The OpenStack Blog

PTL Webinars: Icehouse to Juno

It is time again for our PTL post-Summit webinar series. Come listen to the latest project updates from Icehouse to Juno. Each webinar includes 45 minutes of updates with 15 minutes of q&a.

These webinars were established to reduce the number of conflicts during the Summit and allow for broader participation. Our goal is to host a few webinars like this a week through early July. Please join us or listen to the replays on the OpenStack Foundation’s YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/OpenStackFoundation.

Completed Webinars
Tuesday, June 17, 2014
12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
Anne Gentle (Docs)
Dolph Mathews (Identity)
Mark Washenberger (Image Service)
View the Slides
Replay

Tuesday, June 24, 2014
7 a.m. PT/10 a.m. ET
Eoghan Glynn (Telemetry)
John Griffith (Block Storage)
View the Slides
Replay

12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
John Dickinson (Object Storage)
Robert Collins (Provisioning)
View the Slides
Replay

Thursday, June 26, 2014
7 a.m. PT/10 a.m. ET
Sergey Lukjanov (Data Processing)
Doug Hellmann (Common Libraries)
Thierry Carrez (Release Management)
View the Slides
Replay

12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
David Lyle (Dashboard)
Kyle Mestery (Networking)
View the Slides
Replay

4pm PT / 7pm ET
Michael Still (Compute)
View the Slides
Replay

Tuesday, 7/1/2014
12 pm PT/3 p.m. ET
Nikhil Manchanda (Database as a Service)
Zane Bitter (Orchestration)
View the Slides
Replay

If you have any questions on these events, please contact margie@openstack.org or allison@openstack.org.

Category: Uncategorized

Open Mic Spotlight: Ryan Hsu

RyanHsuThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Ryan is a longtime resident of Orange County who recently moved to Silicon Valley to work on Openstack at VMware. He has been mainly focused on testing and infra in Openstack (such as the VMware Minesweeper) but has squeezed in some small contributions in Nova and Horizon as well. Follow him on Twitter @serveshrimp

1. Finish the sentences. OpenStack is great for _______. OpenStack is bad for ______.

Openstack is great for choice. Openstack is bad for nobody. The great thing about OpenStack is that people have total control in selecting the best of breed components to build their cloud. Nobody ever got a nosebleed for choosing Openstack.

2. Get creative — create an original OpenStack gif or haiku! 

Submit awesome patch
Instantly get minus one
Shout curse at the screen

3. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

My first bout into coding was in the 6th grade when my friends and I would create horrible websites on Geocities. And when we got bored in math class, we would create tiny games in TI-BASIC on our calculators. It wasn’t until college, though, when I actually started coding useful things.

4. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

Anywhere that has little noise and visual distraction, preferably with a dog nearby. Currently the best place is home.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

OpenStack is extremely dynamic unlike any other projects I’ve worked on in the past. The sheer number of people working on the project, diversity of contributors, and level of enthusiasm never ceases to amaze me. Also, Python!

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Technical Committee Update

The OpenStack Technical Committee (TC) meets weekly. During the meeting on 2014-06-03, one of the topics we discussed was the relatively low turnout for the TC election as compared to the PTL elections. The most productive thing to come out of that discussion was that we needed to do a better job of communicating what the TC is working on and why it is important. As a result, we will be posting regular updates about the TC to the OpenStack blog. This first post will likely be a bit longer as it’s important to set up some of the context for the things we are currently discussing.

How the TC was formed is described in the history of OpenStack open source project governance  by the current chair of the TC, Thierry Carrez.

Openness

Open governance is an important value held by OpenStack and the TC wants to be as open as possible. In addition to these regular updates, you can find the details of everything we do in a few other places. The archives of the openstack-tc mailing list are open. Our weekly IRC meetings are public and logged.

All project governance work is managed in a git repository and changes are reviewed in gerrit in the same way that we review code. Everyone that is interested is invited to comment on proposed governance changes. You can find a list of changes under review here. You can find a list of previously approved changes and the discussions that happened on their reviews here.

Project Incubation and Graduation Requirements

One of the responsibilities of the TC is to manage the set of projects that are included in the OpenStack integrated release. New projects may apply to be incubated. Incubated projects will later be reviewed for graduation from incubation. A graduated project is a part of the integrated release.

As OpenStack has grown, it became clear that we needed to be much more clear around our expectations of projects for incubation and graduation. Over the last year we worked to formalize these expectations in a document in the governance repository. We approved the first version of this document on December 2, 2013. We have been updating it ever since as more issues need to be clarified. You can find the latest version of that document in the Governance git repository.

Toward the end of the Icehouse development cycle, we started a process of going through all projects already in the integrated release and evaluating them against this criteria. For any project that has gaps against these expectations, we require that the PTL present a plan for addressing these gaps during the Juno cycle.

Glance

The latest project review was for Glance, during the TC meeting on 2014-06-10. The only gap found for Glance was around tempest test coverage. Specifically, Tempest does not cover uploading a real binary image to Glance. The Glance PTL will now come up with a plan to address this gap and the TC will review progress against this plan throughout the Juno cycle.

We actually spent quite a bit of this meeting talking about Glance. The most controversial topic is around the proposal to increase its scope. Glance is currently focused on disk images. There is a proposal against the governance repository to expand its scope to cover a more general definition of artifacts. The particular use cases that inspired this direction for Glance is the desire to store things like Heat or Murano templates. In the end, there seems to be broad support for the general direction proposed. We still have some work to do to get the wording of the mission statement in a form that everyone is comfortable with.

Finally, the Glance project brought an important cross-project API consistency question to the TC. Specifically, they have an alternative method for how they would like to expose actions through their API which is different from how Nova does it currently, for example. There was support for the specific proposal. However, it raises the larger question about how we go about best working toward cross project API consistency. We would love to have someone lead an effort to create a cross-project API style guide for OpenStack, but it’s unclear who will do it and exactly who would review and approve the content. I expect this to be an ongoing discussion.

You can find the full mailing list thread that spawned this API discussion in the archives starting in May and continuing in June.

Designate

Another project that has received a lot of attention recently is Designate, which provides DNS as a Service for OpenStack. This is a sorely needed feature for OpenStack deployments so I’m very happy to see the progress made in this area.

The project recently applied for incubation. This is actually the second time that Designate has applied for incubation. The first time was one year ago, in June of 2013. After the first application, the TC concluded that it was a bit too early to incubate the project. There were various concerns, but the primary one was the level of involvement in the project, in terms of individuals and separate companies.

Designate has matured a good bit over the last year and I’m proud to announce that the application has been approved. Designate is now an incubated project!

The earliest Designate will be included in the integrated release would be the K release. Given that we’re already well into the Juno cycle, the L release seems more realistic. This is a topic that the TC would revisit at the end of the Juno development cycle.

Future Updates

We want to make these updates from the TC as useful as possible. If you have any comments or suggestions, please let us know!

Category: Communication, community, Governance

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 30 – June 6)

An Ideal OpenStack Developer

In a long piece, Mark McLoughlin thinks about the velocity OpenStack achieved and how it has managed to attract an unusual number of contributors and, for such a complex project, made it relatively easy for tThe way I feel when upgrading my OpenStack cloudhem to contribute. He attempts to define The Prototypical OpenStack Developer. The ideal that we should aspire to. The standard that all contributors should be held to. And asks questions at the end.

Analysis of April 2014 TC election

Thierry Carrez found time to analyze the results of the recent 2014 election to renew 7 of the 13 Technical Commitee’s members. It seems we have ‘currents’ among voters, from the foodie party to the French one.

Understanding OpenStack Designated Code Sections – Three critical questions

After nearly a year of discussion, the OpenStack board launched the DefCore process with 10 principles that set us on path towards a validated interoperability standard.   We created the concept of “designated sections” to address concerns that using API tests to determine core would undermine commercial and community investment in a working, shared upstream implementation. Designated sections provide the “you must include this” part of the core definition.  Having common code as part of core is a central part of how DefCore is driving OpenStack operability.

State of Application Developer Experience with OpenStack

When Matt Farina first started writing applications that ran in OpenStack clouds or worked against the APIs the experience was painful. Things are improving but his post reminds us that we have plenty of opportunities to improve.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Flint Calvin David J Hu
Fathi Boudra Syd Logan
JunichiMatayoshi Ryan Oshima
Talusani Mani Shanker Flint Calvin
Kaleb Pomeroy Ellen Hui
Lorcan Browne Michael Johnson
Jorge Chai Eyal Edri
Bob Thyne
Paul Kehrer
Nirmal Thacker
Alex Frolov
Nikita Gerasimov
Benedikt Trefzer
pk
Steve Heyman
Ryan Moats
Nanuk Krinner
John Vrbanac

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

The way I feel when upgrading my OpenStack cloud

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Mark Vanderwiel

This post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. If you’re interested in being featured, please choose five questions from this form and submit!

Mark Vanderwiel has been with IBM Systems & Technology Group for 27+ years. He has worked on development of many projects, most recently with energy management and OpenStack. Currently he’s working on the OpenStack Chef cookbooks in StackForge as a core contributor.

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

I have been most active in the StackForge OpenStack Chef cookbooks. This set of cookbooks is fairly new and growing at a fast pace.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

I started with assembly on the 6502 (that’s old school Apple for you young guys), college with green terminals for nice pascal, then at IBM for 15 other languages. Now I focus on python and ruby for my Chef work.

3. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

In my office, looking out the window at the million dollar backup generator, life is good.

4. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

IRC #openstack-chef, #chef

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

The concept of handling cloud infrastructure with open source at first seemed like a wild idea. But after getting involved, it’s been a very interesting and encouraging experience. There are some great folks working on this.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 23 – 30)

MySQL Galera does *not* support SELECT … FOR UPDATE

It’s not as bad as it sounds but I think it’s worth mentioning here for two reasons: this conversation came as a result of putting developers and operators in the same room, again, in Atlanta. It proves that we’re on the right track to building cohesion among groups that have been perceived as separated (but never meant to be). The second reason is that on top of resolving real-life operational issues, this amazing OpenStack community finds ways to spark and quickly sedate an entertaing flame war on which SQL is better than yours. Worth reading the whole thread.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Past Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Security Notes and Advisories

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Marcelo Dieder Vern Hart
Kévin Bernard-Allies Sam Whyte
Rodrigo Duarte Pavel Kholkin
Kashyap Kopparam Manju Ramanathpura
Chris Dent Timothy R. Chavez
Andrey Pavlov Omri Gazitt
Martin Geisler Isabell Sippli
Benedikt Trefzer Alexey I. Froloff
Patrick Crews Mike May
Omri Gazitt John Schofield
chrisroberts Feodor Tersin
Nataliia Uvarova Ashwin Agate
Matthew Montgomery Michael Solberg
gdcabrera
Praveen Yalagandula
Feodor Tersin
Manuel Desbonnet

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

trying-to-fix-xml-api

Looking at the xml API implementation in nova

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (May 2 – 23)

Taking Stock of OpenStack’s Rapid Growth

With another successful OpenStack Summit in the books, Jonathan Bryce reflects on three big areas of maturity that are rapidly emerging for the project: user maturity, software maturity and a focus on cloud operations.

OpenStack Superuser

Superuser is a new online publication dedicated to the experiences of individuals who are running OpenStack clouds of all sizes, across all industries. The online publication lives at superuser.openstack.org.

How DefCore is going to change your world: three advisory cases

The first release of the DefCore Core Capabilities Matrix (DCCM) was revealed at the Atlanta summit. At the Summit, Joshua McKenty and Rob Hirschfeld had a session which examined what this means for the various members of the OpenStack community. A rather lengthy post reviews the same advisory material.

Community Office Hours

One of the requests in Atlanta was to setup carefully listening ears for developers and users alike so they can highlight roadblocks, vent frustration and hopefully also give kudos to people, suggest solutions, etc. The Community Managers have added two 1 hour slots to the OpenStack Meetings calendar

    • Tuesdays at 0800 UTC on #openstack-community (hosted by Tom)
    • Fridays at 1800 UTC on #openstack-community (hosted by Stefano)

so if you have anything you’d like the Foundation to be aware of please hop on the channel and talk to us. If you don’t/can’t use IRC, send us an email and we’ll use something else: just talk to us.

Reports from Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Other Events

Upcoming Events

Other News

Security Notes and Advisories

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Zhou Yu Tim Pownall
Thanassis Parathyras Victor HU
Chuck Carlino Craig Jellick
Paul Kehrer Chris Dent
kedar kulkarni Nastya Urlapova
Radoslaw Smigielski Gaudenz Steinlin
Masco Kaliyamoorthy Ravi Vagadia
Srinivasa Acharya Federico Lucifredi
Gary W. Smith Susaant Kondapaneni
John Brogan Lorcan Browne
Lukas Bezdicka Hideaki Suzuki
Adam Harwell Kevin
Nikolay Makhotkin Masco Kaliyamoorthy
Federico Lucifredi Ethan Lynn
Ethan Lynn Dave Tucker
Jun Wu gangadhar singh
Sudheendra Murthy Vishal Thapar
Vasudev Kamath Rashmi P
Mark Sturdevant Zhou Yu
Shashank Gupta Swami Reddy
Gabriel Assis Bezerra Rodrigo Duarte
Phillip Toohill
Erik Moe
Chuck Carlino
Tim Potter
Esparta
Adam Harwell
Xiandong Meng
Robert Parker
Gal Sagie
Mitsuhiro Tanino
Kevin Mentzer
Henrique Truta
Gary W. Smith
Slawomir Bochenski

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

When having to review a long list of trivial spelling correction patches

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Taking Stock of OpenStack’s Rapid Growth

With another successful OpenStack Summit in the books, I wanted to take a minute to reflect on three big areas of maturity that are rapidly emerging for the project: user maturity, software maturity and a focus on cloud operations.

Users Take Center Stage

First, it has become increasingly clear that the number of new users and the growth of existing ones marks a turning point for OpenStack. New users like Disney and Wells Fargo are stepping up to talk about how OpenStack figures into their agile infrastructure plans, advocating for the project and encouraging their vendors to come along for the ride.

ATT

At the same time, existing users like AT&T, Comcast and Bloomberg are expanding their footprints. Comcast’s is footprint now 5x larger than what they talked about in Portland just one year ago. Bloomberg is now in production. They’re all participating actively in the community, both as upstream contributors (Comcast was a top 20 contributor to the Icehouse release) and as operators.

On the other end of the spectrum, smaller organizations like Budd Van Lines, DigitalFilm Tree, BioIQ, and government agencies like the USDA have stepped onto the Summit stage to talk about their use of OpenStack and the workloads they’re running. Check out the playlist of user presentations on YouTube.

Users are important. Critical, in fact. To that point, some observers obsess over how many OpenStack users are visible. In 2012, they asked, “Where are the big companies?” Then, AT&T, Comcast and eBay raised their hands. Last year, they asked, “But, where are the enterprises?” Then, companies like Disney, Sony, Wells Fargo, Bloomberg and Fidelity raised their hands.

Now, the question they ask is, “But where are the companies of all sizes and industries, running OpenStack at scale, for all workloads, in production, with specifics and details?” And as more users start raising their hands, they’ll find something else to chirp about.

Where are the users? They were in Atlanta last week, and the people who were there saw them. The summit in Atlanta attracted more than 4,500 attendees from 55 countries:

  • Two of the top three entertainment companies were there and spoke about using OpenStack (Disney and Time Warner).
  • Five of the seven largest telcos were in Atlanta and the top three (AT&T, Verizon, and Comcast) talked about their deployments.
  • About a third of the Fortune 100 was represented in Atlanta, as users, devs, operators, vendors or participants.
  • 39% of commercial banks in the Fortune 500 were present in Atlanta, including the top three. Six of the top eight were present.
  • More than two dozen users spoke at the Summit, in keynotes, solo presentations, panels, and vendor sessions.

When we talk about users, it’s not just about trotting out a list of names. It’s about what these users are doing with the software. Some, like Wells Fargo, are just getting started. Others, like AT&T, are well along the learning curve. But the bottom line is that we’re interested in how they are using OpenStack to grow, compete and do new things. These users are leaders in our community, and they’re making their voices heard.

Superuser Art

We don’t just have users. We have advocates. They’re users, developers, operators and vendors. We have community members. They’re engaged. And they’re changing how IT is done.

A new tool we launched last week to share stories about how users are engaged and using OpenStack to transform their organizations is the Superuser publication. Superusers are not large companies or even large deployments, necessarily. Rather, they’re the individuals who are taking the lead in their organizations to stay competitive in an economy that moves more rapidly every day.

As we move toward the next Summit in Paris this fall, our community will continue to focus on what users care about: a community to continuously improve the software and share best operational practices, a publication to merchandise use cases, and a marketplace of products and services they can tap into when they’re ready.

Honing the Code in Response to the User

Even with all the momentum and engagement around users, there’s a factor driving OpenStack’s adoption that’s equal in value. It’s the focus that our community has embraced with regard to hardening the code and on operations excellence.

Sony user story

An obvious case in point here is OpenStack Networking (Neutron). Sony is an active user who made clear last week several specific steps that need to be taken to harden Neutron. They weren’t the only user/operator with specific points of improvement to include in the upcoming Juno release.  As a result, look at the roadmap. User and operator feedback is now in the plan.

It’s a trend in the works since Hong Kong, when the plans were laid for such user and operator-focused features as rolling upgrades in Compute and federated identity management via the Identity Service.

Cloud Operators Engage With the Community

In Atlanta, we held our first operator working sessions during the day and a half Ops Meetup. More than 200 people who run OpenStack clouds showed up to share best practices and improve the practice of operating clouds built on OpenStack. Dozens of these operators have volunteered to organize working groups within the community to keep the feedback loop throughout the next development cycle.

Ops Meetup PTLs Intro

This new level of engagement is key to improving the OpenStack experience. Operators understand what it takes to make a cloud perform and meet the service levels users expect. Operators see how users actually use the cloud, and they have a view of application performance that can help improve the infrastructure in ways that devs and end users might not intuitively grasp.

The Software-Defined Economy, Delivered by OpenStack

We are now living in the software-defined economy.

No matter what size your organization is, it must move faster. Supply chain and IP advantages are fleeting and costly; organizations are realizing that continuous software innovation is critical in terms of building and preserving competitive advantage.

Companies are trying to figure out how to leverage their developers to make this happen. OpenStack is the infrastructure platform more and more of these companies are choosing to give their developers the tools they need to bring agility to a completely new paradigm of software development.

Software supported by agile infrastructure makes rapid innovation a reality, and the OpenStack community is making agile infrastructure a reality for a growing number of companies.

And the stakes couldn’t be higher. According to an analysis by Richard Foster, on average, an S&P 500 company is now being replaced about once every two weeks, either because of market cap decline or acquisition. And the churn rate of companies has been accelerating over time.

Corporations in the S&P 500 in 1958 lasted in the index for 61 years, on average. By 1980, the average tenure had shrunk to about 25 years. Today, it stands at just 18 years based on seven year rolling averages.

At the current churn rate, 75% of the S&P 500 will be replaced by 2027.

All this is at the heart of why every company either is a technology company or is becoming one. Users of OpenStack are putting software at the center of their strategies to do just that.

Category: Uncategorized

Upcoming OpenStack Day Events in May & June!

Did you miss the Atlanta Summit? Did you attend the Summit and now have new stories to tell?

There are several OpenStack events taking place near you over the next few weeks. Come join us to share outcomes of the Juno Design Summit, hear about new use cases and have direct conversations with industry and technical leaders. Space is limited, so register soon!

CEE Day 2014 FB graphic
OpenStack CEE Day in Budapest
Franz Meyer will kick off OpenStack CEE Day with Monday’s keynote, followed by several breakout sessions and workshop tracks offering hands on labs from OpenStack experts.
When: Monday, May 26, 8:30am – 5pm
Where: Urania National Movie Theatre
Tickets: €50.00
Featured Speakers:
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Franz Meyer, Red Hat
  • Alan Kavanagh, Ericsson
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • AND more!

openstackinaction5

Attendees will be provided with an overview of the OpenStack technology, project updates, challenges, best practices and see how the roadmap is tailored for its different audiences. Admission is free!
When: Wednesday, May 28, 8:30am – 7pm
Where: CAP 15
Featured Speakers:
  • Raphaël Ferreira, eNovance
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Bryan Che, Red Hat
  • Mark McClain, Yahoo
  • Patrick Hamon, Dell
  • AND more!

OpenStack_Italy

A one-day event to share the latest trends, news, services, use cases regarding the main open cloud software community.The morning session is focused on the OpenStack latest news and case histories; the afternoon is dedicated to technical workshops and use cases.
When: Friday, May 30, 9am – 6pm
Where: Via Privata Stefanardo de Vimercate
Featured Speakers:
  • Mariano Cunietti, Enter
  • Chris Jackson, Rackspace
  • Giuseppe Capaldo, HP Italia
  • Michael Kienle, IT-Novum
  • Vincenzo di Somma, Canonical
  • Salvatore Orlando, VMware
  • AND more!

OpenStack Israel

OpenStack Israel in Tel Aviv-Yafo
Hear about OpenStack’s Icehouse Release from industry thought leaders and local OpenStack users. Following the conference, you can attend a 3-day training course on the current OpenStack Icehouse Release.
When: Monday, June 2, 8:30am – 5pm
Where: Arts Hall HaBama Herzliya
Featured Speakers:
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu
  • Jonathan Bryce, OpenStack Foundation
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • Thierry Carrez, OpenStack Foundation
  • Mark McLoughlin, Red Hat

OS Day - London

OpenStack UK Day in London
After keynotes from Canonical, SolidFire and vArmour, afternoon sessions will explore user case studies, industry best practices, and technical talks from OpenStack tech leads.
When: Wednesday, June 4, starting at 8:30am
Where: 155 Bishopsgate
Tickets: £50.00 + VAT when you use this discount code: OS14EB
Featured Speakers:

  • Mark Collier, OpenStack Foundation
  • Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu
  • Monty Taylor, HP
  • Mark McClain, Yahoo
  • Chris Jackson, Rackspace
  • Boris Devouge, HP
  • AND more!

If you have any questions, please contact events@openstack.org.

Category: community, Event, Uncategorized

Atlanta Summit, Day 4: New Skills, Bigger Goals

photo-4

In a room full of users, 4 trainers and and army of volunteers walked through, step by step, how to create, manage and delete an instance, as well as networking, user management, and how to use different storage services available in OpenStack.

“We want to get you playing around with Horizon. We aren’t making any assumptions. We want to start you from 0.”

Twenty minutes after the workshop began, the presenters asked, how many of you have an instance up and running? The entire room raised their hands and presenters applauded them.

Over the course of the ninety minute session, the trainers took the participants through exercises below to learn how to use the command line clients and the Horizon dashboard to set up identity, compute, creating containers, uploading and downloading objects, networking, block storage, image store.

photo-5

Getting Started with OpenStack

Two sessions on the fourth day of the summit provided a space for new users install OpenStack on their own, to spin up their own instances. In the session, “OpenStack from Zero to Nova: An Activity-Driven Workshop,” each participant was given their own self-contained all-in-one OpenStack cloud environment.

In another hands-on session, “Getting Started with OpenStack,” participants walked through each of the OpenStack components and were given suggestions and resources for learning OpenStack. In the session, participants set up a multi-node OpenStack cloud, on their laptops.

You Sir, Sir Vey

One of the most anticipated sessions of each summit is the discussion around the user survey results.

Reactions to the user survey:

@cote Looking through recent OpenStack user survey (http://slidesha.re/1mvlNv6 ). It’d be awesome to see this level of detail for other cloud platforms

@dmavrakis Telecoms accounts for 6% of OpenStack installations slideshare.net/ryan-lane/open… Perhaps sample was IT biased though.

@drzeydy My favorite part of #OpenStackSummit: OpenStack Atlanta User Survey

Don’t Miss

OpenStack Summit Keynote & Session Video Footage: Video content through has been uploaded to the OpenStack YouTube channel. Check out the footage here.

From Around The Web

How OpenStack Is Aiming to Win the Enterprise
VIDEO: Allan Clark, chairman of the board at the OpenStack Foundation, discusses new initiatives from the open-source cloud platform.

How to Use OpenStack in Your Small Business
The OpenStack cloud platform works well for companies that aim to deploy software or infrastructure as a service but remain wary of doing so using using public cloud services.

Embracing the user at OpenStack Summit Atlanta
There’s something different about OpenStack Summit Atlanta. Maybe it’s the attendance, the new arrivals, the latest projects, the announcements, the talks, or the community coming together.

Category: Event, Summit, Uncategorized

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