Vancouver, BC
May 21-24, 2018

Event Details


Storage for Data Platforms

Data volume is growing at an unprecedented rate, often without consummate growth in computation needs. The world that lead to the emergence of the tenets laid out in the GFS and Map Reduce papers has seen a dramatic transformation, with over a decade of hardware improvements. Disaggregation of compute and storage is now commonplace, championed by organizations like Netflix, Amazon, and Airbnb. Pushing storage down a layer and treating it as an infrastructure service allows data platform teams to focus on increasing the pace of innovation higher up the stack.

Engineers building data platforms on OpenStack clouds expect a varity of storage services. Object storage is increasingly becoming the centerpiece of data platforms, as it enables in-situ analysis from elastic workload clusters, low cost, and massive scalability. The presentation will detail object storage centric data platform architectures, and how to build rock solid storage services suitable for data intensive applications.


What can I expect to learn?

Learn

  • How data platform architectures use object storage to provide nimbler, more elastic workload clusters.
  • The anatomy of a object storage service geared to cater to data intensive applications.
  • What hardware leads is needed for instances desired by data platform engineers.
  • How to configure and use Cinder volume types to provide additional capacity when necessary.

 

 

 

Monday, May 21, 5:20pm-5:30pm
Level: Intermediate
Red Hat, Inc
Kyle Bader is a Senior Solution Architect working in the Storage Solutions Team at Red Hat, lending his design and operational skills with Ceph to help develop tested solutions that ensure repeatable success when deploying distributed, fault-tolerent, multi-petabyte storage systems. Prior to Red Hat, Kyle had architectural roles at both Inktank and DreamHost. Kyle was part of the team that... FULL PROFILE
Red Hat
The Ceph Storage PM at Red Hat, formerly the Ubuntu Server PM at Canonical, and the Linux "Systems Management Czar" at SUSE. FULL PROFILE