Tag: metrics


Introducing the OpenStack Activity Board

April 11th, 2013 — 2:15pm

I am pleased to announce that a beta release of the OpenStack Activity Board (beta) is now live. The development Activity Board announced few months ago provides a visual overview of all the OpenStack public activity of community members across multiple dimensions: contributors and organizations, projects and tools. From a single interface, you can easily surf OpenStack project content, whether it is coming from the LaunchPad bug tracker, Git or Gerrit, all mapped against the OpenStack Foundation members database.

The Vision Behind the Activity Board

The intention is to give the community a way to answer very precise questions like: who’s contributing to that particular feature of OpenStack? What is that developer/company working on? Which commits/changes are related to a particular bug? Who’s joined the development community recently? With the Activity Board, we have integrated information across the different systems used to develop OpenStack to give corporate and community users a unified view of all the efforts going into OpenStack. There are two main parts of the Activity Board: the Dash and the Insights. The Dash contains reports built by Bitergia using the free software suite MetricsGrimoire, it focuses on trends and quantitative presentation. The Insights, enriched with a semantic layer, powered by zAgile’s open source Wikidsmart adds qualitative details with faceted search of concepts across all the different repositories, tracing people and artifacts across different repositories and bug tracker in order to reconcile people and corresponding contributions.

Looking to the Future

With the integration, we know that we can become a much more efficient project in terms of communicating to members, monitoring our progress, and getting work done. The project is its infancy and we wish to continue to evolve the solution and enhance it with everyone’s feedback. First of all we need you to look at the data and let us know if you find any mistake (we’re keeping a log of known issues). There are a number of areas we want to consider, for example:

  • Streamline the faceted search interface according to the community’s desires
  • Add more reports based on community requests
  • Add integration with other OpenStack project data sources (blueprints, mailing lists, Ask, user groups, IRC)
  • Potentially enable interoperability (which is inherent in the Wikidsmart abilities) so that an event in one tool, for example LaunchPad, kicks off another action or update within another tool
  • Remove the dependency on Confluence, port the visualization to an open source wiki or portal,
  • Publish all the code and tools, integrate the Activity board in the OpenStack infrastructure processes

Learn More

If you would like to learn more, we are featuring the OpenStack Activity Board in the upcoming events:

I look forward to your comments and further collaboration to make sure this solution benefits the whole community to the maximum extent.

Comment » | Communication, community, Development, Measurement, Tools, Webinar

Providing a Unified View of OpenStack Projects

September 27th, 2012 — 5:30pm

The OpenStack project is in fact many projects, developed by hundreds of people, tens of companies, used by thousands. These projects are managed via a number of email lists as well as software engineering tools such like wiki, issue trackers, version control, continuous integration, etc. From my perspective as the Community Manager, achieving a coherent view of all the information is tedious and immensely difficult. I can imagine that community members and corporate members are struggling with the same issues and perhaps even additional ones.

Thus, we are undergoing an integration project to achieve interoperability of content within and between OpenStack projects with dashboards, reports, traceability, and faceted search. We have embarked on a pilot project with zAgile, using their open source Wikidsmart platform, which is an integration platform for software engineering tools as well as other applications like Help Desk (Zendesk, OTRS, etc.) and CRM (Salesforce, SugarCRM, etc.). zAgile has some interesting customer examples using its platform to unite their environment such as SIX, the company responsible for Switzerland’s financial infrastructure.

The intention is to give the community a way to answer questions like: who’s contributing to that particular feature of OpenStack? What is that developer working on? How many work hours/lines of code went into adding that feature/blueprint? What are users saying about OpenStack? With the Wikidsmart prototype we have integrated information across different systems to give corporate and community users a unified view of all the efforts going into OpenStack in real-time. The system answers questions with faceted search of concepts across all the different repositories, tracing people and artifacts across different repositories and bug tracker in order to reconcile people and corresponding contributions.

We are excited to share with you the results of the pilot and solicit your feedback in the following ways:

With the integration, we know that we can become a much more efficient project in terms of communicating to members, monitoring our progress, and getting work done. I hope you can join me in discussing this important topic, and I look forward to your thoughts as comments to this blog, in person at OpenStack Summit, and in the survey.

Comment » | Communication, community, Webinar

OpenStack Folsom Is Here With The Schedule Of The Summit

September 27th, 2012 — 12:29pm

Another release for OpenStack today, the sixth in a little over two years.  Folsom, or 2012.2 has two new services Networking (Quantum) and Block Storage (Cinder) services, architected in line with the OpenStack philosophy of pluggability and extensibility. While work was underway to establish the new OpenStack Foundation, our thriving community once again delivered the release on-time and with all planned essential features.

The most impressive feature for me is the amount of people and companies that contributed to it: over 330 people from almost 50 companies. Not only the quantity of people involved in OpenStack Folsom has increased compared to the previous release Essex, but also the diversity of the echosystem increased. The study contributed by Bitergia shows how the ecosystem evolved between the two releases, increasing in size and diversity.

It’s time for yet another celebration before we head up to San Diego for the OpenStack Summit where we’ll start planning the next six months and Grizzly. The schedule for the Summit has been published: take advantage of the discount until the end of September (save $200) on the registration fee and come meet this amazing OpenStack community live in San Diego.

Comment » | Communication, community

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