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Countdown to the May 2014 OpenStack Summit

The May 2014 OpenStack Summit in Atlanta Kicks Off in 3 Days!

Continue to check OpenStack.org/Summit for updated information.

Summit Schedule
The main conference will run Monday through Thursday, and the Design Summit (developer working sessions) will run Tuesday through Friday. Arrive early on Monday to make sure you don’t miss any of the keynote action!

Registration Check-In Information

Skip the lines & pick up your badge early – registration begins on Sunday, May 11th at 3pm on Level 4 of the Georgia World Congress Center. Registration check-in will also be available throughout the week during the following times:

  • Sunday, May 11, 3pm – 7pm
  • Monday, May 12, 7am – 8pm
  • Tuesday, May 13, 7am – 6:30pm
  • Wednesday, May 14,  7:15am – 6pm
Not yet Registered? It’s not too Late!
  • Online Registration is now CLOSED but you can still register to attend the Summit onsite in Atlanta during the above listed registration hours.
New Summit Mobile App!
Plan ahead & streamline your Summit experience by downloading the official mobile app! Within the app, you can:
  • View the main conference & design summit schedules
  • Navigate maps of the GWCC, including breakout sessions and the expo hall
  • Chat with other Summit attendees
  • Participate in our expo hall booth crawl gamification & more!
  • Apple users download here & Android users download here
Local Train Transportation from Airport (MARTA)
MARTA’s airport station is attached to the airport, right off baggage claim. One-way fares are only $2.50 and within 20 minutes, you can be downtown.

  • Arriving passengers should follow the Ground Transportation signs to MARTA. The entrance to MARTA’s Airport Station is located inside the western end of the airport’s main terminal. Faregates are just a few feet from the baggage claim areas, just follow the signs.
  • To travel to the Omni Hotel and the GWCC: Take the train north to the Five Points Station. Take a westbound train 1 stop to CNN/GWCC Station. Take the escalator or elevator up and walk through the CNN building to hotel entrance.
  • To travel to the Westin: Take the train north to the Peachtree Center Station. Follow the signs to the Harris Street exit. Once exiting the fare gate, follow the signs pointing to Peachtree Street West. This exit will put you on the same side of the street as the hotel.
  • To travel to the Hyatt: Take the train north to the Peachtree Center Station. Follow the signs to the Harris Street exit. After exiting the fare gate, follow the signs to the Peachtree Street East. At street level, turn right to walk along Peachtree Street and walk a block to reach the Hyatt.
Summit Venue & Walking Directions
The Summit will take place at the GWCC. You can find a helpful map to navigate the venue here.
  • It is a short walking distance from the Omni, Westin and Hyatt hotels in downtown Atlanta.
  • From the Omni: Head southeast on Marietta St and turn right on Andrew Young International Blvd. The GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 5 minutes)
  • From the Westin: Head west on Andrew Young International Blvd. Walk half a mile and the GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 10 minutes)
  • From the Hyatt: Head south on Peachtree St and turn right on Andrew Young International Blvd. Walk half a mile and the GWCC will be on your right (Estimated walking time: 15 minutes)
Play to Win in the New OpenStack Booth Crawl QR Code Challenge!
New this year, we are hosting a challenge during the Booth Crawl Happy Hour on Monday, May 12. The grand prize winner will receive a Full Access Pass to the next OpenStack Summit in Paris (Nov 3-8, 2014) and a complimentary hotel room in Paris for 4 nights during the Summit.

OpenStack Photo Booth
Come capture your OpenStack Summit moment at our new photo booth in the hallway on Level 2. Write a message, snap a photo, take a piece of the Summit, share it with your Twitter and Facebook communities and print a copy to display in the OpenStack Marketplace Expo Hall.

Blogger Lounge
Are You a Blogger?  New this year we’ve created a Blogger Lounge – a quiet space for bloggers and media to write and share posts covering the Summit.  Look for it on Level 2 (Room B208).

Evening Events
Round out your Summit Experience & Have Fun at the Official Evening Events!
Stay Connected
Follow @OpenStack on Twitter for more updates, and join the conversation by using #OpenStack

 

OpenStack Summit Code of Conduct
The OpenStack Foundation is dedicated to providing an inclusive and safe Summit experience for everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, nationality or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of Summit participants in any form.  Summit exhibitors in the expo hall, evening party hosts and organizers of related Summit activities should be aware they are also subject to the code of conduct. Please make sure you review the Code of Conduct, which provides contact information for Foundation staff should you have any questions or need to report an issue.

Announcing the O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide

Er, what’s this? An O’Reilly OpenStack Operations Guide offered side-by-side with the continuously-published OpenStack Operations Guide? Yes, your eyes do not deceive you, O’Reilly has completed the production of the OpenStack Operations Guide: Set Up and Manage Your OpenStack Cloud. You can get your bits-n-bytes copy at http://docs.openstack.org/ops/ or order a dead-tree version on the O’Reilly site.

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This book was a complete community effort with a bit of a twist: we held a five-day book sprint back in February 2013 with the seven original authors and one book sprint facilitator, Adam Hyde. We wrote and wrote and wrote some more, then edited and glued it all together so that we had a 240 page book by Friday afternoon. The book got quite a bit of love and attention for the next year or so, and in February 2014 we held a mini-sprint with the original authors to update the book for the Havana release and to address developmental edits from our O’Reilly editors, led by Brian Anderson and first introduced by Andy Oram. In the developmental edit, we added a new architecture with RedHat using OpenStack Networking (neutron) as an alternative to Ubuntu with legacy networking, nova-network. We tested a process for upgrading from Grizzly to Havana in a new upgrades chapter. We also added a lot of network troubleshooting information. There’s a new “Havana Haunted by the Dead” tale from the crypt/cloud. We included an expanded glossary as well. Also an exciting addition to a book nerd like myself is the index.

As mentioned in the book itself, we appreciate the 50-plus contributors who support this book and the tool chains around it. Reviews, continuous builds, output, and translations are all an important part of this book’s surrounding systems.

The following people are contributors in the many methods it takes to create a book in the community: Akihiro Motoki, Alejandro Avella, Alexandra Settle, Andreas Jaeger, Andy McCallum, Benjamin Stassart, Beth Cohen, Chandan Kumar, Chris Ricker, David Cramer, David Wittman, Denny Zhang, Emilien Macchi, Gauvain Pocentek, Ignacio Barrio, James E. Blair, Jay Clark, Jeff White, Jeremy Stanley, K Jonathan Harker, KATO Tomoyuki, Lana Brindley, Laura Alves, Lee Li, Lukasz Jernas, Mario B. Codeniera, Matthew Kassawara, Michael Still, Monty Taylor, Nermina Miller, Nigel Williams, Phil Hopkins, Russell Bryant, Sahid Orentino Ferdjaoui, Sandy Walsh, Sascha Peilicke, Sean M. Collins, Sergey Lukjanov, Shilla Saebi, Stephen Gordon, Steven Deaton, Summer Long, Uwe Stuehler, Vaibhav Bhatkar, Veronica Musso, Ying Chun “Daisy” Guo, Zhengguang Ou, and ZhiQiang Fan.

We want to be sure you read this book and log bugs and perhaps even fix some yourself if you’re so inclined! You can read how to on the OpenStack wiki. We also have the OpenStack Security Guide, written in a five day book sprint in June 2013. And we won’t stop there! Plans are underway for a third book to be written with a five day book sprint to help people design OpenStack clouds for many use cases.

We’ll continue to update these books using our community tool chain. We greatly appreciate the support from the OpenStack Foundation and O’Reilly to give the OpenStack Operations Guide that professional polish it deserves.

OpenStack 2014 T-Shirt Design Winner

The 2014 T-shirt design contest is a wrap! Thank you to everyone who shared their creativity and original designs with us this year.
We are excited to reveal our winner, Jaewin Ong of Singapore! This colorful design will debut on T-Shirts at PyCon in Montreal this week, and will be distributed at upcoming events worldwide.
OpenStack T-Shirt Design
We wanted to learn more about the creative mind behind the design, so we asked Jaewin a few questions:
What was your inspiration for this design?
  • The inspiration was actually the OpenStack logo! Since the logo is already of significance, I thought it would be cool to manipulate it with bright colors and superimposing the outline with itself.
 How long have you been designing?
  • My first design was for a T-Shirt, incidentally, during my freshman year in university. The T-Shirts were printed and sold to raise funds for a committee I was involved in. And I started out with MS Paint! I’ve come a long way.
 Where are you currently working?
  • I’m currently a junior in university pursuing a degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
 In what way are you involved in OpenStack?
  • I’m afraid to say that my involvement with OpenStack is minimal. Although, I had some experience with Python during my internship. Otherwise, I do find cloud computing to be rather complex and I admire people who do it.
 Do you publish any of your other work online?
  • I don’t publish my work because I’m doing this out of interest. I would be grateful when it comes to a point where I’m publishing my work for other purposes besides interest.
 Is there anything else you might like to share about yourself?
  • I constantly look for opportunities like this to improve myself. It might not be a big deal to some, but it’s a big deal to me!
Congratulations, Jaewin!
Want to see your design on a future OpenStack T-Shirt? Stay tuned on our blog as we announce upcoming design contests!

 

OpenStack Day Events April – May – June 2014

Several upcoming OpenStack Day events are taking place around the world. Please join us in spreading the word and register soon. We hope to see you there!
OpenStack Day Mexico in Mexico City – April 29
  • When: Tuesday, April 29, 2014
  • Where: World Trade Center Mexico
  • Tickets: Tickets are MXN $200.00, covering all meals, workshops and conferences. Register quickly! 
OpenStack CEE Day in Budapest – May 26
OpenStack in Action 5! in Paris – May 28
  • Attendees will be provided with the raw materials to engage with the community, become a consumer of the technology and take part in its evolution
  • When: Wednesday, May 28, 2014
  • Where: CAP 15
  • Admission is free, so register to get an overview of the OpenStack technology, projects updates, challenges, best practices and roadmap for all audiences
#1 OpenStack Day in Milan – May 30
  • When: Friday, May 30, 2014
  • Where: Via Privata Stefanardo de Vimercate
OpenStack Israel in Tel Aviv-Yafo - June 2
Hear about OpenStack’s Icehouse Release from industry thought leaders and local OpenStack users. Following the conference, attend a 3-day training course on the current OpenStack Havana Release
  • When: Monday, June 2, 2014
  • Where: Arts Hall HaBama Herzliya
  • Tickets: We’re expecting +300 OpenStack users, prospective users, ecosystem members and developers to attend, so register quickly!
With an anticipated 500+ attendees from all sectors of London’s wide and diverse tech community, an exciting line-up of speakers and exhibitors, this will be the UK’s largest OpenStack related event this year!
  • When: Wednesday, June 4, 2014
  • Where: 155 Bishopsgate
  • Tickets: The early bird rate expires on May 14th, so register quickly before prices increase!
If you are interested in organizing an OpenStack Day event in your area, please contact [email protected]

 

OpenStack Summit – now with more Ops

I’m excited about what the upcoming Atlanta OpenStack Summit is going to bring, especially for those of us running clouds.

Once again, we’ve got an Operations track in the main conference. It’s bigger than ever, running Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday — and, the sessions were selected by individuals with some serious ops credentials (as opposed to say, our vendor friends).  “Training your cluster to take care of itself and let you eat dinner in peace“, “because AD != LDAP“, and “Cinder on Ceph War Stories” are some of the sessions I’m looking forward to.

Throughout the week, there’s also specific presentations on Security, Compute, Networking and Storage, but today we’re excited to highlight a brand new section: the Ops Meetup.

People who run clouds need to have a place to congregate at the Summit and swap best practices, architectures, ideas and give feedback – this is the Ops Meetup. Essentially, all of the sessions are designed to be full-room discussions: there will be no presenters and salient notes will be collaboratively recorded on Etherpads, just like in the Design Summit.

So, if you’re running a cloud and you want to actively engage in serious and not-so-serious discussion with like-minded folks, register for the summit, then turn up Monday and Friday to room B308 in Atlanta! You might even make OpenStack better in the process.

You can find the current schedule below. Further details can be found on the planning etherpad, and you are welcome to participation in the discussion on the openstack-operators mailing list.

Until then, may your MTUs match, expired tokens be few, and your message queues be clean. See you at the Summit!

Monday
1115 – 1155   Ask the devs: Meet the PTLs and TC, How to get the best out of the design summit
1205 – 1245  Reasonable Defaults

1400 – 1440  Upgrades and Deployment Approaches
1450 – 1530  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails
1540 – 1620  Architecture Show and Tell, Tales and Fails

1640 – 1720 Networking

1730 – 1810  Security

Friday
9:00 – 9:40   Enterprise Gaps
9:50 – 10:30  Database

10:50 – 11:30 Issues at Scale
11:40 – 12:20 Meta Discussion – ops communication and governance

1:20 – 2:00 Ansible
2:10 – 2:50 Chef
3:00 – 3:40 Puppet

4:00 – 4:40 Monitoring and Logging

Participate in the OpenStack User Survey by April 11!

We’re kicking off the third round of the OpenStack User Survey this month! You may remember before last November’s Summit in Hong Kong, we helped the User Committee run a survey to aggregate OpenStack deployments and share the results.

Hong Kong Survey Results

The survey received nearly twice as many answers as the previous round (822 compared to 414) and 387 deployments compared to 187.

The first User Survey in Spring 2013 provided great insight to the types of deployments and technology decisions made by the OpenStack community. We were able to catalogue 230 unique deployments – you can see the results presented by the User Committee at the last Spring Summit. Another huge benefit was the ability to uncover new users willing to talk about their OpenStack deployments, which can be found here: http://www.openstack.org/user-stories.

If you are an OpenStack user or have customers with OpenStack deployments, please take a few minutes to respond to our User Survey and pass it along to your network. The goals of the survey are to better define the OpenStack user community and requirements, facilitate engagement and communication among the user community, and uncover new use cases or OpenStack users who might be willing to tell their stories publicly.

Below you’ll find a link and instructions to complete the User Survey by April 11, 2014 at 23:00 UTC. If you already completed the survey last year, there’s no need to start from scratch. You simply need to log back in to update your Deployment Profile, as well as take the opportunity to provide any additional input.

http://www.openstack.org/user-survey

All the information provided is confidential and will only be presented in aggregate unless the user consents to making it public. Aggregate responses will be shared with the OpenStack Board, Technical Committee and community at large to help shape the roadmap and share useful information regarding operational decisions.

You can also help us by promoting the survey so we can secure as much participation as possible, for example by retweeting the OpenStack handle: @OpenStack

Remember, you can hear directly from users and see the aggregate survey findings by attending the next OpenStack Summit, May 12-16, in Atlanta.

Thank you for your support!

 

OpenStack Summit May 2014 Schedule & Registration Deadlines

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The official Summit agenda is now live: http://openstacksummitmay2014atlanta.sched.org

Adjustments, edits, additions to the schedule may be made between now and the Summit.  Continue to visit the site for updates.

Upcoming deadline reminders:

March 28* is the last day to save 50% off the full price and register for the Summit at the discounted Early Bird rate. Don’t miss out – prices will increase on March 29.

Register here: https://openstacksummitmay2014.eventbrite.co.uk

March 31* is the deadline to sign contracts to sponsor the Summit. We still have a few Event and Startup sponsorship levels available. Contact [email protected] if you are interested.

April 14* is the deadline to redeem all sponsor and speaker registration codes. If you are a sponsor or a confirmed speaker – please check your email inbox or junk folder for the code. When registering on Eventbrite you will need to enter your code before you select the ticket.

* The time for each deadline listed above is 11:55pm CST.

Please contact [email protected] with any Summit related questions.

OpenStack Atlanta Summit Presentation Voting

Wednesday evening we launched the online tool that allows you to rate the presentation proposals summited for the OpenStack Summit coming up May 12-16 in Atlanta.

This is our second year with online voting for summit presentations, and we wanted to let you know about a bug we’ve just corrected that you might have experienced during the first two days of voting. Alert community members discovered that in some cases, older presentations from our prior summit could be displayed once a vote was cast. (The system randomly selects the next presentation to display, and in this particular case it was not limiting the results to only the upcoming summit.) That’s now been corrected and we apologize for the bug that caused it.

Ultimately, the chairs for each track make the final presentation selections, using the ratings gathered from the community as input. To allow a bit more time for you to cast your votes, we’ve extended the voting deadline until midnight central, March 3rd.

If you are a presenter or voter with any questions or feedback, please let us know: [email protected]

New Foundation Gold Members & Sponsors

The OpenStack Foundation is thrilled to have new additions to our ecosystem. Three new Gold Members and 18 Corporate Sponsors have recently joined the incredible list of companies who are supporting the Foundation and driving innovation on the platform.  AptiraHuawei and Hitachi won the OpenStack Board’s approval at the November board meeting and joined the Foundation as Gold members, which requires a strong, strategic commitment to the technology and community.

We’ve also seen amazing support in Corporate Sponsorship and we want to share the impressive list of recent additions.

The diversity in technologies and geographic location of these new additions to the ecosystem reflects the growth of OpenStack and its footprint worldwide.  We are looking forward to enjoying each these companies’ unique contributions going forward!

OpenStack Commitment to Interoperability

OpenStack began with the mission to produce a ubiquitous open source cloud computing platform. A key component of that mission is building not only software, but a large OpenStack ecosystem that would support its growth and add value to the core technology platform. In carrying out that mission, the Foundation has been taking key steps to define the core technology platform and advance OpenStack interoperability.

The TL;DR summary:  Now that we have tons of users, we need to make sure all (downstream) products labeled “OpenStack” have a certain set of core capabilities, and we need to verify those with automated tests just like we do upstream.  End-users should be our focus, and ensuring they get what they want and expect out of the platform once it’s running as a service is paramount.  The goal is to define the first set of tests in time for the May 2014 Summit in Atlanta. If this matters to you, get involved!

Read on to learn more about the rationale, history, future plans, and how you can get involved.

Why does interoperability matter for OpenStack?

We’ve heard from many users and operators that interoperability between OpenStack clouds and hybrid cloud scenarios are an important part of the value they are seeking. OpenStack is most useful when it provides a common platform to consistently deploy workloads between clouds without making resource intensive changes to operations tools and processes. Value is unlocked when development tools and applications have a common target across public and private OpenStack clouds.

The full potential of OpenStack will not be realized if users don’t know what they’re going to get from public cloud services or off-the-shelf distributions and appliances. Ambiguity or mistrust about the capabilities of OpenStack isn’t good for the business ecosystem or end users. It’s important that public clouds and private cloud products branded with OpenStack have a clear meaning in the market.

What is the Foundation doing?

One of the most important responsibilities we have as a Foundation is to ensure the long-term value of the OpenStack brand in the market. This has been an ongoing priority since our founding and has involved the collective effort of a great number of community members.

When we began, we implemented an OpenStack trademark policy, which allows broad use of the OpenStack logo and name for non-commercial community building efforts like user group meetups, while also creating special guidelines, technical requirements, and licenses for use by commercial products. As the community, the software, and the ecosystem have grown, so too has the need to refine these technical requirements for commercial products, by defining a core set of capabilities included in all products and services marketed as “OpenStack.”

It is indeed a large task, one that stems from the diversity of our community, the breadth of our ecosystem, and the broad application of our software. But it is one that will ensure the longevity, vitality and utility of OpenStack far into the future.

Therefore, in order to agree on a set of well-defined criteria for the core we must take special care to have a transparent and objective process. The Board of Directors and the Technical Committee have initiated a number of programs to tackle the issue.

IncUp (Early 2013)

The first step was forming the Incubation/Future of the Core (IncUp) committee, a joint effort between the OpenStack Board of Directors and Technical Committee, aimed at tackling the process for expanding the scope of OpenStack through new project incubation and promotion.

At the April 2013 board meeting, the Board of Directors approved the IncUp committee’s recommendations, including 1) The technical committee continues to manage the incubation process for new projects applying to be part of the coordinated, integrated release 2) Projects that are part of the coordinated release should be referred to as “Integrated” (but not necessarily “Core”), and 3) “Core” is a label the Board can attach to a project that is part of the regular integrated release.

The Technical Committee is following on these efforts by creating a clear set of guidelines for projects that wish to be officially incubated, as well as the attributes an incubated project should have before being approved for graduation to the integrated release. The purpose of the guidelines are to maintain a high standard of quality and cross-project integration for OpenStack.

The important outcome of the IncUp committee places the responsibility to manage the technical scope of the OpenStack project with the Technical Committee, while the Board ultimately sets the criteria for which technical capabilities should be present in (downstream) commercial products or services marketed as OpenStack. This led to the next phase in the process: considering how to define those criteria in a standard and broadly applicable manner.

Enter the “Spider” (2013)

The Board of Directors formed a new work group to tackle the task of determining how to define Core in a consistent manner that would apply to the varied set of use cases OpenStack addresses and the broad set of technology developed within the community. Early in this effort, the team, including Alan Clark and Rob Hirschfeld, drew a map on a whiteboard of dependencies and relationships that came into play when trying to define which projects were “Core OpenStack.” The drawing, which revealed some of the complexities of the task, resembled a spider mind map and inspired the nickname for the group.

Rather than jump straight into choosing specific projects that would qualify for the “Core” label, the committee focused on defining principles that would apply equally to any commonly required and deployed component of OpenStack deployments. These principles were drafted and reviewed through the summer and fall of 2013 at a series of open community meetings held online and in various locations. After several revisions, the Board of Directors approved the final principles at their November 2013 meeting.

DefCore (Ongoing)

After approving the guiding principles at the Hong Kong Summit in November 2013, the OpenStack Board of Directors created the DefCore committee, chaired by Rob Hirschfeld and Josh McKenty, to define a “core” set of capabilities which are expected to be present in all commercial products marketed as “OpenStack”, along with a set of tests to validate those capabilities.

The creation of DefCore marks a new focus on including a test-driven component to the definition of core. This route is more objective, and test-based standards better addresses our commitment to interoperability. The committee is working to determine which capabilities a commercial offering should include to make use of the OpenStack marks and is currently in the process of standardizing the tests that must be passed. The goal is to repurpose the same testing that we’ve been doing on the upstream code to apply to the products and services downstream, ensuring that they retain the fundamental building blocks of Openstack.

One of the realizations coming out of the early work of the committee was that users think in terms of “capabilities” more than “projects.”  Projects are how we organize as a development community, but in the end the capabilities delivered by an openstack-powered cloud are what really matter, and in practice many capabilities rely on multiple underlying “projects”.  This is a subtle but important distinction which is reflected in the way we think about writing tests to validate those capabilities in the downstream products licensing the OpenStack brand.

The DefCore committee is working against an aggressive timeline with a plan to the pilot must-pass tests for Havana before the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta in May. Icehouse will follow shortly thereafter, and Juno’s test will be ready to go by the Paris summit.

Being able to expose OpenStack cloud test results and provide a defined target for end users is an incredibly important effort and high priority for the Foundation this year. It is our hope that by outlining the steps we’re taking, the community will involve themselves in these efforts and track the progress of this vital endeavor. To get involved in the DefCore process, sign up for the mailing list and follow the wiki for updates.

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