The OpenStack Blog

Category: Newsletter

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 31 – Feb 7)

Defining OpenStack “Core”

Quite a lot of debates online and not around the DefCore initiative, triggered by a message by Thierry Carrez with comments from Mark McLoughlin, Nick Barcet, Troy Toman, Dan Wendlandt, Mark Collier, Tim Bell, Eric Windisch, Boris Renski, Pete Chadwik, Randy Bias, and others.

StoryBoard sprint in Brussels

StoryBoard is a project Thierry Carrez started a few months ago. Quite a few people in OpenStack have been running into a number of issues with Launchpad (inability to have blueprints spanning multiple code bases, inability to have flexible project group views, inability to use non-Launchpad OpenID for login…), and were investigating replacements. Tired of explaining why existing alternatives wouldn’t work for OpenStack task management, Thierry ended up writing a proof-of-concept to show a practical example. That proof-of-concept was sufficiently compelling that the Infrastructure team decided we should write our own tool.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

  • Have you redeemed your invite code yet? Do it now! Check your inbox and spam folder if you contributed code before January 25 for yours.
  • Next batch of invites will be sent regularly after each milestone until feature freeze.
  • The call for speakers is open: submit your proposal by Feb 14.
  • Applications for Travel Support Program. Apply by Mar 2.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Wei Wang haruka tanizawa
Lukas Bednar Wei Wang
Joanna Huang Facundo Farias
Bertrand Lallau Esperanza Romero
Andrew Kerr Kirill Izotov
Ryan McNair Aneesh Puliyedath Udumbath
Martin Lopes Ruslan Kiianchuk
Donald Dugger Roland Hochmuth
Don Talton Ihor Stehantsev
Ren Qiaowei Tim Landscheidt
Matthew Gilliard Malini Kamalambal
Ronak Shah Nicolas PLANEL
Jay Lee

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

fail-period

submitting a patch that passes Python tests, but realizing jenkins failed you because the commit message has a period at the end

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 24 – 31)

OpenStack 2014: Powered by Users

If momentum is any indication, 2014 is poised to be a defining year for OpenStack. All of our vital statistics, from community growth to code commits and tracked deployments, doubled in 2013, and all signs point to continued growth. As we start a new year, we in the OpenStack Foundation are putting our resources behind elevating the voice of OpenStack users and tightening the feedback loop between users and developers to influence decisions such as the scope of the project, new feature priorities, interoperability requirements and operational best practices.

New Foundation Gold Members & Sponsors

The OpenStack Foundation is thrilled to have new additions to our ecosystem. Three new Gold Members and 18 Corporate Sponsors have recently joined the incredible list of companies who are supporting the Foundation and driving innovation on the platform.  AptiraHuawei and Hitachi won the OpenStack Board’s approval at the November board meeting and joined the Foundation as Gold members, which requires a strong, strategic commitment to the technology and community. We’ve also seen amazing support in Corporate Sponsorship and we want to share the impressive list of recent additions.

OpenStack Commitment to Interoperability

Now that OpenStack has tons of users, we need to make sure all (downstream) products labeled “OpenStack” have a certain set of core capabilities, and we need to verify those with automated tests just like we do upstream.  End-users should be our focus, and ensuring they get what they want and expect out of the platform once it’s running as a service is paramount.  The goal is to define the first set of tests in time for the May 2014 Summit in Atlanta. If this matters to you, get involved!

Maturing the Horizon Overview Page Part 1 and Part 2

User experience designer Liz Blanchard goes into details about tells in two blog post how she and Ju approached the designing of the Overview page for Horizon.

OpenStack Object Storage release 1.12.0

New release of OpenStack Object Storage (Swift) with new features for operators and end-users alike.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Most Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Reports from Previous Events

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Shalini khandelwal Zoltan Arnold Nagy
Ronelle Landy Aaron Greengrass
salman memon Renat Akhmerov
Tzanetos Balitsaris Ren Qiaowei
Jesse Noller Douglas Mendizabal
li,chen
Steven Weston
Mat Lowery
Jesse Noller
Hirofumi Ichihara
Ed Leafe
Alexander Tivelkov
Pierre Padrixe
Morgan Jones
Matthew Booth
IvanBerezovskiy
Dan Dyer
Allison Randal
Liping Mao
Assaf Muller
 Heather Whisenhunt

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

anigif_enhanced-buzz-32110-1389137850-0

About to start a TC meeting

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack T-Shirt Design Contest

It’s a new year and we’re looking for a new design to grace OpenStack’s T-Shirts. Here’s your chance to show us your creative talent and submit an original design for our 2014 OpenStack T-shirt Design Contest!

If you’d like to participate simply send a sketch of your design to events@openstack.org.

Deadline: March 15, 2014

The winning design will be showcased on T-Shirts given out at PyCon in Montreal, April 9-17, 2014 as well as future events worldwide.

T-Shirt Postcard

For some inspiration, check out last year’s winning design by Raul.  Get your pencils sharpened or fire up your design software of choice and send us your sketches! We’re excited to see what you’ll come up with!

2013 Winning T-Shirt Design

2013 Winning T-Shirt Design

Guidelines:
  • The design must be your own original, unpublished work and must not include any third-party logos or copyrighted material; by entering the competition, you agree that your submission is your own work
  • Design should be one that appeals to the majority of the OpenStack developer community
  • Deign may include line art, text, and photographs
  • Your design is for the front of the shirt and may encompass an area up to 10″ x 10″ (inches)
  • Design may use a maximum of three colors
The Fine Print:
  • One entry per person, please. And it must be original art. Content found on the internet rarely has the resolution needed for print, and it’s considered unlawful to use without permission.
  • Submissions will be screened for merit and feasibility, and we reserve the right to make changes such is image size, ink or t-shirt color before printing.
  • By submitting your design, you grant permission for your design to be used by the OpenStack Foundation including, but not limited to, the OpenStack website, the 2014 OpenStack PyCon T-shirt, and future marketing materials
  • The OpenStack Foundation reserves the right to final decision
  • The creator of the winning design will receive attribution on the T-shirt and public recognition on the OpenStack website!

Chairman’s Corner: Great 2013 to even Greater 2014

2013 was a very active year for the OpenStack board of Directors – and as a personal note, a very enjoyable year.  When the Foundation launched in September of 2012, the critics were troubled that the Foundation would be led by such a large board of 24 members.  Although 24 is large for a board, I am happy to report that the benefits have far outweighed any drawbacks. A large board has allowed many viewpoints, opinions and expertise to be shared, considered and included as part of the decision process. It has served the Foundation well because the board members are focused on the community, are very active and committed to the success of the Foundation.

Over 2013 many new board initiatives were launched. Through these efforts, you can be assured that the Foundation’s finances, trademarks and other assets are under excellent care. The benefits of which will continue to manifest themselves throughout 2014 resulting in additional qualified members, OpenStack Summit travel assistance, aligned training efforts, user experience, adoption and case studies.

As a board we are excited by the prospects that 2014 brings. There are many areas where we want to grow and improve the Foundation.  Those of high importance are the ones we gather directly from the community. A few topics that I’d like to highlight, were gathered recapped at the Breakfast with the Board at the Hong Kong Summit.

Membership Growth

2013 has demonstrated tremendous community growth. Many of the people we talked to at the Summit are fairly new members of the community. We were very pleased to hear that their community experience has thus far been positive. They are encouraged by the tone of the community and the talented people whom are engaged in the effort.  2014 is the perfect point in time to help all members discover ways to contribute their talents and to develop collaborative connections across the community.

Recognition for Contribution

We all enjoy doing something that serves a purpose. Contributing to the OpenStack project provides many ways to do something meaningful. We have a very vibrant community with people who are very dedicated and passionate about what they do.  They give it their best because they’re passionate about the project’s future impact on technology. Finding ways to highlight people for what they do, we help the project to fulfill its purpose and help provide an environment where work has meaning.

Core Definition

OpenStack is enjoying tremendous growth with the number of new projects and programs. While this makes it exciting to be part of OpenStack development, for those that are new and those looking in from outside of the community, OpenStack could begin to look unfocused or fractured. Growth demonstrates the need to convey the message that the core and integrated components are mature and stable while the new projects bring exciting innovation. In our messaging, we’ll balance new features with stability and upgradeability of the code, while ensuring diversity of and innovation around non-core projects and plugins. Throughout 2013 working together the board and TC have been tackling this topic, working toward implementation in 2014.

Individual Director Elections

Over the past year, the board has been evaluating and looking for ways to improve the Individual Director’s election process. Given the dramatic growth of the community, the desire for diverse representation and community participation, the board has been analyzing potential options to find an alternative process that is preferred by the membership and that meets the legal requirements. Community feedback from Summit attendees clearly indicates a need for additional in-depth education prior to the board taking any form of action on this topic.

When a project has experienced as much early success as OpenStack has, it can be a tempting prediction to believe the momentum will slow down. But I’m not betting on it. We at the Foundation board are committed to building on our momentum this year, and these are just a few of the many fun initiatives that the board will tackle during 2014 to do so.  OpenStack is a fun project and a great community.  2013 was a great year. 2014 is going to be even more exciting!

 

OpenStack 2014: Powered by Users

If momentum is any indication, 2014 is poised to be a defining year for OpenStack. All of our vital statistics, from community growth to code commits and tracked deployments, doubled in 2013, and all signs point to continued growth. Still, we continue to hear the questions:

Who’s really driving OpenStack?

Are there too many cooks in the kitchen?

What defines OpenStack, and do we need all of the new programs?

Where’s the voice of the user?

These points reflect the common question of how decisions are made in the OpenStack community. As we start a new year, we in the OpenStack Foundation are putting our resources behind elevating the voice of OpenStack users and tightening the feedback loop between users and developers to influence decisions such as the scope of the project, new feature priorities, interoperability requirements and operational best practices.

Balancing Voices In Software Development

Every foundational technology platform is driven by common forces: the developers who build it, users who consume it, and the ecosystem of vendors that extend it. OpenStack’s development process is unique because it is designed to allow all of these constituencies to directly influence the cloud platform.

In OpenStack, technical decisions – everything from new features to long-term roadmap – are governed by a technical meritocracy in which Program Technical Leads manage the involvement of developers and users in their programs under the oversight of a Technical Committee. The Board of Directors of the OpenStack Foundation, by comparison, focuses its attention on long-term policy, strategy and governance.

Each of these groups already includes representatives who are responsible for real-world OpenStack usage in their organizations, but we can benefit from even greater involvement from users. As we work to raise the level of user involvement, we see that some are simply not as comfortable with open source, but also that our process can be intimidating to dive in and get involved with so many people and moving parts.

The fact we often miss is that technology development is a messy process regardless of how decisions are made. Whether you’re talking about open source or proprietary software, deciding how to evolve a code base is beset by the same kinds of tradeoffs, optimizations and calculated gambles. In the end, your goal is to deliver software that solves a particular set of problems.

For OpenStack, the community chose an open process that relies on the disinfectant of transparency to maximize the chances that all points of view are heard, considered and when embraced by the community, incorporated into the code. How we make decisions in the OpenStack community is a source of strength.

Transparency Is Noisy

Of course, transparency by its very nature exposes the world at large to much more information, insight and noise than a tightly controlled process. A rapidly growing, global, diverse and passionate community of developers and users will disagree. That disagreement is often very useful even if it isn’t always going to be pretty.

But guess what? Because it’s an open process, you get to see it all and participate where you want to make an impact. Backroom and backchannel conversations are still present, to be sure, but their effect is kept in proportion. If you want to understand why particular technical decisions were made – as in the case of the networking stack, for example, with both Neutron and nova-network still present as options – it’s a relatively straightforward matter to find out. In that particular case, when you look, you’ll discover that users said they still needed features available in nova-network, so the deprecation schedule was extended to give Neutron additional time to meet their requirements.

Uncovering the decision chain in other open source projects isn’t always that simple. And with proprietary software, it’s virtually impossible, because the trail of communication from the end user goes through the sales or support organization to product management to the development team like a high stakes game of telephone. It’s a system that’s been in place for a long time, but there’s also a growing consensus that we can’t build software the way we used to.

Proprietary-vs-OpenStack

This level of transparency can be a distraction, and it sometimes makes for snarky, counterproductive and ill-informed side conversations. As we’ve seen in the past year, it can also lead to misunderstandings among the media and analyst communities covering OpenStack with regard to why decisions are made and where the project is headed. But messiness as a result of transparency is not our enemy. Our enemy is an opaque process with no accountability and responsibility to the people using the software.

Amplifying the User Voice in 2014

I have worked with many developers over nearly 20 years, and the ones who have built the best software had a passion for meeting the needs of their users. As we have ramped up the User Committee and put user input mechanisms in place, OpenStack technical leaders have been very enthusiastic about receiving this feedback. That work influenced improvements in the Havana and Icehouse development cycles, and will continue to do so in the Juno release and beyond.

Users bring valuable contributions to the project, whether they are directly contributing code, open sourcing their management tools, contributing to documentation, sharing operational best practices at user group meetups or capturing their experiences through the User Survey and Design Summit talks. In 2014, we are bringing several new initiatives to life to bring the voice of the user closer to our process to deliver the best cloud software:

  • Closing the Feedback Loop – The user and technical communities are working to close the feedback loop in the design and development process to make sure we are delivering user-driven features. Specific activities include an operator’s mini-session to gather input well before the Design Summit, beefing up the user survey with more specific feedback requests, and having more user representatives engage directly on technical mailing lists and in technical Summit sessions.
  • Ramping Up Support of Application Developers and Cloud End Users – A major focus this year will be moving beyond cloud operators to attract and support the growing community of app developers and OpenStack end users. Current projects underway include an aggregation of popular SDKs and developer resources for OpenStack clouds, as well as adding new survey questions for application developers, largely driven by community member Everett Toews. The Technical Committee is also considering how to incorporate a new program focused on user/consumer experience.
  • Establishing Baseline Interoperability Testing – The community is engaged in creating baseline interoperability testing for OpenStack products and open source distributions. Rob Hirschfeld and Joshua McKenty are leading a Board of Directors committee to drive this effort, and it’s important that we have operators and end-users engaged, especially as we work to create a consistent target a better experience for the latter.
  • Clarifying the Path to Adoption – With such a vibrant commercial ecosystem, and still many organizations who are running it themselves, one of the most common questions we hear is how to get started with OpenStack. The answer depends on many factors, including your use case and technology expertise, and this year the Foundation staff is helping users make sense of the many ways to consume OpenStack, expanding on efforts like the Training marketplace.
  • Growing Ambassador Program – Our community managers are also ramping up the global Ambassador program, which will empower more community members to get involved in these initiatives as well as through our traditional contribution channels. We now have 12 Ambassadors in eight countries.

This is of course not an exhaustive list, but they represent key activities in 2014, and now is the time to get involved, whether it’s completing a user survey, joining the interoperability testing efforts, or volunteering with the User Committee.

Pioneering a Better Way to Build Software

We in the OpenStack community are pioneering new ways to do collaborative software development at very large scale. We’re meeting our biannual release cadence, growing our base of contributors, and our testing and review process is already being emulated by other software projects. Reflecting on success is good, but there’s more work to be done.

In 2014, we are committed to bringing more users into our open and transparent process, helping them to participate directly in building great cloud software. When we balance the voices and contributors involved in all parts of OpenStack, we see the incredible power of a diverse community, focused in the same direction, driving change across our industry.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 17 – 24)

Icehouse-2 development milestone available

The second milestone of the Icehouse development cycle, “icehouse-2″ is now available for Keystone, Glance, Nova, Horizon, Neutron, Cinder, Ceilometer, Heat, and Trove. Including the oslo libraries, “only” 50 blueprints were implemented and about 650 bugs were fixed during this milestone, which is slightly less than our usual velocity at that point in the cycle. This is mostly due to the recent issues in gating and the end-of-year holiday season. The next development milestone, icehouse-3, is scheduled for March 6th.

Organizing a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day – Mon Jan 27th

Developers may have noticed issues with our gate and in order to improve the situation Sean Dague proposed a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day on Jan 27th. All developers are encouraged to focus on fixing bugs on the OpenStack CI infrastructure.

OpenStack Swift as backend for Git

The fine folks at Enovance have written about the advantages of using Swift as backend for Git. In a recent blog post they gave also some details about what happens in Git (server side) when a client pushes or fetches objects. They’ve now shared more operational details on how to handle Swift as a backend to store repositories.

Tips ‘n Tricks

By Andreas Jaeger: Python Virtualenv awesomeness – and developing openstack-doc-tools and Setting up gating in the OpenStack intrastructure

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories and Security Notes

Reports from Previous Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Xav Paice Tapan
Donald Stufft Ralf Haferkamp
Zhang Yang Ken Pepple
Eli Klein Jerry Johnson
Gregory Haynes Gregory Haynes
Aaron Weitekamp Eric Brown
JiaHao Li Balazs Gibizer
tinytmy Trevor McKay
LeileiZhou Svetlana Dobogoeva
Joel Friedly Paul Nelson
Enol Fernández Mike Spreitzer
Maxim Kulkin John Speidel
Dima Shulyak IWAMOTO Toshihiro
lizheming Evgeny Fedoruk
Andrew Lazarev
Yuanhui Liu
Kaitlin Farr
Ronelle Landy
Matthew Fischer
Dieter P

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

polite

Jenkins giving me a -1 on my change

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 10 – 17)

Election Results for Individual and Gold Directors

Each January two of the Foundation member classes hold elections to determine their Board representatives for 2014. The Gold Members held their election on January 6th-7th while Individual Members elected their Directors between Jan 12th-17th.

Today the 2014 election of Individual Directors has closed and the official results are in. The elected and appointed directors will be seated at the next board meeting, at 12:00pm PST on January 30th. Thank you to everyone who participated in this year’s Individual Director election and congratulations to our new and returning directors. The composition of the board is on OpenStack blog.

Atlanta Summit – Call for Speakers Open + Sponsor & Registration Info

Marching rapidly to our next big gathering: the OpenStack Summit will be held in Atlanta, Georgia May 12-16, 2014. The official page for Atlanta contains the latest announcements. The Summit is a five-day conference for OpenStack contributors, enterprise users, service providers, application developers and ecosystem members.  Attendees can expect visionary keynote speakers, 200+ breakout sessions, hands-on workshops, collaborative design sessions and lots of networking. Keynote sessions will take place Monday and Tuesday, the main conference will run Monday – Thursday. The Design Summit, a special track for active technical contributors to plan the next software release, will run Tuesday – Friday.

Where to ask question and find help OPW Experience with OpenStack Part 1

One of our awesome intern from the Outreach Program for Women (OPW) shares her experience towards solving a problem while getting stared with OpenStack.

Organizing a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day – Mon Jan 27th

Developers may have noticed issues with our gate and in order to improve the situation Sean Dague proposed a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day on Jan 27th. All developers are encouraged to focus on fixing bugs on the OpenStack CI infrastructure.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories

Reports from Previous Events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Don Domingo Travis Tripp
Xiaolin Zhang RonenKat
Jorge L. Williams Guido Günther
Vahid Hashemian Eugeniya Kudryashova
Michael Krotscheck Ya Hong Du
Jerry Cai Thai Tran
Alexander Ignatov Khyati Sheth
Roman Rader Justin Pomeroy
Jeffrey J. Walls Doug Fish
Aditya Patawari lintan
Joris Roovers Sergey Reshetnyak
Guido Günther Cindy Lu
João Vale songqianxia
Roman Rader
Lance Bragstad
Khanh-Toan TRAN
Maithem
Dmitry Borodaenko
Nassim Babaci
Thiago da Silva
David Charles Kennedy

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

not_a_single_f.gif.pagespeed.ce.CRScJl-DfZ

Keep hitting “recheck no bug” in reviews

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 3 – 10)

How are we picking the OpenStack DefCore “must pass” tests?

WARNING LABEL: THE FOLLOWING SELECTION CRITERIA ARE PRELIMINARY TO GET FEEDBACK AND HELP VALIDATE THE PROCESS.
As part of the DefCore work, we have the challenge of taking all the Tempest tests and figuring out which ones are the “must-pass” tests that will define core (our note pages).  We want to have a very transparent and objective process for picking the tests so we need to have well defined criteria and a selection process.

OpenStack @ FOSDEM ’14

Every year, free and open source developers from all over Europe and beyond converge in cold Brussels for a week-end of talks, hacking and beer. OpenStack will be present ! We have a number of devroom and lightning talks already scheduled.

Becoming a Core Contributor: the fast track

Anyone willing to become a better Free Software contributor is invited to attend the next session of Upstream University in advance of FOSDEM. The training starts January 30th, 2014 in the morning, at a walking distance from Grand Place in Brussels.

Organizing a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day – Mon Jan 27th

Developers may have noticed issues with our gate and in order to improve the situation Sean Dague proposed a Gate Blocking Bug Fix Day on Jan 27th. All developers are encouraged to focus on fixing bugs on the OpenStack CI infrastructure.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Reports from previous events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Nassim Babaci Julien Leloup
Eugeniya Kudryashova Murali Allada
Daniel Kuffner Georgy Okrokvertskhov
Le Tian Ren David Pippenger
Ildiko Vancsa Pradeep Kilambi
Bo Tang Jon Snitow
Lee Li Viswa Vutharkar
Jia Dong Vahid Hashemian
Rafael Folco
Peter Balland
reachlin
Toshiyuki Hayashi
Le Tian Ren
Jerry Cai
Ihar Hrachyshka
Christoph Kassen
Maxim Kulkin
Simon Luo
lizheming
Tim Bell
Sebastien Badia
Nithya Ganesan

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Morning reviews for an OpenStack core

Morning reviews for an OpenStack core

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 3 2014)

OpenStack Documentation Wrap Up for 2013

It’s that time of the new year to reflect and look for ways to keep improving the OpenStack docs. Here’s a list of major events from 2013 in OpenStack doc-land. Anne Gentle looks at the past year in review.

OpenStack strong at LinuxConfAustralia (LCA)

A full-day miniconf on Tuesday and a bunch of talks in the main conference track:

And there’s at least one talk on third-party testing in the CI miniconf on Monday (schedule still TBD), and maybe more surprises.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Reports from previous events

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Gustavo Franklin Nobrega Gustavo Franklin Nobrega
shihanzhang shihanzhang
Igor A. Lukyanenkov Igor A. Lukyanenkov
Caleb Tennis Caleb Tennis
wanghong wanghong
Babitha Babitha
Yuanchao Sun

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

unflappable

Getting asked to fix a minor spelling mistake in my comment

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Dec 20 – 27)

OpenStack “J” naming poll closed

Polls closed, the OpenStack community decided: Juno will be the name of the OpenStack development cycle starting in May 2014, after the Icehouse cycle completes.

Third party testing with Turbo-Hipster

Soon you are going to see a new robot barista leaving comments on Nova code reviews. He is obsessed with espresso, that band you haven’t heard of yet, and easing the life of OpenStack operators.  Doing a large OpenStack deployment has always been hard when it came to database migrations. Running a migration requires downtime, and when you have giant datasets that downtime could be hours. To help catch these issues a new zuul worker called Turbo-Hipster will run your patchset’s migrations against copies of real databases. This will give you valuable feedback on the success of the patch, and how long it might take to migrate.

How to Upgrade an OpenStack Swift Cluster with No Downtime

OpenStack Swift deployers can upgrade from one version of Swift to the next with zero downtime for end users. This has been supported since the initial release of OpenStack Swift back in 2010.

OpenStack Project Update Webinars

To allow for broader participation, we’ve scheduled post-Summit webinars with the Project Team Leads (PTLs) to provide the latest project updates rather than schedule these tracks during the Summit. Next scheduled events:

Tuesday, January 7, 2013
7 a.m. Pacific/10 a.m. Eastern
Project team leads: Mark Washenberger, Image Service (Glance); Julien Danjou, Telemetry (Ceilometer); John Griffith, Block Storage (Cinder)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/4BC36YZQ

Thursday, January 9, 2013
Noon Pacific/3 p.m. Eastern*
Project team leads: Steve Baker, Orchestration (Heat) and David Lyle, Dashboard (Horizon)
Register: http://openstack.enterthemeeting.com/m/AXQYKMP7

Recorded session

Russell Bryant, Compute (Nova) and John Dickinson, Object Storage (Swift)

The recording of the session by Mark McClain, Networking (Neutron) and Dolph Mathews, Identity (Keystone) will be published as soon as possible.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Pentheus Jia Dong
Lee Li Yuanchao Sun
Sergey Nikitin Michael Krotscheck
Taurus Cheung JiaHao Li
Vadim Rovachev Haojie Jia
Tim Bell Bob Callaway
Stanislav Kudriashev Sergey Nikitin
Ken Perkins Dmitry Kulishenko
shihanzhang
Navid Shaikh
Jaume Devesa
Igor A. Lukyanenkov
Cedric Brandily
Feng Ju
Yanis Guenane
Mikhail Durnosvistov

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Watching the zuul queue testing my change

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