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Category: community

OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta

The OpenStack Foundation is delivering a training program to accelerate the speed at which new OpenStack developers are successful at integrating their own roadmap into that of the OpenStack project.  If you’re a new OpenStack contributor or plan on becoming one soon, you should sign up for the next OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta, May 10-11. Participation is strongly advised also for first time participants to OpenStack Design Summit.

With over 1000 developers from 80 different companies worldwide, OpenStack is one of the largest collaborative software-development projects. Because of its size, it is characterized by a huge diversity in social norms and technical conventions. These can significantly slow down the speed at which changes by newcomers are integrated in the OpenStack project.

OpenStack Foundation partnered with Upstream University to train new OpenStack developers and documentation writers to ensure their bug fix or feature is accepted in the OpenStack project in a minimum amount of time. Students are required to work on real-life bug fixes or new features during two days of real-life classes and online mentoring, until the work is accepted by OpenStack. The live two-day class teaches them to navigate the intricacies of the project’s technical tools and social interactions. In followup sessions, the students benefit from individual online sessions to help them resolve any remaining problems they might have. Get all the details on the wiki.

Enrolment for the training session in Atlanta is now open: register and reserve your free seat for OpenStack Upstream Training in Atlanta, May 10-11.

Eventbrite - OpenStack Upstream Training

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 14 – 28)

Why you should be reviewing more OpenStack code

Icehouse 3 is upon us, and as someone that is on a bunch of core review teams, it means a steady drum beat of everyone asking how do they get core reviewers to review their code. Sean Dague explains quite well why you should be doing code reviews.

Trusted Cloud computing with Intel TXT: The challenge

In today’s connected environments, attacks on compute infrastructure are ubiquitous. Major players have been compromised by hackers and malware, with damages inflicted both to their reputation and their business. Protecting the infrastructure from external and internal threats is an important part of operating production grade cloud environments. Christian Huebner introduces how OpenStack integrates with TXT.

Our Cloud in Havana

Upgrading a nearly 50,000 core cloud from Grizzly to Havana can be done with a series of steps, each of which can have short periods of reduced functionality but with constant VM availability. Tim Bell tells us how CERN upgraded its OpenStack cloud.

Status of the OpenStack port to Python 3

Python 3 has been around for about 5 years, and we have excellent reasons to make sure OpenStack runs well on it. Unfortunately, this is not the case. In his article, Cyril Roelandt explains what works, what doesn’t, and what you can do to help.

OpenStack selected as mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014

OpenStack has been selected to be a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014. Thanks to the hard work of many contributors we could join GSoC for the first time.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Other News

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Waiting for zuul to get my review checked

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack selected as mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014

OpenStack has been selected to be a mentoring organization for Google Summer of Code 2014. Thanks to the hard work of many contributors we could join GSoC for the first time.

For those who haven’t heard about it, GSoC is a full-time internship supported by Google that offers students worldwide a stipend to start contributing with coding tasks to an open source organization. This is a great experience for both parts, as it generates a flow of new people with fresh ideas in the organization and allows students to learn and taste how is to work on a real world software development environment.

Even though we have already been selected for it, we are still looking for more project ideas and mentors.

Call for ideas

For this round many developers voluntarily offered to mentor a student in different projects, including OpenStack Scheduler (Gantt), OpenStack Monitoring and Telemetry (Ceilometer), OpenStack Message Queuing Service (Marconi), OpenStack Incubator (Oslo) and OpenStack Networking (Neutron), and proposed several ideas for students to take. Check out the wiki for a complete list of currently proposed ideas.

Is it not mandatory that students stick to these ideas, they can propose their own coding tasks. If you are willing to mentor a student and you have an idea to propose, please feel free to add it to the ideas list in the wiki.

Call for mentors

It’s not late to apply as a mentor! Mentoring is an enriching experience that won’t take you too much time. Learn more about how is to be a mentor in Google’s GSoC Mentoring manual. If you are interested in mentoring, please add your name to the mentors list in the wiki.

Call for students

Students applications start next March 10th and ends on March 21st. By that time, students have to get in touch with the community, select a project, submit a proposal (which may be based on a suggested idea or on a personal idea) and include all the neccesary documentation.

More details about how is to be a GSoC student are described in the Google’s GSoC Students manual.

Currently future applicants are adding their names and contact information in the wiki, so if you want to apply to be an student go ahead and add yourself to this list and get in touch with the community.

Join OpenStack GSoC on IRC

If you want more details about OpenStack’s participation in GSoC, please join us at irc.freenode.org in #openstack-gsoc. It would be great to hear from you!

OpenStack at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Group: Chicago-land Meetup

The Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Group hosted the Chicagoland OpenStack Meetup last night, February 20, 2014.  The night kicked off with some quick introductions from OpenStack Meetup Organizer Erik Martensen and CME Host and Senior Director Vinod Kutty. Then the crowd settled in to listen to OpenStack Cinder Core Developer Mike Perez discuss what’s new with the block storage project. It was a lively discussion with thirty plus minutes of enthusiastic Q&A. Most of the audience had a general to advanced concept of Cinder and some even gave Mike an idea or two about what users want in future releases. A very special thank you to Mike for coming out from Los Angeles to address the growing OpenStack interest in the Chicago community. And, thank you as well to the CME and Vinod for the wonderful meeting space.

Outside of the CME GroupCrowd ShotMike & Vinod quiz the audienceMike that might be in the next releaseMike Talking - Interesting

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Feb 7 – 14)

OpenStack 2013.2.2 released

The OpenStack Stable Maintenance team is happy to announce the release of the 2013.2.2 stable Havana release. A total of 98 bugs have been fixed across all projects. These updates to Havana are intended to be low risk with no intentional regressions or API changes. Official release notes.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

  • Have you redeemed your invite code yet? Do it now! Check your inbox and spam folder if you contributed code before January 25 for yours.
  • Next batch of invites will be sent regularly after each milestone until feature freeze.
  • The call for speakers is open: submit your proposal by end of today.
  • Applying for Visa? Looking for accommodation in Atlante? Visit http://openstack.org/summit
  • Applications for Travel Support Program. Apply by Mar 2.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Security Advisories

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Other News

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

Protected by the gates

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 31 – Feb 7)

Defining OpenStack “Core”

Quite a lot of debates online and not around the DefCore initiative, triggered by a message by Thierry Carrez with comments from Mark McLoughlin, Nick Barcet, Troy Toman, Dan Wendlandt, Mark Collier, Tim Bell, Eric Windisch, Boris Renski, Pete Chadwik, Randy Bias, and others.

StoryBoard sprint in Brussels

StoryBoard is a project Thierry Carrez started a few months ago. Quite a few people in OpenStack have been running into a number of issues with Launchpad (inability to have blueprints spanning multiple code bases, inability to have flexible project group views, inability to use non-Launchpad OpenID for login…), and were investigating replacements. Tired of explaining why existing alternatives wouldn’t work for OpenStack task management, Thierry ended up writing a proof-of-concept to show a practical example. That proof-of-concept was sufficiently compelling that the Infrastructure team decided we should write our own tool.

The road to Juno Summit – Atlanta 2014

  • Have you redeemed your invite code yet? Do it now! Check your inbox and spam folder if you contributed code before January 25 for yours.
  • Next batch of invites will be sent regularly after each milestone until feature freeze.
  • The call for speakers is open: submit your proposal by Feb 14.
  • Applications for Travel Support Program. Apply by Mar 2.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Reports from Previous Events

Upcoming Events

Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Got Answers?

Ask OpenStack is the go-to destination for OpenStack users. Interesting questions waiting for answers:

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Wei Wang haruka tanizawa
Lukas Bednar Wei Wang
Joanna Huang Facundo Farias
Bertrand Lallau Esperanza Romero
Andrew Kerr Kirill Izotov
Ryan McNair Aneesh Puliyedath Udumbath
Martin Lopes Ruslan Kiianchuk
Donald Dugger Roland Hochmuth
Don Talton Ihor Stehantsev
Ren Qiaowei Tim Landscheidt
Matthew Gilliard Malini Kamalambal
Ronak Shah Nicolas PLANEL
Jay Lee

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

fail-period

submitting a patch that passes Python tests, but realizing jenkins failed you because the commit message has a period at the end

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

OpenStack at FOSDEM 2014

FOSDEM 2014 is over and it was a great event for OpenStack in Europe. We had a booth wonderfully staffed by Association des Utilisateurs Francophones d’OpenStack, distributed lots of gratis tshirts, flyers, met hackers with lots interesting questions about using OpenStack and developing it. Thierry Carrez spoke twice, about the burgeoning OpenStack jobs market and about the super infrastructure powering our development process. The most common reaction was: “i had no idea OpenStack was so big”. There were lots of other talks about OpenStack-related projects, too. We’ll keep going to Bruxelles and advocating FOSDEM organizers to find always bigger rooms.

OpenStack Community Weekly Newsletter (Jan 24 – 31)

OpenStack 2014: Powered by Users

If momentum is any indication, 2014 is poised to be a defining year for OpenStack. All of our vital statistics, from community growth to code commits and tracked deployments, doubled in 2013, and all signs point to continued growth. As we start a new year, we in the OpenStack Foundation are putting our resources behind elevating the voice of OpenStack users and tightening the feedback loop between users and developers to influence decisions such as the scope of the project, new feature priorities, interoperability requirements and operational best practices.

New Foundation Gold Members & Sponsors

The OpenStack Foundation is thrilled to have new additions to our ecosystem. Three new Gold Members and 18 Corporate Sponsors have recently joined the incredible list of companies who are supporting the Foundation and driving innovation on the platform.  AptiraHuawei and Hitachi won the OpenStack Board’s approval at the November board meeting and joined the Foundation as Gold members, which requires a strong, strategic commitment to the technology and community. We’ve also seen amazing support in Corporate Sponsorship and we want to share the impressive list of recent additions.

OpenStack Commitment to Interoperability

Now that OpenStack has tons of users, we need to make sure all (downstream) products labeled “OpenStack” have a certain set of core capabilities, and we need to verify those with automated tests just like we do upstream.  End-users should be our focus, and ensuring they get what they want and expect out of the platform once it’s running as a service is paramount.  The goal is to define the first set of tests in time for the May 2014 Summit in Atlanta. If this matters to you, get involved!

Maturing the Horizon Overview Page Part 1 and Part 2

User experience designer Liz Blanchard goes into details about tells in two blog post how she and Ju approached the designing of the Overview page for Horizon.

OpenStack Object Storage release 1.12.0

New release of OpenStack Object Storage (Swift) with new features for operators and end-users alike.

Tips ‘n Tricks

Upcoming Events

Most Popular OpenStack Videos of the Week

Reports from Previous Events

Other News

Welcome New Reviewers and Developers

Is your affiliation correct? Check your profile in the OpenStack Foundation Members Database!

Shalini khandelwal Zoltan Arnold Nagy
Ronelle Landy Aaron Greengrass
salman memon Renat Akhmerov
Tzanetos Balitsaris Ren Qiaowei
Jesse Noller Douglas Mendizabal
li,chen
Steven Weston
Mat Lowery
Jesse Noller
Hirofumi Ichihara
Ed Leafe
Alexander Tivelkov
Pierre Padrixe
Morgan Jones
Matthew Booth
IvanBerezovskiy
Dan Dyer
Allison Randal
Liping Mao
Assaf Muller
 Heather Whisenhunt

Latest Activity In Projects

Do you want to see at a glance the bugs filed and solved this week? Latest patches submitted for review? Check out the individual project pages on OpenStack Activity Board – Insights.

OpenStack Reactions

anigif_enhanced-buzz-32110-1389137850-0

About to start a TC meeting

The weekly newsletter is a way for the community to learn about all the various activities occurring on a weekly basis. If you would like to add content to a weekly update or have an idea about this newsletter, please leave a comment.

Chairman’s Corner: Great 2013 to even Greater 2014

2013 was a very active year for the OpenStack board of Directors – and as a personal note, a very enjoyable year.  When the Foundation launched in September of 2012, the critics were troubled that the Foundation would be led by such a large board of 24 members.  Although 24 is large for a board, I am happy to report that the benefits have far outweighed any drawbacks. A large board has allowed many viewpoints, opinions and expertise to be shared, considered and included as part of the decision process. It has served the Foundation well because the board members are focused on the community, are very active and committed to the success of the Foundation.

Over 2013 many new board initiatives were launched. Through these efforts, you can be assured that the Foundation’s finances, trademarks and other assets are under excellent care. The benefits of which will continue to manifest themselves throughout 2014 resulting in additional qualified members, OpenStack Summit travel assistance, aligned training efforts, user experience, adoption and case studies.

As a board we are excited by the prospects that 2014 brings. There are many areas where we want to grow and improve the Foundation.  Those of high importance are the ones we gather directly from the community. A few topics that I’d like to highlight, were gathered recapped at the Breakfast with the Board at the Hong Kong Summit.

Membership Growth

2013 has demonstrated tremendous community growth. Many of the people we talked to at the Summit are fairly new members of the community. We were very pleased to hear that their community experience has thus far been positive. They are encouraged by the tone of the community and the talented people whom are engaged in the effort.  2014 is the perfect point in time to help all members discover ways to contribute their talents and to develop collaborative connections across the community.

Recognition for Contribution

We all enjoy doing something that serves a purpose. Contributing to the OpenStack project provides many ways to do something meaningful. We have a very vibrant community with people who are very dedicated and passionate about what they do.  They give it their best because they’re passionate about the project’s future impact on technology. Finding ways to highlight people for what they do, we help the project to fulfill its purpose and help provide an environment where work has meaning.

Core Definition

OpenStack is enjoying tremendous growth with the number of new projects and programs. While this makes it exciting to be part of OpenStack development, for those that are new and those looking in from outside of the community, OpenStack could begin to look unfocused or fractured. Growth demonstrates the need to convey the message that the core and integrated components are mature and stable while the new projects bring exciting innovation. In our messaging, we’ll balance new features with stability and upgradeability of the code, while ensuring diversity of and innovation around non-core projects and plugins. Throughout 2013 working together the board and TC have been tackling this topic, working toward implementation in 2014.

Individual Director Elections

Over the past year, the board has been evaluating and looking for ways to improve the Individual Director’s election process. Given the dramatic growth of the community, the desire for diverse representation and community participation, the board has been analyzing potential options to find an alternative process that is preferred by the membership and that meets the legal requirements. Community feedback from Summit attendees clearly indicates a need for additional in-depth education prior to the board taking any form of action on this topic.

When a project has experienced as much early success as OpenStack has, it can be a tempting prediction to believe the momentum will slow down. But I’m not betting on it. We at the Foundation board are committed to building on our momentum this year, and these are just a few of the many fun initiatives that the board will tackle during 2014 to do so.  OpenStack is a fun project and a great community.  2013 was a great year. 2014 is going to be even more exciting!

 

OpenStack 2014: Powered by Users

If momentum is any indication, 2014 is poised to be a defining year for OpenStack. All of our vital statistics, from community growth to code commits and tracked deployments, doubled in 2013, and all signs point to continued growth. Still, we continue to hear the questions:

Who’s really driving OpenStack?

Are there too many cooks in the kitchen?

What defines OpenStack, and do we need all of the new programs?

Where’s the voice of the user?

These points reflect the common question of how decisions are made in the OpenStack community. As we start a new year, we in the OpenStack Foundation are putting our resources behind elevating the voice of OpenStack users and tightening the feedback loop between users and developers to influence decisions such as the scope of the project, new feature priorities, interoperability requirements and operational best practices.

Balancing Voices In Software Development

Every foundational technology platform is driven by common forces: the developers who build it, users who consume it, and the ecosystem of vendors that extend it. OpenStack’s development process is unique because it is designed to allow all of these constituencies to directly influence the cloud platform.

In OpenStack, technical decisions – everything from new features to long-term roadmap – are governed by a technical meritocracy in which Program Technical Leads manage the involvement of developers and users in their programs under the oversight of a Technical Committee. The Board of Directors of the OpenStack Foundation, by comparison, focuses its attention on long-term policy, strategy and governance.

Each of these groups already includes representatives who are responsible for real-world OpenStack usage in their organizations, but we can benefit from even greater involvement from users. As we work to raise the level of user involvement, we see that some are simply not as comfortable with open source, but also that our process can be intimidating to dive in and get involved with so many people and moving parts.

The fact we often miss is that technology development is a messy process regardless of how decisions are made. Whether you’re talking about open source or proprietary software, deciding how to evolve a code base is beset by the same kinds of tradeoffs, optimizations and calculated gambles. In the end, your goal is to deliver software that solves a particular set of problems.

For OpenStack, the community chose an open process that relies on the disinfectant of transparency to maximize the chances that all points of view are heard, considered and when embraced by the community, incorporated into the code. How we make decisions in the OpenStack community is a source of strength.

Transparency Is Noisy

Of course, transparency by its very nature exposes the world at large to much more information, insight and noise than a tightly controlled process. A rapidly growing, global, diverse and passionate community of developers and users will disagree. That disagreement is often very useful even if it isn’t always going to be pretty.

But guess what? Because it’s an open process, you get to see it all and participate where you want to make an impact. Backroom and backchannel conversations are still present, to be sure, but their effect is kept in proportion. If you want to understand why particular technical decisions were made – as in the case of the networking stack, for example, with both Neutron and nova-network still present as options – it’s a relatively straightforward matter to find out. In that particular case, when you look, you’ll discover that users said they still needed features available in nova-network, so the deprecation schedule was extended to give Neutron additional time to meet their requirements.

Uncovering the decision chain in other open source projects isn’t always that simple. And with proprietary software, it’s virtually impossible, because the trail of communication from the end user goes through the sales or support organization to product management to the development team like a high stakes game of telephone. It’s a system that’s been in place for a long time, but there’s also a growing consensus that we can’t build software the way we used to.

Proprietary-vs-OpenStack

This level of transparency can be a distraction, and it sometimes makes for snarky, counterproductive and ill-informed side conversations. As we’ve seen in the past year, it can also lead to misunderstandings among the media and analyst communities covering OpenStack with regard to why decisions are made and where the project is headed. But messiness as a result of transparency is not our enemy. Our enemy is an opaque process with no accountability and responsibility to the people using the software.

Amplifying the User Voice in 2014

I have worked with many developers over nearly 20 years, and the ones who have built the best software had a passion for meeting the needs of their users. As we have ramped up the User Committee and put user input mechanisms in place, OpenStack technical leaders have been very enthusiastic about receiving this feedback. That work influenced improvements in the Havana and Icehouse development cycles, and will continue to do so in the Juno release and beyond.

Users bring valuable contributions to the project, whether they are directly contributing code, open sourcing their management tools, contributing to documentation, sharing operational best practices at user group meetups or capturing their experiences through the User Survey and Design Summit talks. In 2014, we are bringing several new initiatives to life to bring the voice of the user closer to our process to deliver the best cloud software:

  • Closing the Feedback Loop – The user and technical communities are working to close the feedback loop in the design and development process to make sure we are delivering user-driven features. Specific activities include an operator’s mini-session to gather input well before the Design Summit, beefing up the user survey with more specific feedback requests, and having more user representatives engage directly on technical mailing lists and in technical Summit sessions.
  • Ramping Up Support of Application Developers and Cloud End Users – A major focus this year will be moving beyond cloud operators to attract and support the growing community of app developers and OpenStack end users. Current projects underway include an aggregation of popular SDKs and developer resources for OpenStack clouds, as well as adding new survey questions for application developers, largely driven by community member Everett Toews. The Technical Committee is also considering how to incorporate a new program focused on user/consumer experience.
  • Establishing Baseline Interoperability Testing – The community is engaged in creating baseline interoperability testing for OpenStack products and open source distributions. Rob Hirschfeld and Joshua McKenty are leading a Board of Directors committee to drive this effort, and it’s important that we have operators and end-users engaged, especially as we work to create a consistent target a better experience for the latter.
  • Clarifying the Path to Adoption – With such a vibrant commercial ecosystem, and still many organizations who are running it themselves, one of the most common questions we hear is how to get started with OpenStack. The answer depends on many factors, including your use case and technology expertise, and this year the Foundation staff is helping users make sense of the many ways to consume OpenStack, expanding on efforts like the Training marketplace.
  • Growing Ambassador Program – Our community managers are also ramping up the global Ambassador program, which will empower more community members to get involved in these initiatives as well as through our traditional contribution channels. We now have 12 Ambassadors in eight countries.

This is of course not an exhaustive list, but they represent key activities in 2014, and now is the time to get involved, whether it’s completing a user survey, joining the interoperability testing efforts, or volunteering with the User Committee.

Pioneering a Better Way to Build Software

We in the OpenStack community are pioneering new ways to do collaborative software development at very large scale. We’re meeting our biannual release cadence, growing our base of contributors, and our testing and review process is already being emulated by other software projects. Reflecting on success is good, but there’s more work to be done.

In 2014, we are committed to bringing more users into our open and transparent process, helping them to participate directly in building great cloud software. When we balance the voices and contributors involved in all parts of OpenStack, we see the incredible power of a diverse community, focused in the same direction, driving change across our industry.

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