The OpenStack Blog

Category: Governance

Discussions at Breakfast with the Board – OpenStack April 2013 Summit

It is an exciting time to be part of the OpenStack community.  It was a great conference with lots of momentum around OpenStack.  The speed and growth of the community is amazing.

Tuesday morning during the Summit, we continued the tradition of Breakfast With The Board (BwtB).  We wish to thank all who participated.  As board members we very much appreciated your comments of support, feedback and ideas.  We heard many positive and encouraging comments  and participated in many lively discussions.

Through this writeup we would like to share what we heard.   There was a wide variety of topics discussed, including:

Summit Design Session Growing Pains
Despite a variety of changes tested and introduced over the past Summits, accommodating all who wish to participate in the Summit design sessions continue to exhibit growing pains.  The design sessions are “intended to be small, focused developer working sessions where the roadmap is set by active contributors on the project.”  With such a description it is easy to see why so many business persons, users, and developers want to participate or listen in. Yet the fear is that a varied large audience will decrease session output.

Many ideas were voiced at the BwtB as to how to address the issue, including room moderators, attendee prioritization, seating arrangements and session segregation.

“Scotty we need more power er WIFI”
While the conference survey will prioritize on  what items will be most relevant to improve for the next Summit, one of the vocal suggestion at the BwtB was the never ending need for more WIFI.  We techies live on WIFI.

Who the heck is…
Leading the list for reasons to attend the Summit is to simply meet people we work with on IRC and other community channels.  A simple suggestion was made that we add IRC nicks in a nice big font to the front and back of the conference badges. 50% of the time you see the back of someone’s badge and don’t know who they are.

Traveling to the Fall Summit
For those traveling to the fall Summit from the North America, concerns over prohibitive travel costs was raised.  Determining a Summit location is made up of many different factors.  Cost of travel being one.    A Summit location effects attendance, whether it be in Portland or Hong Kong.  Balancing that cost can be tricky.   The planning committee investigations concluded that attendees will find that the travel rates will not be the feared prohibitive if they do some research and book early.

Driving Priorities
Several discussions evolved around the idea of how customer priorities are injected into each projects focus and features. Typically in a corporate development model such interests are captured and formulated into the development model through Product Owners (PO) or Product Managers (PM).  How does this map to the OpenStack model?  Which is easily generalized to how does this map to the open source world?

At the BwtB, several of the discussions converged on the notion of contribution.  Contribution either in the form of code, leadership or voice.  One company simply cannot pretend to make choices for resources in another company. At most you can find other resources from a  company which share a problem you are helping describe and therefore solve.

A familiar saying in the open source world is “scratch the itch”.  It is this saying which has driven open source developers for years.  If you find a need that nothing out there can meet, write a solution yourself or better yet voice the need to help find those who share in the need and write a solution together contributing in ways that leverage your experience and expertise or providing support to those who can contribute for you.

Big Vision
Also discussed at the BwtB was the notion of having the TC play more of a role across the various projects, for things like security and API versioning, aligning and setting direction across the groups. Citing the need for the TC (or someone at least) to give more cross project consideration for:
API compatibility and consistency
architectural consistency
security
Input from Users to guide our path

Align the Doc
Opinions voiced concerns that the documentation lags the implementations.  So how do we  make the OpenStack documentation more up-to-date and improve quality and timelines?  That was the question raised by attendees at the BwtB.  Offered suggestions included a requirement for documentation changes to be checked in concurrent with the code, rather than just setting a flag that the doc’s might be effected.

What comprises OpenStack?
A couple of tables discussed the current progress around the current Core/Integrated/Incubated framework with input on moving forward; people seem to prefer the kernel/drivers analogy. There is confusion regarding the new approach to core-integrated-incubation,  what the differences are, who gets seats on the TC, etc.  Early and continued discussions at Technical Committee and Board on this are important for next phases of the effort. It is important  to ensure that the TC and Board sign off on all steps with formal statements by the foundation when we arrive at any and all conclusions.

Interoperability
There is a lot of interop interest. Folks at the BwtB seemed to be mostly happy with the refstack approach. They voiced opinions about whether API-based interop or same-codebase interop is appropriate in various projects and for having verification teams for plug-ins.

Marketing OpenStack
Where does OpenStack as the data center operating system model go?  How to support that?  Marketing discussions ranged across several of the tables.  Including a conversation at one of the tables  on how to best explain OpenStack to CIO/IT Directors. Participants in the discussion felt that the video overviews available on the OpenStack website as well as the user stories presented at the Summit Keynotes were of great help.

Others pondered why FUD is generated by open source competition with a  lack of sense of those for who their competition really should be (proprietary software).

And others voiced concern over perceptions around OpenStack.  These perceptions include, complexity, talent shortages, security gaps and that it takes too many people to run OpenStack.  Such perceptions create a barrier to adoption.

Transparency
The Board at its February meeting, launch a committee to improve transparency and foster collaboration between the foundation members and members of the board, technical committee, user committee and other committees.  Members of the committee took the opportunity to discuss, at their tables, the committee ideas and efforts.  Everyone is all for transparency and seeking a balance between transparency and compromising the strategic position of the project was accepted as an important consideration. The ombudsman and staggered release were seen as valid solutions.

Attendees also voiced the importance for direct participation within project processes.  It is important that the TC and board to listen to what the project have to say.

Elections
The Board at its February meeting also launched an effort to improve the Individual member election process.  The board members engaged in this effort took the opportunity to gather feedback at the BwtB on the ideas and efforts underway.  Many were pleased that a schedule for implementation of changes is being set and were pleased with the efforts so far.

Conclusion
As you can see there was a wide range of topics raised and discussed.  Each of which could be worthy of a full writeup on its own. As a board we appreciate the input.  We will delve into the issues further and will use this input to guide the prioritization of our efforts.  So again thank you for your participation. We look forward to the next BwtB at the fall Summit.

Regards,

OpenStack Board of Directors

OpenStack Summit: Day 1

The OpenStack Summit started in San Diego today. Mark Collier announced during the kickoff meeting that there are over 1,300 people registered at the conference. As a result, lines for lunch were a bit slower than we wished. We’re coordinating solutions with the hotel to improve the situation. There will be also more power strips in the Developer’s Lounge area.

Lots of announcements today: Niki Acosta made a summary of all announcements for this first day. Worth mentioning also that Nimbula joined OpenStack.

Quantum's room was full all day, overcrowded some time.

The notes for each of the Design Summit’s sessions are listed below (note: there might be more etherpad listed on the official wiki page).

Documentation Track

Glance Track

Quantum Track

Nova Track

Swift Track

OpenStack Governance Elections Autumn 2012 Results

The OpenStack community has elected the Project Technical Leads. Here are the winners:

NOVA Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Vish Ishaya (only candidate)

KEYSTONE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Joe Heck (only candidate)

HORIZON Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Gabriel Hurley  (only candidate)

SWIFT Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: John Dickinson (only candidate)

GLANCE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Brian Waldon (only candidate)

CINDER Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: John Griffith (only candidate)

QUANTUM Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Dan Wendlandt (Official poll results)

OPENSTACK-COMMON Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner: Mark McLoughlin (only candidate)

Congratulations to all PTLs. They are automatically granted a 6-month seat on the OpenStack Technical Committee whose election process will start soon.

Join The OpenStack Foundation

We’re excited to announce that we’ve reached a huge milestone in the process to establish the OpenStack Foundation.  Individual Members can now join and begin making important contributions like nominating board members: http://openstack.org/join  (It’s free!)

Thanks to the hard work of the drafting committee (led by the amazing Alice King), we now have a complete set of legal documents. Our Bylaws, with appendices, and Member agreements are now posted online on http://www.openstack.org/legal/.

As a community we’ve really pulled together, made some tough decisions, and I couldn’t be prouder of the result.  It’s hard to believe, but OpenStack just started 2 years ago (with the first release of software, the “Austin” release, in October 2010).  OpenStack seems to have struck a chord, and I think the core values of our community have everything to do with it.  We’ve taken great care to preserve and promote those core values.  Everyone should be extremely proud!

On Tuesday the fine folks at OSCON put on an amazing “OpenStack Day”, and last night those who were lucky to be attending OSCON gathered together to discuss the Foundation progress and start signing up as individual members.  It was quite an amazing feeling to see so many familiar faces, but also meet so many new people interested in OpenStack.

Individual contributors, here are steps you can now take to secure representation in the OpenStack Foundation:

  1. Join as an Individual Member: OpenStack.org/join by August 15
  2. Nominate an Individual for the Board of Directors: Send nominations to secretary@openstack.org by August 6 (candidates require 10 nominations to appear on the ballot)
  3. Vote for Individuals to be on the Board of Directors: Elections take place August 20-24

To provide more context, the following is a full list of key dates and milestones through the formation of the Foundation:

  • July 18 – Initial Platinum, Gold & Individual membership sign up period opens
  • July 18 – Nomination period for Individual member board directors opens
  • August 6 – Nomination period for Individual member board directors closes
  • August 15 – Initial Platinum, Gold & Individual membership sign up period closes
  • August 20-24 – Gold & Individual Board director elections
  • August 27 – Initial Board meeting via teleconference – operational setup
  • October 15 – First regular quarterly Board meeting at OpenStack Summit

Thank you so much to everyone who helped us reach this milestone!

Mark Collier

@sparkycollier

OpenStack Blog Authors Code Of Conduct

With the current number of authors on the community blog I think it’s a good idea to make sure we all have a clear understanding of what it means to have an account on such visible community asset. I think it would be good for the whole community to have a brief, clear, understandable code of conduct for all existing authors and for the future ones. We discussed on our community team and we came up with the OpenStack Blog Authors Code Of Conduct below.  We’ll publish this together with other community policies (like the OpenStack Event policy) in the next days: add your comments below or send them to the community team.

OpenStack.org Blog is the asset owned by the community and a platform where to share thoughts, ideas, reports and news about OpenStack. All the authors of blog posts have the responsibility to respect this common space while being grateful for the opportunity it represents. As a writer you should write articles respecting other’s opinions, even if you disagree. The OpenStack Community will benefit from sharing, debating and reflecting rather than discounting and disparaging others’ thoughts. Remember that as an author of OpenStack.org blog, the community trusts you to give voice to the community as a whole.

Writers accept these simple principles:

  • Prefer facts to opinions: be always aware that what you publish will be read by thousands of people and that your opinion is not necessarily that of the whole community. Try to stick to facts, like reporting the result of a meeting, announcing upcoming community events, describing technical achievements.
  • Disclose, don’t promote: it’s good to let people know that a company is contributing to OpenStack, sponsoring an event and such but the OpenStack.org Blog is not the place to publish a company’s press release or other type of commercial offering message.
  • Contribute to the commons: our blog is licensed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution Share-alike version 3 unported. Pay attention to the license of any material you add to the blog, make sure it’s released under compatible terms.

OpenStack Governance Elections Spring 2012 Results

The OpenStack community has elected the Project Technical Leads and two members of the Project Policy Board. Here are the winners:

NOVA Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner:

KEYSTONE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner:

HORIZON Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner:

SWIFT Project Technical Lead (1 position)

  • Only one candidate

Winner:

GLANCE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

Winner:

PROJECT POLICY BOARD (2 positions)

Winners:

Congratulations to you all! Good work everybody.

OpenStack Governance Elections Spring 2012: Time to vote!

UPDATE: PPB election update: we need to reboot the voting process. Please accept our apology. Read more on http://ow.ly/9lNGf

The OpenStack community is called to elect the Project Technical Leads and two seats of the Project Policy Board. The nominations process is now officially closed and voting can start: all entitled to vote will receive a personal message via email on February 28 and have time until March 3 11:59 PST to vote. The email message will go to the email address included in the Authors file and the one provided during the registration for PPB votes.

The official list of nominees (in random order) is the following:

NOVA Project Technical Lead (1 position)

KEYSTONE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

HORIZON Project Technical Lead (1 position)

SWIFT Project Technical Lead (1 position)

GLANCE Project Technical Lead (1 position)

PROJECT POLICY BOARD (2 positions)

Voting process

Like previous OpenStack Governance Elections, we will use the Condorcet Internet Voting Service from Cornell University, http://www.cs.cornell.edu/andru/civs.html.  This tool uses the Condorcet method of voting which invokes ranking the  nominees instead of just selecting one choice. More information on this  methodology is at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/w8/~andru/civs/rp.html. All registered voters will receive an email with a unique link allowing them to privately vote.

Please note that the voting system is run using private polls with  restricted access to ensure voter authenticity; however all results will  be made public once the election ends. Voter anonymity is guaranteed.  The result’s ranking will be evaluated using Schulze (also known as Beatpath or CSSD) completion rule. If an individual should happen to be elected as both a PTL and General  Member of the PPB, then they will take their PTL seat only and the  elected General Member seat will go to the next highest vote getter in  the most recent election.  Thanks for participating in this essential process.

The election committee is made of Stefano Maffulli, Lloyd Dewolf and Dave Nielsen.

OpenStack Governance Elections Spring 2012: Action Item For All Candidates

The OpenStack community is electing its Project Technical Leads and two members of the Project Policy Board. Details are at http://www.openstack.org/blog/2012/02/openstack-governance-elections-spring-2012/. On February 26 the nominations will close and the voting process will start on February 28 and finish on March 3rd.

The list of nominees is at http://etherpad.openstack.org/Spring2012-Nominees. It’s still open. You must register to vote for PPB on http://ppbelectionsregistration.openstack.org/

Before the voting process starts the election committee asks all nominees to create a page on OpenStack wiki and answer three simple questions:

1a. [for PPB] Since the last elections, what areas have you focused on and what contributions have you made in order to improve OpenStack as a whole?

1b. [for PTL] Since the last elections, what areas have you focused on and what contributions have you made in order to improve your project?

2a. [for PPB] What are the most pressing/important issues facing OpenStack as a whole?

2b. [for PTL] What are the most pressing/important issues facing your project?

3. What is your relationship to OpenStack & why is its success important to you and/or your company?

If you’re a candidate, create a wiki page using the template http://wiki.openstack.org/Governance/ElectionsSpring2012/[Firstname_Lastname] and answer those questions there. Feel free to add more content, too. Those pages will be included in the link sent to all voters.

The election committee is made of Stefano Maffulli, Lloyd Dewolf and Dave Nielsen.

OpenStack Governance Elections Spring 2012

The time is once again upon us for our OpenStack Governance Elections. The OpenStack community is called to elect the Project Technical Leads and two seats of the Project Policy Board. The election committee is made of Stefano Maffulli, Lloyd Dewolf and Dave Nielsen.

  • February 16 – 26 11:59 PST: Nominations open.
  • February 28 – March 3 11:59 PST: Online voting open.
  • March 3 11:59 PST: Voting closed.

Final results will be posted immediately upon election close.

What seats are up for election

  • NOVA Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • SWIFT Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • GLANCE Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • HORIZON Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • KEYSTONE Project Team Lead (1 Position)
  • Project Policy Board (2 Open Positions)

How to nominate yourself or others as Project Technical Lead

Only OpenStack community members who have code in the respective OpenStack subproject are eligible to be elected as that subproject’s Project Team Lead. Please nominate someone from the developer community or yourself at http://etherpad.openstack.org/Spring2012-Nominees under the Nominees heading.  Please provide the name and email address of the nominee. The election committee will then confirm with the nominee that they are willing to run for the position.The list of Approved Candidates will be announced with a new blog post on openstack.org/blog when online voting opens (Feb 28).

How to nominate yourself or others as member of the Project Policy Board

Any registered member of the OpenStack Launchpad group is eligible to run or be nominated for a position on the Project Policy Board. If you want to vote and/or run for a seat you need to register on Launchpad and add yourself to the public OpenStack group on https://launchpad.net/~openstack. Please nominate someone from the community or yourself at http://etherpad.openstack.org/Spring2012-Nominees under the Nominees heading. Please give the name and email address of the nominee. The election committee will then confirm with the nominee that they are willing to run for the position. The list of Approved Candidates will be announced with a new blog post on openstack.org/blog right before the election starts.

How to register to vote for PTL

Only OpenStack community members who have code in the respective OpenStack subproject are eligible to vote for that subproject’s Project Team Lead.  The authoritative list of eligible voters and nominees is the Authors file in each repository. For example, the list of Nova authors is https://github.com/openstack/nova/blob/master/Authors.
Make sure your name and correct email address is there or you won’t be able to vote.

How to register to vote for Project Policy Board

Any registered member of the OpenStack Launchpad group is eligible to vote for the Project Policy Board. If you want to vote you need to register to Launchpad and add yourself to the public OpenStack group on https://launchpad.net/~openstack before registering as a voter using the form at http://ppbelectionsregistration.openstack.org/. Company affiliation is only collected as an interesting statistic; it has no effect on the outcome of the election.

Voting process

Like previous OpenStack Governance Elections, we will use the Condorcet Internet Voting Service from Cornell University, http://www.cs.cornell.edu/andru/civs.html. This tool uses the Condorcet method of voting which invokes ranking the nominees instead of just selecting one choice. More information on this methodology is at http://www.cs.cornell.edu/w8/~andru/civs/rp.html.

All registered voters will receive an email with a unique link allowing them to privately vote.

Please note that the voting system is run using private polls with restricted access to ensure voter authenticity; however all results will be made public once the election ends. Voter anonymity is guaranteed. The result’s ranking will be evaluated using Schulze (also known as Beatpath or CSSD) completion rule.

Thanks for participating in this essential process. Please remind your friends and colleagues to get involved, register and vote!

Recording of OpenStack Foundation mission and roadmap

For those that couldn’t participate to past week’s webinar, here is the recording of Mark Collier and Jonathan Bryce presenting the draft mission of OpenStack Foundation and its roadmap. (The audio starts around minute 2:50). A total of 86 people participated to the events, 51 on Thursday and 35 on Friday. Since the chat was not visible to every participant, we’re disclosing the complete logs of the chat for both events, unedited . All questions were addressed by Mark and Jonathan. We’re looking for a different tool to use for future webinars.

Back to top