The OpenStack Blog

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 14 – 28)

Why you should be reviewing more OpenStack code

Icehouse 3 is upon us, and as someone that is on a bunch of core review teams, it means a steady drum beat of everyone asking how do they get core reviewers to review their code. Sean Dague explains quite well why you should be doing code reviews.

Trusted Cloud computing with Intel TXT: The challenge

In today’s connected environments, attacks on compute infrastructure are ubiquitous. Major players have been compromised by hackers and malware, with damages inflicted both to their reputation and their business. Protecting the infrastructure from external and internal threats is an important part of operating production grade cloud environments. Christian Huebner introduces how OpenStack integrates with TXT.

Our Cloud in Havana

Upgrading a nearly 50,000 core cloud from Grizzly to Havana can be done with a series of steps, each of which can have short periods of reduced functionality but with constant VM availability. Tim Bell tells us how CERN upgraded its OpenStack cloud.

Status of the OpenStack port to Python 3

Python 3 has been around for about 5 years, and we have excellent reasons to make sure OpenStack runs well on it. Unfortunately, this is not the case. In his article, Cyril Roelandt explains what works, what doesn’t, and what you can do to help.

OpenStack selected as mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014

OpenStack has been selected to be a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014. Thanks to the hard work of many contributors we could join GSoC for the first time.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Waiting for zuul to get my review checked

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Derek Higgins

derekh_headshotThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Derek works on OpenStack for Red Hat from his home in the west of Ireland. These days, you’ll find him working on TripleO mainly
contributing to the TripleO CI set-up. When he is not busy keeping his 3 year old and 10 month old out of trouble, Derek volunteers for an ambulance service as a qualified EMT.

When approaching a problem Derek usually jumps in feet first with his eyes closed, and when he finds himself tangled up in the weeds he’ll get out and jump in again somewhere else.

You can follow him on Twitter at @bethehokie.

1. What new OpenStack projects do you think will have a significant impact on the cloud market in the next year?

The one I’m working on of course, a reference deployment of OpenStack, is something that we’ve been missing in the community up until now. TripleO is putting a lot of effort into getting that right. Up until now, operators have been left to their own devices when it comes to deciding how they will deploy OpenStack, but having the option of picking a solution that is fully integrated with the upstream development process will make their choice a lot easier.

2. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you lear in college? On-the-job?

On my first day in college a lecturer walked in and asked people who knew what a programming language was to put their hands up. I was one of the people with both hands by my side. I quickly learned pascal and x86 assembly, before moving onto C and C++. After college I started coding in python, and besides the occasional adventure into other languages as needed I’ve pretty much stayed in the python world.

3. Where is your favorite place to code? In the office, at a local coffee shop, in bed?

I usually work from an office at home but most weeks I travel across the country to Dublin for a day to work with some of the other Irish based Red Hat engineers. I enjoy this time to touch base with colleagues and learn a little about what they’re working on.

4. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

I don’t really follow any specific blogs, instead I rely on the people/feeds I follow on twitter to draw my attention to interesting stuff. I do read lwn.net weekly and find it an excellent source of the current news in the free software world.

5. What drew you to OpenStack?

When the opportunity came up to work on OpenStack I jumped at it. Red Hat was only starting to get involved in OpenStack at the time so there was lots of opportunities to explore the areas that I was most interested in. Since then, there has been no end of new problems being tackled by the community providing an endless stream of interesting projects to get involved in.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack selected as mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014

OpenStack has been selected to be a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014. Thanks to the hard work of many contributors we could join GSoC for the first time.

For those who haven’t heard about it, GSoC is a full-time internship supported by Google that offers students worldwide a stipend to start contributing with coding tasks to an open source organization. This is a great experience for both parts, as it generates a flow of new people with fresh ideas in the organization and allows students to learn and taste how is to work on a real world software development environment.

Even though we have already been selected for it, we are still looking for more project ideas and mentors.

Call for ideas

For this round many developers voluntarily offered to mentor a student in different projects, including OpenStack Scheduler (Gantt), OpenStack Monitoring and Telemetry (Ceilometer), OpenStack Message Queuing Service (Marconi), OpenStack Incubator (Oslo) and OpenStack Networking (Neutron), and proposed several ideas for students to take. Check out the wiki for a complete list of currently proposed ideas.

Is it not mandatory that students stick to these ideas, they can propose their own coding tasks. If you are willing to mentor a student and you have an idea to propose, please feel free to add it to the ideas list in the wiki.

Call for mentors

It’s not late to apply as a mentor! Mentoring is an enriching experience that won’t take you too much time. Learn more about how is to be a mentor in Google’s GSoC Mentoring manual. If you are interested in mentoring, please add your name to the mentors list in the wiki.

Call for students

Students applications start next March 10th and ends on March 21st. By that time, students have to get in touch with the community, select a project, submit a proposal (which may be based on a suggested idea or on a personal idea) and include all the neccesary documentation.

More details about how is to be a GSoC student are described in the Google’s GSoC Students manual.

Currently future applicants are adding their names and contact information in the wiki, so if you want to apply to be an student go ahead and add yourself to this list and get in touch with the community.

Join OpenStack GSoC on IRC

If you want more details about OpenStack’s participation in GSoC, please join us at irc.freenode.org in #openstack-gsoc. It would be great to hear from you!

Category: Communication, community

OpenStack at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Group: Chicago-land Meetup

The Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Group hosted the Chicagoland OpenStack Meetup last night, February 20, 2014.  The night kicked off with some quick introductions from OpenStack Meetup Organizer Erik Martensen and CME Host and Senior Director Vinod Kutty. Then the crowd settled in to listen to OpenStack Cinder Core Developer Mike Perez discuss what’s new with the block storage project. It was a lively discussion with thirty plus minutes of enthusiastic Q&A. Most of the audience had a general to advanced concept of Cinder and some even gave Mike an idea or two about what users want in future releases. A very special thank you to Mike for coming out from Los Angeles to address the growing OpenStack interest in the Chicago community. And, thank you as well to the CME and Vinod for the wonderful meeting space.

Outside of the CME GroupCrowd ShotMike & Vinod quiz the audienceMike that might be in the next releaseMike Talking - Interesting

Category: community, Development, Event, Meetup

OpenStack Atlanta Summit Presentation Voting

Wednesday evening we launched the online tool that allows you to rate the presentation proposals summited for the OpenStack Summit coming up May 12-16 in Atlanta.

This is our second year with online voting for summit presentations, and we wanted to let you know about a bug we’ve just corrected that you might have experienced during the first two days of voting. Alert community members discovered that in some cases, older presentations from our prior summit could be displayed once a vote was cast. (The system randomly selects the next presentation to display, and in this particular case it was not limiting the results to only the upcoming summit.) That’s now been corrected and we apologize for the bug that caused it.

Ultimately, the chairs for each track make the final presentation selections, using the ratings gathered from the community as input. To allow a bit more time for you to cast your votes, we’ve extended the voting deadline until midnight central, March 3rd.

If you are a presenter or voter with any questions or feedback, please let us know: events@openstack.org

Category: Uncategorized

Open Mic Spotlight: Paul Michali

This post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Paul Michali is a Technical Lead onPaulMichaliHeadshot the OpenStack team at Cisco. Although new to OpenStack (started in 2013), Paul has been a software developer for over 30 years working at various companies and industries. His current focus is on VPNaaS, and he has been trying to drink from the fire hose for all things Neutron. An empty-nester, he lives in New Hampshire, USA, with his wife and pets. Outside of work, Paul enjoys photography, playing soccer and volleyball, watching sci-fi and action movies on his home theater, and playing on the skid pad with his BMW. Follow him on Twitter @pmichali

1. Where is your happy place? Favorite place to visit, vacation, decompress? 

One of the special places I go to (except for in the winter), is a small beach about an hour away from home. I take my dog early in the morning and he runs up and down the beach, retrieves (usually) balls and sticks I throw into the ocean, and gives both of us a good workout. Being a morning person, it’s nice to get out and watch the sunrise in a quiet and scenic place.

2. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc. do you read every day?

Besides reading the OpenStack developer mailing list (well, ok, maybe I just browse it :) ), I like browsing through StackExchange areas StackOverflow, Super User, Ask Ubuntu, Ask Different (Mac), Programmers, Unix & Linux, and Photography on a daily basis. For leisure reading, I try to get some news and info via Twitter feeds, and I visit Lifehacker.com daily.

3. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

Probably the best thing that helps me grow as a developer, is the desire to constantly learn new things. I try to read a technical book every month or two, am constantly seeking new techniques, methods, and processes that I can apply, and help people as much as I can. I’m frequently humbled by how much one can learn by reviewing other peoples’ code, and by explaining things to others. It helps solidify one’s knowledge and tests past assumptions and learning.

4. How did you learn to code? Are you self-taught or did you learn in college? On-the-job?

A mixture. Initially, I was self taught. When we got an ASR-33 Teletype connected to a school computer (don’t ask how long ago that was) in high school, I started writing small BASIC programs during free time. The infection took hold, and by the time I was a senior in high school, I had a part time job, at the first personal computer store in my home town, selling computers and writing small custom business apps for small companies in the area.

By then, I clearly knew what I wanted to be when I grew up, and couldn’t wait to get my own pocket protector (yes, I did get one in my first “real” job). I went to college and learned a ton, filling my head with several languages. From there, I started working, and pretty much in each job I’ve had to learn a new language: microcode, Pascal, C, Java, Perl, and for OpenStack, Python.

5. How did you first get involved in OpenStack?

At the very end of 2012, the whole group I was in had completed a major project and had handed off the reins to another development team. As a next assignment, we were offered two different projects, one of them joining the OpenStack team, of which there was a very limited number of openings. It would be a leap of faith for me, to work in a new area (cloud computing), with a new language (Python), using a new process (open source/community based), and as part of another organization in the company.

I had toyed with Python a bit before, writing some tool scripts, and was intrigued by the language. The thought that I could move away from a more traditional development process using C, and into a much more iterative and incremental process with Python, encouraged me to jump at the opportunity and I haven’t looked back since. It’s been the happiest time for me in my career.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 7 – 14)

OpenStack 2013.2.2 released

The OpenStack Stable Maintenance team is happy to announce the release of the 2013.2.2 stable Havana release. A total of 98 bugs have been fixed across all projects. These updates to Havana are intended to be low risk with no intentional regressions or API changes. Official release notes.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

  • Have you redeemed your invite code yet? Do it now! Check your inbox and spam folder if you contributed code before January 25 for yours.
  • Next batch of invites will be sent regularly after each milestone until feature freeze.
  • The call for speakers is open: submit your proposal by end of today.
  • Applying for Visa? Looking for accommodation in Atlante? Visit http://openstack.org/summit
  • Applications for Travel Support Program. Apply by Mar 2.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Other News

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Protected by the gates

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Newsletter

Open Mic Spotlight: Chang Bo Guo

IMG_ChangBoGuoThis post is part of the OpenStack Open Mic series to spotlight the people who have helped make OpenStack successful. Each week, a new contributor will step up to the mic and answer five questions about OpenStack, cloud, careers and what they do for fun. 

Chang Bo is an OpenStacker on IBM’s CSTL cloud team. He has been working on the OpenStack project since October of 2012, with the first batch of OpenStackers from the team in BJ. His first OpenStack contribution can be traced back to 2012, when he worked on the PowerVM driver under Nova to support IBM Power Systems. Now, he mainly focuses on OpenStack Oslo and Nova, and his wish is to work worldwide with top engineers to build the most efficient and high quality common library for OpenStack’s success— Kernel of the Cloud! Find his ‘gpthread’ at http://weibo.com/u/3977991006 or find him on LinkedIn here

1. What publications, blogs, mailing lists, etc do you read every day?

The openstack-dev is the mailing list I must read every day. It is like morning coffee to me, with which I can follow community trends. Another important web site that I read every day is http://www.openstack.cn/. It’s OpenStack China’s technical community. They report on the latest news from OpenStack’s China-based companies as well as technical sharings.

2. If you couldn’t be a developer, what would your dream job be?

I planned to be a physicist when I was young. Physics show the rules of nature, and every new discovery will improve our view of the world. I always got the highest physics score in my high school :).

3. What behavior has helped get you the furthest as a developer?

Always reading code and practicing in a real environment. We learn too much knowledge about how the operating system is running and how to program in different languages. These are just keys to the treasure, and hands on experience makes me feel close to the truth. For instance, I wrote code snippets to verify the wrong usage of sqlalchemy — the code is small but enough to show the truth.

4. What is your favorite project that you’ve contributed code to?

Oslo, the common library for all OpenStack projects. It is very important and useful for each project. We need to guarantee the quality of code to make it work well. I still remember when my first patch for Oslo was merged after a long term review. In this project, we have Python experts and domain experts. New common ideas are raised here, and to review them, I have to dig into Python standard and third party libraries and learn domain knowledge that will help me grow quickly.

5. What do you think is the coolest thing that’s happened with OpenStack over the past three years?

We seem to have finally found a direction that most people believe to build an open cloud ecosystem, and more and more companies and people join the community. I was surprised by this fact, and my friend one day told me that his company had been training them with OpenStack. From my view, his company’s business is far from cloud. The rapid spread of OpenStack makes us more close with the cloud.

Category: Open Mic

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 31 – Feb 7)

Defining OpenStack “Core”

Quite a lot of debates online and not around the DefCore initiative, triggered by a message by Thierry Carrez with comments from Mark McLoughlin, Nick Barcet, Troy Toman, Dan Wendlandt, Mark Collier, Tim Bell, Eric Windisch, Boris Renski, Pete Chadwik, Randy Bias, and others.

StoryBoard sprint in Brussels

StoryBoard is a project Thierry Carrez started a few months ago. Quite a few people in OpenStack have been running into a number of issues with Launchpad (inability to have blueprints spanning multiple code bases, inability to have flexible project group views, inability to use non-Launchpad OpenID for login…), and were investigating replacements. Tired of explaining why existing alternatives wouldn’t work for OpenStack task management, Thierry ended up writing a proof-of-concept to show a practical example. That proof-of-concept was sufficiently compelling that the Infrastructure team decided we should write our own tool.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

  • Have you redeemed your invite code yet? Do it now! Check your inbox and spam folder if you contributed code before January 25 for yours.
  • Next batch of invites will be sent regularly after each milestone until feature freeze.
  • The call for speakers is open: submit your proposal by Feb 14.
  • Applications for Travel Support Program. Apply by Mar 2.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Wei Wang haruka tanizawa
Lukas Bednar Wei Wang
Joanna Huang Facundo Farias
Bertrand Lallau Esperanza Romero
Andrew Kerr Kirill Izotov
Ryan McNair Aneesh Puliyedath Udumbath
Martin Lopes Ruslan Kiianchuk
Donald Dugger Roland Hochmuth
Don Talton Ihor Stehantsev
Ren Qiaowei Tim Landscheidt
Matthew Gilliard Malini Kamalambal
Ronak Shah Nicolas PLANEL
Jay Lee

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

fail-period

submitting a patch that passes Python tests, but realizing jenkins failed you because the commit message has a period at the end

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Category: Communication, community, Event, Newsletter

OpenStack at FOSDEM 2014

FOSDEM 2014 is over and it was a great event for OpenStack in Europe. We had a booth wonderfully staffed by Association des Utilisateurs Francophones d’OpenStack, distributed lots of gratis tshirts, flyers, met hackers with lots interesting questions about using OpenStack and developing it. Thierry Carrez spoke twice, about the burgeoning OpenStack jobs market and about the super infrastructure powering our development process. The most common reaction was: “i had no idea OpenStack was so big”. There were lots of other talks about OpenStack-related projects, too. We’ll keep going to Bruxelles and advocating FOSDEM organizers to find always bigger rooms.

Category: Communication, community, Event

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