the people available at the meetup, especially to the students. As I recall he said that “This is a big opportunity for Vietnam. We shouldn’t miss this just like we have missed few other big opportunities. This is the “now or never” time for Vietnamese ICT community to get on board the “OpenStack ship” so that we are not left behind this global endeavour”.

Sincere thanks goes to Hanoi University of Industry for the great hospitalities provided.

And special thanks to our speakers:

- Mr. Nguyen Hong Quang, Chairman of Vietnam Free and Open Source Software Association (VFOSSA) for his introduction on VFOSSA and how VFOSSA will support OpenStack’s activities.

- Mr. Nguyen The Trung, Managing Director of DTT for his presentation on OpenStack, its opportunities for Vietnam and the development of Vietnam OpenStack Community in the long run.

- Mr. Nguyen Duc Quyen, Director of Consultant department of DTT for his updates on the recent Melbourne meetup, which he has attended on 20th November this year.

As the result of our first meetup, more than 20 people have volunteered to join the Start-up team. We are now looking forward to re-structuring this team and getting things moving for OpenStack. One of our main objective is to start translating OpenStack manuals. For this, we really need help from OpenStack community. Any ideas, suggestions are welcomed and appreciated for an OpenStack starter like us.

Our next likely meetup to be held in Danang city next month. We will inform you all on our upcoming activities.

I will be back soon with updates with you guys on the OpenStack movement in Vietnam.

 Vietnam OpenStack Community coordinator – Hang Tran

For more information or to join the group please email Hang or enquire at www.dtt.vn

Comment » | community, Meetup

A lot of OpenStack events worldwide before 2012 ends

November 13th, 2012 — 3:59pm

The list of OpenStack events in 2012 is still growing towards another record year. Before the supposed end of the world, we’ll have the chance to meet in Zürich, Delhi and other cities in India, Melbourne and other Australian cities, Tel Aviv, various places in China, Paris and London. The full list as of today is below but I wouldn’t be surprised if more will appear on the events page in the next days.

Experts at NASA say the world will not end in 2012, though, so we’re already preparing for the 2013 events.

Comment » | Communication, community, Event

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Oct 26-Nov 2)

November 2nd, 2012 — 12:22pm

Highlights of the week

Videos of OpenStack Summit Fall 2012 published

The Summit was packed with amazing content, including user stories from Cisco WebEx, Living Social and CERN, 100+ developer working sessions and two full days of workshops. We now have more than 80 videos ready to view from the keynotes and breakout presentations:

What did you like and how would you improve the OpenStack Summit?

We’re working hard to make each Summit better than the last. Please help us by taking this quick survey about your experience in San Diego by Friday, November 9.

Welcome StackMeat.org

Born from a personal itch by Márton Kiss, he contributed a central place where to find informations about existing projects of wider OpenStack ecosystem.

CloudEnvy – vagrant for OpenStack

What’s CloudEnvy? Joe Heck says it is “the most interesting illustration of CloudEnvy is using it to spin up an instance in a cloud, and then run devstack in that instance.”

EMEA OpenStack Day: Call For Speakers & Prospectus For Sponsors

EMEA OpenStack Day is happening Wednesday, December 5, 2012 in London. You can find out more details about the event on the OpenStack Day EventBrite page. Nominations are open for speaker presentations. The deadline for speaker submissions is November 9, 2012. The sponsor prospectus is now available online. There are five available event sponsor packages.

Multifactor Auth and Keystone

The topic of how to enforce multifactor authentication with Keystone tokens came up often during the Design Summit in San Diego. Adam Young wrote a summary of the discussions. Link to the blueprint.

PKI tokens and Horizon

With PKI, tokens have gone from 40 byte to 3000.  This plus additional payload in Horizon means that they no longer fit inside an HTTP cookie.  How do we deal with this?

Tips and tricks

Upcoming Events

Other news

Welcome new contributors

Celebrating the first patches submitted this month by:

Melanie Witt, Yahoo!

  • Matthias Runge, RedHat
  • long-wang, CS2C
  • Rainya Mosher, Rackspace
  • James Page, Ubuntu
  • Pedro Navarro Perez,
  • Gerardo Porras, Yahoo!
  • Guang-yee, HP
  • Davanum Srinivas
  • Sathish Nagappan, Nebula
  • galstrom21, Rackspace
  • David Kang, ISI
  • Andrea Rosa, HP
  • jking-6, Internap
  • sathish-nagappan, Nebula
  • Alex Handle
  • Dan Radez, RedHat
  • Michael H Wilson
  • Jolyon Brown
  • Derrick J. Wippler
  • boden, IBM

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Comment » | Communication, community, Newsletter

Learn More About VMware’s Involvement with OpenStack at the Summit

October 5th, 2012 — 7:11pm

OpenStack Summit Event 2012
October 15-18

Learn More About VMware’s Involvement with OpenStack at the Following Sessions

Monday (11:00am – 11:40am Oxford) True Hybrid Clouds: Extending OpenStack with Cloud Foundry
John Purrier (AppFog)

Tuesday (2:40pm – 3:20pm Manchester E) OpenStack Networking (Quantum) Project Update
Dan Wendlandt (VMware)

Wednesday (9:30am – 10:00am Grand Ballroom) Running the World’s Largest Open Cloud
Troy Toman (Rackspace)

Wednesday (11:00am -11:40am Manchester A) How DreamHost Builds a Public Cloud with OpenStack
Carl Perry (DreamHost)

Wednesday (11:00am -11:40am Manchester D) How VMware is Contributing to OpenStack
Steve Herrod (VMware)

Wednesday (2:40pm – 3:20pm Manchester A) OpenStack@eBay: Practical SDN Deployment with Quantum
J.C. Martin (eBay)

Wednesday (4:30pm – 5:10pm Manchester A) Running Quantum on Quantum@Nicira’s Multi-Tenant OpenStack
Somik Behera (VMware)

Thursday (9:00am – 9:40am Manchester E) Hands on Quantum Deployment Workshop
Dan Wendlandt (VMware)

How VMware is Contributing to OpenStack
Steve Herrod, CTO, VMware
Wednesday, October 17 (11:00am – 11:40am)

Did you know that VMware is a top-10 code and bugfix contributor to OpenStack and that VMware has helped customers with OpenStack production deployments? In this session, learn how customers are using OpenStack with VMware offerings like ESX, Cloud Foundry and RabbitMQ. Walk away with a better understanding of VMware’s plans with OpenStack and the software defined data center as well as VMware’s efforts around expanding Nicira’s contributions to Quantum and Open vSwitch.

Lightning Talk: Managing VMware ESX and Virtual Center with OpenStack
Sean Chen, VMware Engineering
Wednesday, October 17 (1:15pm)

Come engage with VMware engineering about how to provide support for VMware’s hypervisor in OpenStack.

Visit the VMware Booth

Stop by the VMware booth and learn how VMware Network Virtualization enables advanced OpenStack networking and how Cloud Foundry extends VMware’s commitment to Open PaaS. Ask questions, have a discussion or run through a demo and walk away with a better understanding of VMware’s relationship with OpenStack.

Comment » | community, Event

Providing a Unified View of OpenStack Projects

September 27th, 2012 — 5:30pm

The OpenStack project is in fact many projects, developed by hundreds of people, tens of companies, used by thousands. These projects are managed via a number of email lists as well as software engineering tools such like wiki, issue trackers, version control, continuous integration, etc. From my perspective as the Community Manager, achieving a coherent view of all the information is tedious and immensely difficult. I can imagine that community members and corporate members are struggling with the same issues and perhaps even additional ones.

Thus, we are undergoing an integration project to achieve interoperability of content within and between OpenStack projects with dashboards, reports, traceability, and faceted search. We have embarked on a pilot project with zAgile, using their open source Wikidsmart platform, which is an integration platform for software engineering tools as well as other applications like Help Desk (Zendesk, OTRS, etc.) and CRM (Salesforce, SugarCRM, etc.). zAgile has some interesting customer examples using its platform to unite their environment such as SIX, the company responsible for Switzerland’s financial infrastructure.

The intention is to give the community a way to answer questions like: who’s contributing to that particular feature of OpenStack? What is that developer working on? How many work hours/lines of code went into adding that feature/blueprint? What are users saying about OpenStack? With the Wikidsmart prototype we have integrated information across different systems to give corporate and community users a unified view of all the efforts going into OpenStack in real-time. The system answers questions with faceted search of concepts across all the different repositories, tracing people and artifacts across different repositories and bug tracker in order to reconcile people and corresponding contributions.

We are excited to share with you the results of the pilot and solicit your feedback in the following ways:

With the integration, we know that we can become a much more efficient project in terms of communicating to members, monitoring our progress, and getting work done. I hope you can join me in discussing this important topic, and I look forward to your thoughts as comments to this blog, in person at OpenStack Summit, and in the survey.

Comment » | Communication, community, Webinar

OpenStack Folsom Is Here With The Schedule Of The Summit

September 27th, 2012 — 12:29pm

Another release for OpenStack today, the sixth in a little over two years.  Folsom, or 2012.2 has two new services Networking (Quantum) and Block Storage (Cinder) services, architected in line with the OpenStack philosophy of pluggability and extensibility. While work was underway to establish the new OpenStack Foundation, our thriving community once again delivered the release on-time and with all planned essential features.

The most impressive feature for me is the amount of people and companies that contributed to it: over 330 people from almost 50 companies. Not only the quantity of people involved in OpenStack Folsom has increased compared to the previous release Essex, but also the diversity of the echosystem increased. The study contributed by Bitergia shows how the ecosystem evolved between the two releases, increasing in size and diversity.

It’s time for yet another celebration before we head up to San Diego for the OpenStack Summit where we’ll start planning the next six months and Grizzly. The schedule for the Summit has been published: take advantage of the discount until the end of September (save $200) on the registration fee and come meet this amazing OpenStack community live in San Diego.

Comment » | Communication, community

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